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James Castleberry of Tishomingo County, Mississippi and Some

Related Kin – Carroll, Coleman, Randle, King, Whitehead, Olliphant, and Montgomery

 

 

 

 

 

E-Mail:jkharrison2@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

20 November 2007

Table of Contents

Prologue *

Chapter 1 – Introduction to James Castleberry *

Chapter 2 - William and Lucretia Castleberry (ca 1772 - 1813) (1775 - after 1850

Chapter 3 - Castleberry's in Alabama and Tennessee *

Chapter 4 - Thomas Castleberry (ca 1770 - 1826) *

Chapter 5 - James Castleberry (1793 - 1859) *

Chapter 6 - Elizabeth Carroll (1801 - 1879) *

Chapter 7 - Eastport, Mississippi *

Chapter 8 – Two Mississippi Land Transactions by James Castleberry *

Chapter 9 - Children of James and Elizabeth Castleberry *

Chapter 10 - William Castleberry (The Honest Merchant of Pontotoc) (1830 - 1882) *

Chapter 11 - Annie Rosa Coleman Castleberry (1840 - ca 1925 *

Chapter 12 - Children of William and Annie Castleberry *

Chapter 13 - Charles Rufus Castleberry (1878 - 1963) *

Chapter 14 - Eliza King Castleberry (1883 - 1959) *

Chapter 15 - James C. Castleberry of Yalobusha County (1819 – 1885) *

Chapter 16 - Castleberry’s in the Civil War *

Chapter 17 - Ancestors of Elizabeth Carroll *

Chapter 18 - John Carroll (1664 – 1735) *

Chapter 19 - Joseph Carroll (1699 – 1784) *

Chapter 20 - John (H) Carroll (ca 1732 - ca 1787)---------------------------------------------55

Chapter 21 – James Carroll (1768 - 1813) *

Chapter 22 - Elizabeth Carroll (1801 - 1879) *

Chapter 23 - William Nesbit (1788 - 1863) *

Chapter 24 - Introduction - Coleman Family---------------------------------------------------63

Chapter 25 - Daniel Coleman (1720 - 1777)--------------------------------------------------64

Chapter 26 - Eden Coleman (1764 - 1816)-----------------------------------------------------67

Chapter 27 - Thomas Coleman Daniel (ca 1740 - 1813) *

Chapter 28 - William Randle (ca 1778 - 1830) *

Chapter 29 - Daniel T. Coleman (1800 - 1873) *

Chapter 30 – Children of Daniel T. Coleman and Clarinda Ann R. Randle *

Chapter 31 – Servants of Daniel T. Coleman and Clarinda Ann R. Randle *

Chapter 32 - Introduction to King Family-----------------------------------------------------86

Chapter 33 - Francis King (ca 1740 - ca 1816) *

Chapter 34 - Azariah King (ca 1760 - 1816) *

Chapter 35 - James, Francis, Jr., Elijah, and John King *

Chapter 36 - Mary Abell King (ca 1760 - ca 1825) *

Chapter 37 - Nancy King (ca 1790 - ca 18??) *

Chapter 38 - George W. King (ca 1788 - 1824) *

Chapter 39 - Shadrack King (1798 - 1827) *

Chapter 40 - Meshack King (1799 - 1837) *

Chapter 41 - Lovisa Whitehead King(ca 1797 - ca 1865) *

Chapter 42 - Laura Lovisa King and Samuel Rutherford Olliphant *

Chapter 43 - William A. King (1818 - 1859) *

Chapter 44 - Thomas Rhorea King (1850 - 1935) *

Chapter 45 - Eliza King Castleberry (1883 - 1959) *

Chapter 46 - Introduction --The Montgomery Family *

Chapter 47 – Charles P. Montgomery, Sr (1748 - 1820)-----------------------------------115

Chapter 48 – Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. (1781 - 1851) *

Chapter 49 - James D. Montgomery (1809 - 1865) *

Chapter 50 - John G. Montgomery (1835 - 1926--------------------------------------------118

Chapter 51 - William Bell Montgomery (1829 - 1904) *

References and Notes *

INDEX *

 

"Better to present something which is not complete now (at any time), than the same thing complete, never". Max Jakob, Preface to "Heat Transfer", Vol II, 1957

Prologue

 

The Linage Chart below is a summary of the material to follow. Hopefully it will aid the reader in keeping track of the many twist and turns in the chapters to follow.

Genealogy often lacks the smooth flow of a story line. The story line here starts with my gg-grandfather James Castleberry (Chapter 5) and branches off of him. His wife was Elizabeth Carroll. Her family is presented beginning with Chapter 17. William Castleberry, the sixth child of James and Elizabeth, from whom I descend, is discussed in Chapter 10. His wife, Annie Rosa Coleman, is discussed in Chapter 11. Her ancestors are the next family line presented starting in Chapter 24. The next two families are ancestors of my Grandmother Eliza King Castleberry (Granny). Her paternal King ancestors are discussed beginning with Chapter 29 and her maternal Montgomery ancestors begin with Chapter 43.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linage and Relationships of Key Families

1650- 1661-1735 1705-1780 1734-1791 1770-1826 1790-1879 1835-1890 1878-1965 1900-1970 1935-
GENERATION X

IX

VIII

VII

VI

V

IV

III

II

I

HARRISON:

?

John

Thomas

John

Robert

George

John

Vardaman

James

?-?

1740-1810 1770-1836 1790-1853 1838-1892 1877-1963 1904-1938 1935-

m 1933

CASTLEBERRY:

Henry

William

William

Thomas

James

William

Charles

Annie F

1661-1729 1705-1785 1734-1791 1770-1826 1793-1859 1830-1882 1878-1963 1909-1969
m 1942
BOWMAN: ? ? ? ? Henry Curtis Roy Roy
m 1816 1820-? 1854-? 1896-1961 1943-

CARROLL:

John

Joseph

John

James

Elizabeth

1664-1735 1699-1784 1732-1781 1768-1813 1801-1879

m 1862

m 1905

KING:

?

Francis

Azariah

Meshack

William

Tom

Eliza

1740-1816

1760-1816 1799-1837 1818-1859

1850-1935

1883-1959

m 1817

WHITEHEAD:

Arthur

William

Lazarus

William

Lovisa

1650-?

1685-?

1726-?

1797-1865

m 1876

MONTGOMERY:

?

?

?

James

John

Annie

1804-1865 1835-1926 1859-1898

COLEMAN:

?

?

Daniel

Eden

Daniel T

Annie R

1720-1777 1770-1817 1800-1873 1840-1925

m 1792

DANIEL:

?

William

Thomas

Nancy

1740-1813

?-1828

m 1824

RANDLE:

?

?

James

William

Clarinda A

1745-?

1778-1830 1804-1885
Key Event

Immigrants

Migration South

Revolution-ary War

American Gov

Formed

War 1812

Move to MS

Civil War

WWI

WWII

Korea

Viet Nam

Iraq

Chapter 1 – Introduction to James Castleberry

"They are not dead who live in lives they leave behind. In those whom they have blessed they live a life again", "No Ordinary Time" by Doris Kerns Goodwin, 633

 

 

James Castleberry (1793 – 1859) is my most distant Castleberry ancestor about whom the linage is indisputable. He is on my mother’s side. James Castleberry migrated from DeKalb County, Georgia, to Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in 1840 when he was 47 years old bringing with him his wife and thirteen children. Why he chose to settle in Tishomingo County is unknown but quite likely he was influenced by relatives living nearby in McNairy County, Tennessee (Selmer is the county seat).

My relationship to James Castleberry is as follows: My mother was Annie Frances Castleberry (1909 - 1969); her father was Charles Rufus Castleberry (1878-1963); his father was William Castleberry (1830 - 1882); and his father was James Castleberry (1793 - 1859).

James Castleberry’s father is thought to be Thomas Castleberry (ca 1770 - 1826). Thomas’ father was William Castleberry (ca 1734 - 1791) and his father was another William Castleberry (ca 1705 - 178?). This last William’s father was Henry Castleberry (1661-1729) who came to Pennsylvania around 1683 from Germany. His name was Heinrich Kesselberg before he changed it after arriving in America.

The extensive research of other Castleberry descendants (Dr. Jesse Castleberry1, Dr. Henry Brackin, Jr.2, and George Blau3) has been elsewhere reported and gives an interesting and detailed account of the relationships and wonderings of numerous early Castleberry families in America. The sketches here are primarily about the relationships of one line of Mississippi Castleberry’s, especially the ones from whom I descend. James Castleberry of Tishomingo County, Mississippi, was the patriarch of this line.

James Castleberry was born on the 23 December 1793 probably in Wilkes County, Georgia, and he died on 13 July 1859 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. Who his father was has not been determined for certain. The records indicate that James Castleberry very likely descended from Heinrich Kesselberg, a Mennonite, who immigrated to Germantown, Pennsylvania, from Baakendorff, Germany, arriving in America around 1683.4 The English spelling of Heinrich’s name later became Henry Casselberry or Castleberry. Henry married Catherine Levering probably in Germany. He died in March 1729 and she died in 1767 or 1768, both in Germantown, Pennsylvania. Henry and Catherine Castleberry are nine generations earlier than myself.

According to most accounts Henry and Catherine had eight children.5 One was William (ca 1705 – 178?) who married Margaret Davis and migrated south living in Virginia, North Carolina, and winding up in Georgia in 1769. One of William and Margaret’s children was also a William (William, Jr.) who married Sarah Martin. One of his children was Thomas, born about 1770, probably in Orange County, North Carolina. Thomas grew up during the Revolutionary War in Richmond County, Georgia. One of Thomas’ children (James Castleberry) was my great-great grandfather.

James Castleberry grew up in Wilkes County, Georgia.6 He was in the 1820 census in Gwinnett County, Georgia, which was formed in 1818 from Jackson County. He married Elizabeth Carroll their around 1816 after she arrived in Jackson County around 1812 from the York District, South Carolina (now York County). Her father was James Carroll and her mother was Sarah Miller. The 1830 and 1840 Georgia census lists James Castleberry in DeKalb County adjacent to Gwinnett County. According to a Gwinnett County notice in an Athens, Georgia, newspaper in January 1837, a letter for James Castleberry in the Lawrenceville Post Office had not been picked-up.

James and Elizabeth Castleberry had at least seventeen children born to them during their married life in Georgia and Mississippi.

In 1840 James and Elizabeth Castleberry moved to Tishomingo County, Mississippi. The family members and their approximate ages in 1840 were as follows:

FAMILY

MEMBER

AGE

IN

1840

James (Father) 47
Elizabeth (Mother) 39
James, Jr. 23
Sarah 22
John Thomas 20
J. Eulla 15
Cenith (?) 10
Nancy B. 10
William

(my great grandfather)

10
Thomas C. 9
Elizabeth 8
Rufus 7
Nina (Permilliua) 4
Winchester 2
Riley 2

 

 

 

In Mississippi, James Castleberry settled about five miles south of the bustling little town of Eastport on the Tennessee River in the extreme northeast part of the state. He and his son-in-law, Jackson Akers (the husband of Sarah Castleberry) were listed on the Tishomingo County records as new residents in 1840. They do not, however, show up in the 1840 Federal census. The official enumeration day of the census was 1 June 1840. Perhaps they were in-transit during this time.

On 13 November 1840, James Castleberry bought 480 acres of land from Wade Blasingame for $800.00. He continued to buy and sell land in the vicinity of Eastport for the next eleven years. Two significant transactions are mentioned later in Chapter 8.

Three more children were born to James and Elizabeth after their arrival in Mississippi. They were:

NAME

YEAR

BORN

Charles C.

1841

John W.

1846

Georgia A.

1846

 

 

 

 

 

On 1 September 1851 James Castleberry deeded what apparently was all of his property to his wife. This amounted to 800 acres of land valued at $4000.00.

James Castleberry died on 13 July 1859. He is buried in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery (also called Mt. Pleasant and Toenail) on County Road No. 956 between Iuka and Eastport, Mississippi. Elizabeth Carroll Castleberry died in July 1879 and she is buried beside her husband.

 

 

 

 

Chapter 2 - William and Lucretia Castleberry

(ca 1772 - 1813) (1775 - after 1850)

A man finds room in the few square inches of his face for the traits of all his ancestors; for the expression of all his history, and his wants.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

In 1840 when James Castleberry moved to Tishomingo County, Mississippi, living nearby in McNairy County, Tennessee, were Lucretia Castleberry and the families of several of her grown children. This group of Castleberry’s was undoubtedly close kin to James Castleberry and most certainly had a great influence on his decision to move his large family from north Georgia to northeast Mississippi. Exactly what kin they were I do not know.

William Castleberry (husband of Lucretia) was born around 1772, probably in Orange County, North Carolina. Who his father was is not known with a great deal of certainty. Brackin1 has concluded that William’s father was probably John Castleberry who was killed by the Tories during the Revolutionary War. William’s will in 1813 was witnessed by his sons, Odom (or Adam) and Mark and probated in Jackson County, Georgia, before Justice of the Peace William Nesbit, the half-brother of Elizabeth Carroll and later wife of James Castleberry.

William Castleberry’s wife was Lucretia Castleberry. Her maiden name is unknown. From census records we know that she was born in 1775 and died after 1850 in McNairy County, Tennessee. Lucretia married William Castleberry probably around 1795. He died in Jackson County, Georgia, in 1813 at about the age of 41.

After his death Lucretia and her children migrated to Lawrence County in north Alabama. The county was created in 1818 from land ceded by the Indians around 1816. Exactly when she arrived is not know, perhaps in 1818 or 1819. In any case she had arrived by 1820 when the census was taken since she is listed with six children in her household, four males and two females. Four of these were: Odom (ca 1800 - ca 1838), Mark (1803 - ca 1870), Lucretia (1808 - ? ?), and Issac (1815 - ca 1885). Isaac is perhaps her grandson, if his 1815 birth date is correct, since this date is a couple of years after Lucretia’s husband died.

Living near Lucretia and her family in 1820 was William Castleberry with a wife and three children, two males and one female. According to Brackin2 and Blau3 this may be Lucretia’s eldest son. He undoubtedly had quite a lot to do with Lucretia’s move to Lawrence County, Alabama. Perhaps he arrived earlier or migrated from Georgia to Alabama with her. This same William is in the McNairy County, Tennessee, census in 1830 with three sons and four daughters. He supposedly was in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in 1850 but I have been unable to find him in the census.

I have found no Castleberry land records for this time period (1818 - 1830) in Lawrence County, Alabama (the courthouse burned in 1859).

Lucretia and her family left Alabama sometime after 1825 and moved to McNairy County, Tennessee, where she shows up in the 1830 census. Lucretia was last listed in the McNairy County census in 1850 at the age of 75. The children of William and Lucretia4 were:

1. William: born around 1795. He is found in Lawerence County, Alabama, in 1820 and later in 1830 in McNairy County, Tennessee.3 His full name may have been William Washington Castleberry since in the 1850’s there are several land transactions in McNairy County under that name.

On 21 December 1851 in McNairy County William Washington Castleberry bought 112 acres (civil district no. 9) from William Stephenson for $150.00.5

On 1 January 1852 William Washington Castleberry bought 295 acres of land in McNairy County, Tennessee, (T? R5 S1) from Eli T. Walker and his wife Elizabeth Lucretia (?) and John H. Walker and his wife Mary Jane.6

On 4 October 1852 William Washington Castleberry sold 112 acres (civil district no. 9) to Allen Kendrick in McNairy County for $125.00.7 He had bought this land about ten months earlier for $150.00.

2. John: was born 11 April 1797 probably in South Carolina. He married Rebecca Osborn in Lawrence County, Alabama, on 4 December 1823.8 They moved to Maury County, Tennesssee. All of their children were born in Tennessee. They were: Eleanor, Lucretia, William W., Sarah, Odom N., and Rebecca. Most of them married and moved to Texas. In 1836 John and Rebecca moved back to Lawrence County, Alabama, and in 1852 Rebecca died. That same year John was remarried to Susanah Mackey in Lawrence County. They had two sons, John and James, who later moved to Texas.

3. Odom (or Adam): was born about 1800 and died in 1838. He married Jane Henry in Lawrence County, Alabama, on 12 Aug 1823.9,10 They later moved to McNairy County, Tennessee, where at least two sons and four daughters were born before 1840. Odom died in McNairy County before 1840. He is in the 1830 McNairy County census. Jane is listed in the 1840 census but not in the 1850 census.

4. Mark: was born around 1803. He was probably living in Lawrence County, Alabama, in 1820 with his mother. He is in the McNairy County, Tennessee, census in 1830 and 1840 and in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in the 1850 census. He had four sons and four daughters born between 1825 and 1840. Some of them were: Thomas, Sarah, Lucretia, Jane, Nancy, Joseph, and Mark. William, age 20 in the 1850 Tishomingo County, Mississippi, census, may be an older son.11 Mark’s first wife, Jane ____,12 died and he apparently moved to Tishomingo County, Mississippi, soon afterwards since he was elected constable there on 8 November 1847.13 Two years later, in 1849, he was elected a Justice of the Peace for Tishomingo County (District No. 2). He married Rhoda Smith in Tishomingo County on 10 March 1850.14 Her brother, John S. Smith, married Nancy B. Castleberry (Mark’s daughter) in Tishomingo County on 25 July 1849.15 The children of Mark and Rhoda were: Virginia, Adolphus (he moved to Des Arc, Arkansas), and Prudy Angelina.16 Mark moved to Polk County, Arkansas, around 1860 and died there after 1870.17

5. Lucretia: was born 22 Nov 1808.18 She married Joseph Burks in Lawrence County, Alabama, on 22 Nov 1825.19 He was a Methodist minister.18 They moved to McNairy County, Tennessee, soon thereafter where he died around 1865. She was still living there in 1870 when she and her son, Joseph G. Burks, bought back 150 acres of land for $500.00 from her relative Isaac Castleberry.20

6. Isaac: was born 5 May 1815 and died 26 July 1877 according to his tombstone.21 He may be Lucretia’s grandson (apparently not her son since Lucretia’s husband, William Castleberry, died in 1813). Isaac’s father was maybe William, Lucretia Castleberry’s eldest son. Isaac was also undoubtedly in Lawrence County, Alabama, in 1820 with Lucretia Castleberry. He migrated to McNairy County, Tennessee, with her around 1828. Isaac is not listed separately in the 1830 McNairy County census meaning that he was perhaps still in her household. He was probably married around 1840 in McNairy County, Tennessee.

Isaac was listed in the 1840 census and had his wife, Elizabeth House (or maybe Pratt),22 two unknown females (maybe sisters of his wife), and Lucretia (his mother--or grandmother) living with him.

On 9 March 1844 Isaac Castleberry gave P. P. Adams of McNairy County 30 hogs, 2 steers (two years old), 1 clock, and 1 desk as payment for a $21.00 debt that was due on 1 January 1844.23

The 1850 census list Isaac 36, his wife, Elizabeth 26 (12 Jan 1821 - 26 Nov 1893), his mother (or grandmother), Lucretia 75, and his children, Tennessee A. 9, William W. 8, Samuel M. 6, Sarah M. 3, and Riley Jefferson Castleberry 9 months. Caroline House 15 (maybe his wife’s sister) was also living with Isaac’s family in 1850.

In the 1860 census Lucretia Castleberry’s name does not show, so she apparently died sometime after 1850. She would have been about 85 years old in 1860.

On 16 January 1866 Isaac Castleberry paid $300.00 to his sister (or was she his aunt ?), Lucretia Burks, to purchase from her 150 acres of land24 in McNairy County, Tennessee. This was one-half of Lucretia’s land (the east one-half). This sale was brought on by the death of her husband, Joseph Burks. Five years later Isaac sold this track to Lucretia’s son, Joseph Burks, Jr. for $500.00.

On 20 March 1869 five tracks of land (386 acres) in McNairy County25 were sold to A. G. Hurley for $2500.00 by Isaac Castleberry, the appointed administrator. This land had belonged to John Smith, deceased. John Smith was the husband of Nancy B. Castleberry (Mark Castleberry’s daughter) and the brother of Rhoda Smith (the second wife of Mark Castleberry).

On 4 March 1870 Isaac Castleberry sold 150 acres to Joseph G. Burks, Jr. for $500.00.26 This was land in McNairy County that Isaac bought for $300.00 from his sister, Lucretia Burks, five years earlier.

In the 1870 census Isaac’s occupation is given as physician. Additional children in 1870 were: Leona Alice 16, Mary B. 14, George C. 8. Other Castleberry relatives residing with Isaac in 1870 were: John H. 12, John D. 15, and James J. 12.

People in McNairy County have told Dr. Brackin27 that Isaac Castleberry was a physician (he is so listed in the 1870 census) and that during the Civil War he lived near the western edge of the Shiloh, Tennessee, battlefield. After the battle he treated a considerable number of wounded soldiers, both Union and Confederate, at his home that he turned into a hospital. It was necessary for him to amputate so many legs and arms that he was known thereafter as "Sawbones" Castleberry.

Isaac died on 26 July 1877 according to his tombstone. He and his wife and three of his children, Leona Alice (26 Feb 1854 - 14 May 1911); Riley J. (27 June 1849 - 22 Oct 1850); and Tennessee (30 Apr 1841 - 2 Nov 1918) are buried in the Tulu Cemetery near Acton, Tennessee. Acton is in the southeast corner of McNairy County on Tennessee Highway 22 about a mile north of the Mississippi-Tennessee state line and northeast of Corinth, Mississippi, by about 8 miles.

 

Chapter 3 - Castleberry's in Alabama and Tennessee

"Begin doing what you want to do now. We are not living in eternity. We have only this moment, sparkling like a star in our hand--and melting like a snowflake."

----Marie Beyon Ray

 

 

 

In 1820 Lucretia Castleberry and her family were residents of Lawrence County, Alabama, according to the census. She moved from Gwinnett County, Georgia, where she had been married to William Castleberry who died in 1813. Sometime after 1813 she and her three children, Odom, Mark, Lucretia, and perhaps Isaac (her grandson) moved west to the newly created state of Alabama. Living close to Lucretia in 1820 was a William Castleberry who was undoubtedly a relative, perhaps a son. He had a wife and three children. Later, in 1830, this William was living in McNairy County, Tennessee, near Lucretia and her family. No trace of him has been discovered after 1830.

The Castleberry migration from north Georgia to north Alabama was apparently rather common. In the 1820 Conecuh County, Alabama, census there is a Job Castleberry listed. And there were others, as well.

In the 1820 Tennessee census there were a Joseph Caselberry family and a John Caselberry family in Robertson County (on the Kentucky line almost due north of Nashville).

In the 1830 Tennessee census Lucretia and William, who is mentioned above as perhaps being her son, were listed in McNairy County. Also listed was Odum (or Odom) and his family, Odum being Lucretia’s oldest son; Mark and his family, Mark being another son; and Joseph Burks who married Lucretia’s daughter, Lucretia, in Lawrence County, Alabama, in 1825. In nearby Maury County, Tennessee, there was a John Castleberry family listed. That must have been John (son of Lucretia) and his wife Rebecca.

In the 1840 Tennessee census Lucretia had moved into the household of her youngest son (or grandson), Isaac and his wife Elizabeth. Odum had died and his wife Jane was the head of that household. Mark and his family and Joseph and Lucretia Burks were also listed. They all resided in McNairy County. In Tishomingo County, Mississippi, just a few miles south, James Castleberry and his family were new homesteaders. James Castleberry relationship to Lucretia is not known. Whatever the connection, it quite likely contributed to James Castleberry’s decision to move to Tishomingo County. Making the move with him was his wife and thirteen children, plus a son-in-law. About 65 miles due west of McNairy County in Giles County, Tennessee, two Castleberry families were listed in the 1840 census. They were J. Castleberry and Susan Castleberry.

In the 1850 Tennessee census the Joseph Burks and Isaac Castleberry families were listed in McNairy County. Lucretia was 75 years old and still living with Isaac. Mark had moved to Tishomingo County, Mississippi. His wife, Jane, died and he married Rhoda Smith there on 10 March 1850. A new family in McNairy County was that of William Castleberry, age 26 and born in Alabama. In Giles County were Susan Castleberry, age 53 and born in Alabama, and a W. Castleberry, age 26 and born in Tennessee. This may be George Washington Castleberry1 who married Mary Jane Beal (1830 - 1910). George Washington Castleberry died in 1857.2 In St. Clair County was Franklin Castleberry, age 31, and born on 26 June 1826 near Nashville. His parents were Joseph and Mary Castleberry.3

Several Castleberry marriages occurred in Lawrence County, Alabama, in the early 1800s. Armon Castleberry married Parlesea E. Wells on 24 May 18384 and Odum M. Casselberry married Nancy Jane McCluskey there on 20 December 1848.5 That same year William W. Casselberry married Nancy E. McGaughey on 25 October 18486 and John Castleberry married Susannah Mackey in Lawrence County on 13 July 1852.7

Most of the Lawrence County, Alabama, Castleberry clan moved west to Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, etc., but not all. According to a 15 October 1875 newspaper article in the Moulton Advertiser (Moulton, Alabama) a Mrs. R. Castleberry, age 71, was still living in Lawrence County, Alabama.8

Chapter 4 - Thomas Castleberry (ca 1770 - 1826)

Keep away from people who belittle your ambitions.

Mark Twain

 

 

Thomas Castleberry was probably the father of James Castleberry.1 Thomas was born around 1770, maybe in Orange County, North Carolina. He grew up in Richmond County, Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. In 1805 he was in the Jackson County, Georgia, land lottery. He was in Clarke County, Georgia, in 1808 and in Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1820. He later moved to DeKalb County, Georgia, and died there in 1826 according to a notice2 in the September 12, 1826, issue of the Milledgeville, Georgia, newspaper as follows: DeKalb County, Georgia; Whereas Silas McGrady applies for letters of administration on the estate of Thomas Castleberry, late of said county, deceased --- given under my hand this day of August 1826. (Signed) Charles Murphey, C.C.O.

Thomas’s father was very likely William Castleberry, Jr. who married Sarah Martin. William Castleberry, Jr.’s father was the William who married Margaret Davis and came south. And this last William’s father was the immigrant, Henry Castleberry (or Heinrich Kesselberg).3

Chapter 5 - James Castleberry (1793 - 1859)

"No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another."

Charles Dickens

 

James Castleberry, my great-great grandfather, was born on the 23 Dec 1793 in or near Wilkes County, Georgia,1 and died on 13 July 1859 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

His father is thought to have been Thomas Castleberry, although no proof of this has been found.2 The reasons for this belief are Thomas Castleberry’s age, his residency in Jackson County in 1805, and supposedly before then as well, and the fact that James named two of his sons Thomas.

The only record so far found about James Castleberry’s life as a young man in Jackson County is the following copy of a bounty land claim that he had prepared in 1851:

State of Mississippi

County of Tishomingo

On this 25th day of January 1851 personally appeared before me an acting Justice of the Peace in and for the said county James Castleberry who being duly sworn according to law declares that he is aged 57 years, a resident of Tishomingo, Mississippi -- that he is the identical individual who was a private in the company of Captain Joseph Horton’s Georgia foot volunteers -- (that the service was on the frontier, Captain Horton’s company never mustering with any other company -- no Colonel ever visiting them therefore he thinks that there was none -- if there was one it might be Colonel Key) -- In the War with Great Britain declared by the United States on June 18, 1812 -- That he volunteered at Jackson County, Georgia, and was mustered in service at Fort Daniel, Jackson County, Georgia, on or about the 1st of January 1815 for three months and continued in active service (stationed at Fort Daniel) about 60 days and was honorable discharged at Fort Daniel, Georgia, on or about the 1st of March 1815 -- that he has not seen his discharge for over 30 years -- that he left it with his father -- that his father is dead and his papers are destroyed, and he has no reason to think it in existence.

He makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the benefit of the "Act of September 28, 1850".

He request his said warrant when issued to be sent to Reynolds and Kinyon, Jacinto, Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

James Castleberry

I do not know the outcome of James Castleberry’s claim. The two men, Reynolds and Kinyon, were lawyers in Jacinto, the Tishomingo County seat in 1851. Jackson Akers, the Justice of the Peace, was James Castleberry’s son-in-law. Fort Daniel was located at Hog Mountain on State Route 124 between Braselton and Lawrenceville, Georgia. A marker has been erected to show its location (this part of Jackson County became Gwinnett County in 1818). The fort was constructed in 1813 by Major Tandy Key (later Colonel Key and probably the Colonel Key mentioned by James Castleberry) and Captain Nehemiah Garrison. Captain Garrison first commanded the fort. A later commander was Captain Joseph Wharton, probably the Captain Joseph Horton referred to by James Castleberry.3

 

 

 

Chapter 6 - Elizabeth Carroll (1801 - 1879)

By the yard life is hard--By the inch life's a cinch

James Castleberry married Elizabeth Carroll around 1816 in Jackson County, Georgia. She was born in 1801 in York District, South Carolina and died in July 1879 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. More information is given about her in Chapter 22, page 60.

 

Chapter 7 - Eastport, Mississippi

The best way up (from depression) is to help someone else up

 

 

 

In 1840 James Castleberry moved his family from DeKalb County, Georgia, to Tishomingo County, Mississippi. He settled near the bustling little town of Eastport which was on the banks of the Tennessee River. Eastport was created, along with the rest of Tishomingo County, in 1836 and incorporated in 1838. It was the eastern terminal of much Tennessee River traffic in those days since the treacherous muscle shoals were just a little further east near Florence, Alabama. Passage over these shallow rocky spots was often difficult and sometimes dangerous, especially during dry spells when the river was low. So, much steamboat traffic from Louisville and other points north and west began and ended at Eastport. Five or six steamboats at a time were often seen loading cotton and other farm crops and unloading manufactured goods for Eastport and the northeast region of Mississippi.

When Tishomingo County was created in 1836 the county seat was located at Jacinto. Stagecoach lines ran from Eastport to Pontotoc, Columbus, Tupelo, and Ripley. The seventy-five mile trip to Tupelo took about three days and nights from Eastport.1

By 1849 Eastport had two churches, two schools, law offices, wholesale houses, grocery and dry goods stores, a drug store, cotton brokers, a livery stable, warehouses, two inns (or taverns), a newspaper, carriage shops, and many homes.

The population of Tishomingo County during these early years was as follows:

Also in business in Eastport in 1849 were Castleberry and Vaughn (which Castleberry is not known) who operated a wharf boat on the Tennessee River used to receive, store, and freight cotton.2

Two educational institutions existed - the Eastport Female Institute and the Male Eastport Academy.

Eastport newspapers included the weekly North Mississippi Union published from 1850 to 1854 by Mr. M. G. Lewis. Other papers were the Eastport Herald (1849) and the Jacinto Reporter (1849) published by Dr. M. A. Simmons, a Whig. When this paper was moved to Eastport in 1850 its name was changed to the New Eleven and Mr. B. S. Kenyou became the editor. Still later this paper was bought by Dr. J. S. Davis in 1857 (or 1858) and had its name changed to the Iuka Gazette. Other Eastport newspapers existing during the early 1850’s were the Eastport Republican and the Eastport Gazette.

Eastport reached the peak of its prosperity and population about 1854. At that time there were at least four physicians, several attorneys, a sign painter, a New York tailor, a cabinet maker, several real estate and insurance salesmen, and numerous grocery, dry goods, cotton brokers, and clothing merchants. There were also three hotels - one called the Mansion House - a telegraph office, the post office, a Baptist and a Methodist church and Masonic Lodge No. 94.

Finally, there were numerous saloons, some owned by three sons of James Castleberry. James, Jr., was issued a saloon license in 1843 (he was twenty years old), then John in 1845, and later in 1850 William (age twenty) followed in his brother’s footsteps. In 1854 William was still in the saloon business according to county records.

In 1857 the Memphis and Charleston Railroad (now the Norfolk and Southern) was completed linking the Mississippi River with the Atlantic Ocean. During the construction phase the railroad officials offered the prosperous citizens of Eastport the chance to have the railroad pass through their thriving town for a price of $20,000.00.3 The citizens declined and the railroad passed about fifteen miles south of Eastport through Iuka. This ill-fated decision was the beginning of the end for Eastport and soon the majority of the merchants and citizens moved to Iuka to take advantage of this new form of transportation.

Much of the original town of Eastport was flooded in 1938 when the Tennessee Valley Authority built Pickwick Dam. All that is left today of Eastport is a boating marina on Pickwick Lake with few visible signs remaining of its former days of glory as a bustling riverboat town and trade center.

A letter written in 1874 that mentions Mrs. Castleberry, no doubt Elizabeth Carroll Castleberry who would have been 73 years old at the time, is enclosed below:4

"For two long years we had been expecting a trip to Eastport. At last the time arrived much to our satisfaction; for a week before we started we talked about nothing but Eastport. It rained a great deal during the week and we feared very much that it would rain on Saturday. On Friday we made our arrangements to leave early next morning. Mrs. Price, Mrs. Nance, Messrs. Johnnie, Tommie, and Jimmie Price, Lu Lee Bowdre, cousin Bettie and myself constituted our party on the occasion. We were sadly disappointed in not having my dear friend Rosa with her bright smiles to go with us. We missed her merry voice in our round and the wind blew very cold, but we wrapped up warmly in our shawls and cousin Bettie with her sunbonnet comfortably pinned on, but Lu Lee and I preferred to wear our hats thinking it world not do to wear a sunbonnet to Eastport. So being ready, we started to our friend’s where we found the wagon waiting, jumped in and off we started with many a merry laugh. Mrs. Price and Mrs. Nance only accompained us a few miles to spend the day with Mrs. Castleberry. Soon the sun shone out brilliantly and the beautiful hills rose one above the other, with the breastworks stretching over them. Below the silvery water made sweet music in rippling over the pretty little rocks. This beautiful stream flows from the foot of the hills over a rocky bed until sufficiently large to turn an over-shot wheel of a grist mill, which presents quite a picturesque scene, with the rugged background and the deserted village nearer the border of the Tennessee River. In bygone days Eastport was the abiding place for many happy families, but time and the ravages of war have dealt unkindly with its prosperity. Yet by nature it is still beautiful and pleasant associations cluster around the glory of the past with many former residents. We saw from the wharf-boat on the deep, smooth water of the Tennessee a table rock overlooking a deep precipice called "Lovers Leap". From this elevated romantic eminence a wide scope of country can be viewed, representing an unbroken chain of rounded hills through which the waters of the Tennessee triumphantly flow. After feasting our eyes upon the beauties of nature, we enjoyed a sumptuous basket-dinner and rambled over the fields to the mouth of the creek, amusing ourselves in various ways until it was time to homeward bound. On our return, we paused at the foot of one of the loftiest hills, ascended it, viewed the landscape over, gathered souvenirs, and resumed our journey to Mrs. Castleberry’s where we found Mrs. Price and Mrs. Nance had spent a delightful day. Having then our complement of passengers on board the wagon, we joyously quickened our movement and soon found ourselves admiring a bird’s eye view of Iuka again. All agreed that it was a lovely village, the railroad, with neat homesteads nestled among the evergreens. A soft hazy atmosphere seemed to envelop the whole village, the most conspicuous and beautiful part to which was our noble seat of learning, the Iuka Female Institute. We reached home about 5 o’clock p. m., feeling greatly refreshed mentally and physically. Lu Lee and I had come to regret only one thing---the wearing of our hats---for our faces were nearly blistered from contact with the wind."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 8 – Two Mississippi Land Transactions by

James Castleberry

"Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."

---- Mark Twain

 

 

The first land transaction1 by James Castleberry in Mississippi occurred in November 1840, probably not long after his arrival in Tishomingo County. This was the purchase of 480 acres from Wade and Margaret Blassingame for $800.00 and was witnessed by James Moore and Jackson Akers, his son-in-law. This land in Tishomingo County was described as follows: E1/2 S6 and NE ¼ S7, all at R11E, T3

A much later land transaction on 1 September 18512 is particularly interesting. It describes the sale for $4000.00 of presumably all of James Castleberry’s property (800 acres) to his wife eight years before his death! Perhaps he did so expecting to soon die? The deed states that Elizabeth received about a dozen Negro slaves that were originally from the proceeds of her father’s estate. NOTE: Her father, James Carroll, died almost forty years earlier in Jackson County, Georgia, around 1813. Other belongings were listed as: two mules, three horses, four yoke of oxen, one crib of corn, eight beds, furniture, and bedsteads, one bureau, one safe, eleven cows, and two wagons.

The names of the Negro slaves were: Hardy, Alexander, Delphia and her children, Jerry and Echlip, Cherry and her two children, Harriet and Stepheson, and Susan.

Chapter 9 - Children of James and Elizabeth Castleberry

"When we do the best that we can, we never know what

miracle is wrought in our life, or in the life of another."

----Helen Keller

 

 

1. James Castleberry, Jr., was born in Jackson County, Georgia, on 5 May 1817 and he died around 1895. He was elected constable of Eastport, Mississippi, on 5 August 18431 and was a member of the Tishomingo County Board of Police. James, Jr. married Elizabeth Tuberville around 1848 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. She was born in Alabama about 1825. According to Federal census records they had the following children:

a) Thomas J. (ca 1849 - ?)

b) Martha A. (ca 1849 - ?)

c) Sarah or Sallie (ca 1853 - ?)

d) Sidney J. (ca 1854 - ?)

f) William H. (ca 1862 - ?)

g) Jamie Ann (ca 1862 - ?)

h) Edwin (ca 1869 - ?)

James Castleberry, Jr. was in the 22nd Mississippi Infantry during the Civil War.2 He and some of his family were still residing in Tishomingo County in 1880 (Federal census). According to Wiltshire3 he died in 1895 and is buried in Yalobusha County, Mississippi.

2. Sarah Castleberry was born in Gwinnett County, Georgia, on 24 Oct 1818 and she died in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, on 11 May 1861. She is buried near Iuka, Mississippi. Her husband was Jackson Akers who she married in Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1837. They moved to Mississippi in 1840 with her parents. In 1849 Jackson Akers was elected a Justice of the Peace in Tishomingo County (District No. 9). He married Mary Barnett on 12 June 1862 after Sarah died on 11 May1861. In the 1870 census Jackson Akers occupation is given as steam mill proprietor. He was living next to his ex-mother-in-law, Elizabeth Castleberry. Living near by was his 29 year old son, John Jefferson, and his family. John Jefferson Akers was born near Iuka, Mississippi, and married Mildred Ann McDaniel.4

3. John Thomas was born in Gwinnett County, Georgia, in 1820 and died on 21 January 1871 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. He married Frances Marion Lee on 10 June 1849. She was born on 18 February 1831 in Alabama and died in Tishomingo County on 27 June 1904. Her father was Nathan Lee and her mother was Catherine Corbin. In the 1860 Federal census John Thomas’s occupation was given as miller but by 1870 he had taken up farming according to the census records. In the 1880 census his widow, Frances, was living with her nineteen year old son, John, and gave her occupation as farmer. Their children were:

As stated above, John Thomas' son, Robert E. Castleberry, married Ophelia Archer. They had a son, John Felix (1884 - 1973), who married Cara Blanche Edwards (1891 - 1958). Their children were: Mary Mayedele, Edward Thurman, John Ted, Gene Neil and James Lynn. John Ted married Billeye Sue Cutshall and they had a son John Ted, Jr.5

4. Cenith (Acena) was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in 1830. She did not marry. She was living with her mother according to the 1860 and 1870 Federal census and with her brother Charlie in 1880. She does not appear in the 1900 census.

5. Nancy was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in 1830.

6. William (my great grandfather) was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in 1830 and died in Pontotoc, Mississippi, in July 1882. He married Annie Rosa Coleman in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, on 27 Jan 1862. More about him in Chapter 10.

7. Thomas C. was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in 1831. He was most likely named after his mother’s younger brother, Thomas Carroll. He married Sarah Alabama Long on 20 April 1858 in what is now Alcorn County, Mississippi. She was born around 1840. According to Edwyna Wackrow6 her parents were probably Henry Dickerson Long and Margaret Counts. Their children were: Oscar, Agnes Mae, Hal, Blanche, Zana,Tom and Earl.7 In the 1860 census Thomas gave his occupation to be lumber trader (the same was given by his younger brother, Winchester, who was living in his household). Thomas was in the Civil War and served in P.D. Roddey's 4th Alabama cavalry. In 1870 he was a steam mill proprietor, according to the census records. Thomas died around 1890.

8. Rufus was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, on 24 March 1832 and died 31 December 1906 in Iuka, Mississippi, where he is buried (Oak Grove Cemetery). Rufus served in the 11th Alabama Cavalry during the Civil War. In 1870 he was farming and living with his mother, according to the census. In 1875 when he was 43 years old he married M. Florrie Matthews. Her father was A. T. Matthews. She was born 8 March 1853 and died 20 October 1878, two days after giving birth to their second child, Hattie. She died on 18 October 1878. Florrie is buried in Iuka at Oak Grove Cemetery beside her parents. Rufus and Florrie’s first child (James A.) was born around 1876. In the 1880 census Rufus was listed as a resident of Iuka and as a store clerk. According to Coker8 he was the Iuka town marshal from 1894 to 1896. In the 1900 census his occupation was given as the Iuka town marshal.

9. Elizabeth was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in 1832. She married William Maddox on 6 Apr 1859. Surety for their marriage bond was William D. Castleberry, probably her older brother. NOTE: If so it is the only record I have found giving his middle initial.

10. Mary C. was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, about 1834. She was living with her brother, Charles, and sisters, Cenith and Nina, in 1880 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

11. Nina (also called Permilia) was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in December 1836. She died in Iuka, Mississippi, in 1909. She never married.

12. Winchester was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, about 1838. He was in the lumber business before the Civil War. He died on 14 Oct 1864 in a Richmond, Virginia, hospital from wounds received during fighting near Petersburg, Virginia. I do not know where he is buried.

13. Riley was born in DeKalb County, Georgia, in October 1838. He was killed when thrown from a horse on 19 April 1852 and is buried beside his parents in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery near Iuka, Mississippi.

14. Charles C. was born in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in March 1841. He served in Roddey’s Cavalry during the Civil War and was elected First Sergeant. He was twice elected Sheriff (1874 and again on 6 November 1877) of Tishomingo County.9 According to the Confederate Magazine10 he served under Colonel W. A. Johnson and surrendered with General Forrest at Gainesville, Alabama. After the war he married Henrietta M. Hyndman (30 March 1849 - 30 March 1877) of Corinth, Mississippi. They had at least two children, Robbie (19 April 1872 - 24 October 1875) and Henrietta, born around 1877. Henrietta married J. P. Houk about 1899 and was living in Aberdeen, Mississippi, in 1909. Both Robbie and Henrietta are buried in Iuka, Mississippi. In the 1900 census Charles C. Castleberry was living with his sister, Nina, in Iuka. He filed a Civil War pension application in 1907. Charles died "suddenly" in New Albany, Mississippi, on 16 September 1909.11 His obituary in the Iuka, Mississippi, newspaper, the Vidette, concluded with the following sentences:

The coffin arrived on the train at 1:17 p.m. and was carried to the Castleberry home. Rev. O.L. Savage conducted funeral. At grave a talk was made by G.P. HAMMERY, who was a war comrade. Thus was laid to rest a man with a checkered career - a man who had his faults and his virtues. Let us remember his virtues.

15. Georgia A. was born in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, on 10 February 1846 and died in Iuka, Mississippi, on 24 May 1882. She married James Walmsley (14 February 1830 - 9 December 1885). They are both buried in Iuka, Mississippi. The Walmsley children, John Walmsley , James Walmsley, William Walmsley , and Mary Walmsley were living in Iuka, Mississippi, with their aunt Nina in 1900, according to the census.

16. John W. was born in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, on 20 August 1846 and died there on 15 October 1846. He is buried in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery near Iuka, Mississippi. NOTE: John W. Castleberry was born six months after his sister Georgia! Obviously some birth dates are incorrect.

 

Chapter 10 - William Castleberry (The Honest Merchant of Pontotoc)

(1830 - 1882)

"We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But the ocean would be less because of that missing drop."

----Mother Teresa

William Castleberry, my great grandfather, was ten years old when he arrived in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in 1840 with his parents (James and Elizabeth Castleberry) and his twelve brothers and sisters from DeKalb County, Georgia. He was born in 1830 (his military service record gave his age as 35 in June 1865 when he was released from the Camp Chase Civil War prison in Columbus, Ohio). He died on 15 July 1882 in Pontotoc, Mississippi, at the age of 52. His name appears in several Tishomingo County land deeds in the 1850’s and he was also in the saloon business for a time in Eastport, Mississippi.1

He evidently moved to Pontotoc, Mississippi, in the early 1860’s since it was there that he met and soon married Annie Rosa Coleman on 27 Jan 1862, according to their marriage bond. However, in her last Civil War pension application in 1923 (when she was 82 years old and living with her daughter in Lafayette County, Mississippi) she stated that she was married in Lafayette County, Mississippi.

One year later, in February 1863, William, along with two of his brothers, Charles C. and Thomas, enlisted in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry. William rose through the ranks to become a Sergeant by the time he was captured by Union forces in 1864.

His military service record states that he was captured near Huntsville, Alabama, on 23 December 1864, by forces under the command of Major General Thomas, Department of the Cumberland. In Charles Rice’s paperback book2 about the Civil War in North Alabama there is a brief account of a skirmish near Huntsville on Indian Creek on 23 December 1864, where 48 Confederates were captured. Undoubtedly William Castleberry was one of the captured Confederates. Rice’s book says, "The wounded men were badly cut up with saber cuts, as it was a hand-to-hand fight, and the enemy says the young Rebels fought bravely".

He was first sent to a Civil War prison in Louisville, Kentucky, and then in March 1865 to Camp Chase, Ohio (Columbus). He was paroled on 13 June 1865 after taking an oath of allegiance to the United States.

According to information in William’s 1865 military service record he had blue eyes, dark hair, fair complexion, and was 5 feet, 9 and 3/4 inches tall.

After the war William returned to Pontotoc, Mississippi, and opened a dry goods store where he and his father-in-law, Daniel T. Coleman, were partners.

In the 1870 and 1880 census for Pontotoc, Mississippi, William Castleberry’s occupation was given as merchant (dry goods). In 1880 his seventy-five year-old mother-in-law (Clarinda Ann Coleman) was living with the family, according to the census.

William Castleberry joined the Baptist Church of Pontotoc on 12 July 1879 (a Saturday) according to the church minutes.3

The minutes say "after sermon by Eld Lewis Ball (of Blue Mountain, Mississippi) Wm Castlebury (spelling used by the church clerk) and Miss Sue Allen presented themselves as converts and after relating their change of heart and desires to unite with us were unanimously rec’d into our Christian fellowship as fit subjects for baptism". Four days later Pastor A. J. Seal baptized them at 4 p.m. on 16 July 1879 (a Wednesday).

From the church minutes it is plain that meetings usually took place on Saturday (Sunday is rarely mentioned as a meeting day—I don’t know why) and revivals (referred to as a series of meetings) lasted for at least a week and sometimes longer. Each day during a revival held in July 18794 there was a prayer meeting at 10 a.m. and preaching at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m.! Quite different from today.

By 1879, when William joined the church, he had been living in Pontotoc for fourteen years (since his 1865 return from Camp Chase--the Civil War prison in Columbus, Ohio) and it is odd that during all this time he apparently felt no need or desire to join. His wife (baptized in 1865 along with two of her sisters, Emma F. Weatherall and Nettie M. Coleman)5 and her family were long-time members. Also, William’s father-in-law (Daniel T. Coleman) was a "pillow" of the church. But William Castleberry did not cast his lot with the church until he was 49 years old.

After becoming a member William took an active role in the affairs of the church. He was frequently appointed to committees to attend to various church activities. On 14 December 1879 he was appointed to a committee to notify the colored church [members] that it was not convenient to rent them the church for 1880.6 From time-to-time he also made financial contributions to special church needs.

The children of William and Annie Castleberry were probably all born in Pontotoc, Mississippi. Seven of the eight (one died very young) are listed below:

Clara (b Apr. 1866)

Mary L. (b Mar 1871)

Ann E. (b ca 1871)

William C. (b Mar 1873)

Robert L. (b Sept. 1874)

Florence (b Mar 1875)

Charles Rufus (b 24 Oct. 1878, d 21 July

1963--my grandfather)

William Castleberry’s will is dated 15 July 1882.7 In it he names his wife (Anna R. Castleberry) as the executrix and to her he wills all of his real estate, household and kitchen furniture and all stock and cattle. Finally he asks that she secure the assistance of W. R. Peguis (fellow church member who was "excommunicated" in 1883)8 in the management of his estate. William’s brother (Rufus) from Tishomingo County, Mississippi, was a witness.

William died on the same day that his will was written (15 July 1882), according to the Proof of Will court records dated 5 Sept 1882. The estimated value of his store merchandise was $10,000 and his debts were estimated to be between $4,000 and $5,000. His widow petitioned the court to allow her to set apart a sufficient sum of money from the estate to support herself and her children for one year.

William Castleberry is buried in the city cemetery in Pontotoc, Mississippi. His tombstone inscription incorrectly says that he died in 1885. It also has the inscription: "THE HONEST MERCHANT OF PONTOTOC".

 

Chapter 11 - Annie Rosa Coleman Castleberry

(1840 - ca 1925)

(Wife of William Castleberry)

"The job of passing civilization along from one generation to the next ought to be the highest honor anyone could have" – "Where Have All the Leaders Gone?" by Lee Iacocca, 2007, p. 217

 

 

Annie Rosa Coleman Castleberry’s (1840 - ca 1925) family came to Mississippi from Coweta County, Georgia. She states in her Civil War pension applications that she "has lived in Mississippi all her life". The Coleman family apparently arrived in Mississippi around 1842, assuming "all her life" did not actually include being born in Mississippi. In 1852 her family moved to Pontotoc, Mississippi, and it was there that the Coleman children grew to adulthood. She had four older brothers and five sisters, two older than herself. In Mississippi Annie Rosa Coleman probably first lived in Chickasaw County and then in Pontotoc County. In 1862 she married William Castleberry. She died around 1925 in Lafayette County, Mississippi.

Her father, Daniel T. Coleman (ca 1800 - 7 Jul 1873), was a farmer, merchant, and in the 1830’s while living in Morgan County, Georgia, a justice of the peace. His wife, Clarinda Ann Randle (1804 - ca 1885), was also from Georgia.

Annie Coleman’s oldest sister was Emma F. who first married R. A. Weatherall on 8 March 1859 and later, after he died about 1874, she married Major Henry C. Medford of Tupelo, Mississippi (a lawyer and the town’s first mayor). Emma had two daughters by both husbands.

Annie Coleman’s youngest sister, Mary Adeline (Mary Lina) married Memory Gordon Leake 3 September 1871. Adeline and Memory both died during the yellow fever epidemic in the summer of 1877 leaving a three-year-old son, Memory E. Leake, who was adopted and raised by Emma and Major Medford. An interesting account of Memory E. Leake’s long and useful life has been recorded by Julius Garnett Berry.1 In this biography mention2 is made of Memory riding all the way from Tupelo to Pontotoc on a new pony named Minnie that he received from his stepfather, Major Medford, to visit his Aunt Annie Castleberry and her family. He was only six or seven years old at the time and did this to please his stepfather who rewarded him by giving him the pony.

Emma Medford died in 1885 when Memory was only eleven years old. At the insistence of his lawyer stepfather Memory enrolled at the University of Mississippi where he completed his law degree in 1895. The legal profession did not suit him and he soon got into the hardware and lumber business where he succeeded handsomely eventually becoming a prosperous and prominent citizen in his hometown of Tupelo. He was a life long member of the Baptist Church in that city.

Memory was the first cousin of my grandfather, Charles Rufus Castleberry. They were born four years apart and grew up in towns twenty miles apart. Stories have been handed down about how Memory was partly raised by my great grandmother, Annie Coleman Castleberry, after his Aunt Emma died in 1885 when he was eleven years old.

Annie Coleman was married to William Castleberry in Lafayette County, Mississippi, according to her last Civil War pension application that she filed in 1923. However, it is more likely that she was married in Pontotoc County since her marriage bond was issued there on 27 Jan 1862. During her marriage she resided in Pontotoc, Mississippi, with her husband who was a merchant. When he died in July 1882 she was left with seven children, the youngest, Charles Rufus (my grandfather) was only three years old.

According to the minutes3 of the First Baptist Church of Pontotoc Annie R. Castleberry, Nettie M. Coleman, and Emma F. Weatherall were received for baptism in 1865. Also that year a colored man and two colored women (Willie Barr, Lucinda Wilson, and Ann Conkey) were received for baptism. Mrs. Mary Lina Leake, formerly Mary Lina Coleman, was dismissed from the church by letter in January 1872.

Thirty-one years later on 14 June 1896 the Pontotoc church minutes further state that the following Castleberry’s were granted letters of removal: Mrs. A. R. Castleberry, Mary Castleberry, Florence Castleberry, Robert Castleberry, and Charlie Castleberry (my grandfather). They moved from Pontotoc to Aberdeen, Mississippi a few months earlier since according to records at the First Baptist Church of Aberdeen, Mississippi [e-mail on 16 May 2007 from Judy Jones—jjones7487@hotmail.com] Annie Castleberry and her family (Florence, Robert E. Charles R. and Mary) joined the Aberdeen church by letter on 29 March 1896. Some of their names appear on the Aberdeen church records until 1918 (records not found for 1919 through 1921). By 1922 no Castleberry names were appearing on the Aberdeen church records. Actually, three of these four Castleberry children had moved and were married by 1909 (Charles in 1905, Florence in 1907, and Robert in 1909). I do not know who or when Mary was married. Three Castleberry children were missing from the Aberdeen church records. They were: Clara, William, and Annie.

This move to Aberdeen, Mississippi was made 14 years after the death of Annie Castleberry’s husband, William. Why she picked Aberdeen is not known. Probably it was mainly in search of a place with a more thriving economy.

In 1896, on arriving in Aberdeen, Annie Castleberry opened a boarding house on Washington Street. In the 1900 census she is listed as head-of-the-household with nine boarders, six of them being her own children (missing was Ann or Annie, the third oldest daughter). Also under her roof were her three granddaughters, the children of Clara Roberts, the oldest daughter, who was a widow. William, the oldest son, was an insurance agent, Robert was a dry goods salesman, and Charles Rufus, my grandfather, was a grocery salesman, according to the census records.

In 1900, at the age of 59, Annie Castleberry filed the first of four Civil War pension applications for service by her husband, William Castleberry. By 1912, when she was 70 years old, Annie Castleberry had moved to Lafayette County, Mississippi, evidently near Water Valley (she moved before 1907) and was living with her daughter, Florence Anderson, and her family. She filed a second Civil War pension application on 15 August 1912. She gave the value of her property as $500.00. On the 9 August 1916 when she was 75 years old she filed a third pension application giving the value of her property as $150.00. Finally, on 27 June 1923, she filed her fourth and last Civil War pension application when she was 82 years old. She stated that she was an invalid and was residing in Lafayette County, Mississippi, Route 1. Her post office was given as Water Valley, Mississippi. All four pension applications were approved.

I do not know when she died or where she is buried.

 

 

Chapter 12 - Children of William and Annie Castleberry

"Without enthusiasm you are doomed to a life of mediocrity, but with it you can accomplish miracles." --- Og Mandino

 

According to the Federal census records of 1880 William and Annie Castleberry had eight children. All were apparently born in Pontotoc, Mississippi. One died as an infant. The seven other children were:

1. Clara (April 1866 - ___?) married W. W. Roberts on Wednesday, the 30th of April 1890 in Pontotoc County.1 He died before 1900 and Clara and her three daughters lived in Aberdeen, Mississippi, with Annie Castleberry for some time afterwards. The three daughters were:

Julian Maude (July 1891 - ?)

Anna L. (October 1892 - ?)

Mary W. (January 1894 - ?)

By 1910 Clara Roberts and her three daughters had moved to Webster County (Eupora, Mississippi) and were renting a house on Durrar (?) Street. Clara was a "keeper" at the Eupora Hotel. A John Kolb (or Kobb) was a boarder in the household with Clara and her daughters. He was a divorced 48-year-old dentist. Clara was 44 years old and her daughters were teenagers. No trace of Clara Roberts has been found in the 1920 census (she would have been 54 years old). Perhaps she married the dentist and moved to another state.

2. Mary Lina (Mar 1871 - __?__) was named after her mother’s sister. Mary Lina joined the Aberdeen Baptist church on 29 March 1896 [16 May 2007 e-mail from Judy Jones] and she was granted a letter of removal from the Pontotoc Baptist Church on 14 June 1896.2

3. Annie E. (ca 1871- __?___) was baptized at the Pontotoc Baptist Church on 11 December 1886.3 Her name does not appear in the 1900 Federal census, so perhaps she was married by then.

4. William C. (Mar 1873 - ___? __) was a member of the Pontotoc Baptist Church until he was expelled on 10 November 1895 due to his deportment.4 By 1900 he was living in Aberdeen, Mississippi, in his mother’s boarding house and his occupation was given as insurance agent. He evidently moved to Durant, Mississippi, around 1901 since he was married there in May 1901. William’s wife was Mary Cora Reed. The Rev. J. H. Smith married them on Wednesday, the 29th of May 1901 in Durant. She was born in Mississippi in 1885 and was the stepdaughter of Edward C. Shive, a farmer and head of the household. Edward’s wife was Celia Ann. They were both born in South Carolina.

In the 1910 census William was living on Madison Street with his in-laws in Durant, Mississippi, and gave his occupation as a grocery store merchant. He had a seven-year-old daughter named Celia L. In the 1920 census William and Mary were still living in Durant, Mississippi. He was the head of a household that included his wife, daughter, and mother-in-law (Celia Ann Shive who was 72 years old). According to the 1930 census William owned a dry goods store and a house valued at $3500.00. The mother-in-law was still in their household in 1930. She was 83 years old and her father was born in Northern Ireland. The daughter was also still living at home and her age was given as 25 years old.

5. Robert L. (Sept. 1874 - ___?__) He joined the Aberdeen, Mississippi Baptist church on 29 March 1896, along with the rest of his family [16 May 2007 e-mail from Judy Jones]. He was married to Cora Rose on Wednesday, the 15th of September 1909 in Yalobusha County. The minister was Alfred D. Castleberry (relationship unknown). No trace of Robert has been found in the 1910 census. Maybe he was out of the state. Apparently Cora Rose died after 1910 since in 1920 and 1930 Robert was living with his sister, Florence, in Lafayette County, Mississippi, according to the census.

6. Florence (May 1875 - ?) was baptized at the Pontotoc Baptist Church with her sister (Annie E.) on 11 December 1886.5 She joined the Aberdeen Baptist Church on 29 March 1896 [16 May 2007 e-mail from Judy Jones] and it was at that time that she moved with her widowed mother and siblings to Aberdeen, Mississippi. On 14 June 1896 she was given a letter of removable from the Pontotoc Baptist church.6 That same year she was teaching school in Smithville near Aberdeen. In 1907 she married Tom M. Anderson (1869 - 1915) from Lafayette County, Mississippi. Tom and Florence were teachers at a "literary school". They taught and lived in Lafayette County, Mississippi, apparently near Water Valley. They had two sons. Robert Howard (1909 - __?__) and Elna Thomas (1914 - __?__). According to the 1910 census Tom and Florence owned and lived in a farmhouse in Lafayette County that was mortgaged. Tom was 41 years old in 1910. He was born in Lafayette, Mississippi, on 15 August 1869 and died on 10 April 1915 (Mississippi death certificate No. 6824). His parents were J. M. Anderson and Ella Wells. According to his death certificate he was buried in the Shipp Cemetery in Lafayette County, Mississippi. Unfortunately a record for this cemetery, compiled in 1978 by the Skipwith Historical and Genealogical Society,7 does not list him even though his parents are listed. So, perhaps his gravestone is missing.

In the 1920 census Florence was 43 years old and was listed as head of the household. She was still living in Lafayette County and in her household were her two sons, Robert and Thomas, her mother Annie Coleman Castleberry (age 79) and her brother Robert L. Castleberry (age 41). Both Florence and her brother listed farming as their primary occupation. Annie Coleman Castleberry (mistakenly, I think) listed her parents as born in South Carolina (they moved to Mississippi from Georgia around 1842). In the 1930 census the only change was the absence of Annie Coleman Castleberry so she evidently died between 1923 and 1930.

7. Charles Rufus (24 Oct. 1878 - 21 July 1963) was my grandfather (see Chapter 13). He married Eliza King in Durant, Mississippi, on 25 Jan 1905 (a Wednesday).8 The minister was J. P. Hickman. She was born in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 24 May 1883 and died 7 Nov. 1959 in Moorhead, Mississippi. Her father was Tom King (10 Jan 1850 - 31 Dec 1935) and her mother was Annie Montgomery (11 Sept. 1859 - 16 Nov. 1898). They were both born in Holmes County. In the 1910 census Charles Rufus Castleberry was living in Durant, Mississippi, with his wife and two children (Charles King, age 2 and a daughter Annie Frances, age 10 months--my mother). Also living with him were his wife’s sisters, Annie King, age 20, and Ellen King, age 14. Charles Rufus’ profession was given as manager of an ice plant. The family was renting a house on Mulberry Street. In the 1920 census he was still living in Durant. He had a third child, Thomas Coleman, who was 6 years old. His sister-in-law, Ellen King, was still under his roof. In 1922 Charles Rufus Castleberry moved his family to the bustling little town of Moorhead in the Mississippi Delta. He actually arrived in Moorhead in 1919 and commuted home on weekends on the train between Durant and Moorhead until 1922. The first year in Moorhead they all lived in the Phoenix Hotel while the Castleberry house was being built on the northwest corner of East Cherry and Walnut streets (in the early 1960’s it was sold, demolished and replaced by another house). All of the Castleberry children grew to adulthood in Moorhead. Eliza died in Moorhead in 1959 and Charles Rufus died there in 1963. Both are buried in Durant, Mississippi (Mizpah Cemetery).

Their children were:

a) Charles King (28 Oct 1907 - 31 Aug 1986). He is buried in Vicksburg, Mississippi (Green Acres Memorial Park).

b) Annie Frances (12 Jul 1909 - 6 Oct 1969). (my mother). She is buried in Vicksburg, Mississippi (Green Acres Memorial Park).

c) Thomas Coleman (8 Dec 1913 - 9 July 1989). He is buried in Moorhead, Mississippi.

 

Chapter 13 - Charles Rufus Castleberry

(1878 - 1963)

"Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please."

--- Mark Twain

 

My maternal grandfather was Charles Rufus Castleberry (24 Oct. 1878 - 21 July 1963). He was a deacon in the Moorhead, Mississippi, Baptist Church although he never attended Sunday School since he thought of that as an activity for children. In politics he was conservative however I suspect he voted for Franklin Roosevelt like just about everybody else. He was a good businessman. He loved to play practical jokes on his children and on us grandchildren. Big Daddy, which we shortened to "Bick" was an early riser, never needing an alarm clock. The morning light and the birds singing woke him, he would say.

Charles Rufus Castleberry was born in Pontotoc, Mississippi, on 24 October 1878. NOTE: A birth date of 6 October 1878 is on his tombstone, however, his 1918 WWI draft record and his Social Security application, which he signed on 9 March 1937, both give his birth date as 24 October 1878. I think the October 24 date is more likely correct.

In Pontotoc, Mississippi, the Castleberry clan belonged to the Pontotoc Baptist Church where Charles Rufus was baptized (Friday -- 23 June 1893) when he was 14 years old.1 His father, William Castleberry, who died in 1882 when Charles Rufus was only three years old, was a merchant in Pontotoc in business with his father-in-law, Daniel T. Coleman (1800 – 1873).

Charles Rufus had two brothers and two sisters, all older than him. He never completed more than about six years of schooling. After my Big Daddy’s father died, his mother, Annie Coleman Castleberry, with five young children ranging in age from 3 to 16 years old, continued to farm and run the family store for another fourteen years.

In 1896 (when my Big Daddy was 18 years old) Annie Castleberry sold the store and moved to Aberdeen, Mississippi. She probably moved there because her eldest daughter (Florence) had secured a teaching job in Smithville, a community near Aberdeen and too Aberdeen was a very bustling place around this time. From 1861 to 1891 Aberdeen was the largest town (population) in Mississippi. In 1896 it was a place enjoying great prosperity and much commerce. A 1900 street scene in Aberdeen that was surely familiar to Charles Rufus Castleberry and his family is shown below.

The deed to the Aberdeen boarding house the family lived in was not in Annie Castleberry’s name but rather in the name of two of her daughters, Florence and Mary. So, Annie Castleberry was running a boarding house on Washington Street in Aberdeen in 1900.

During the last part of Bick’s growing up years (from age 18 to about age 24) he lived in Aberdeen, Mississippi. According to the 1900 census, he was 22 years old, working in a grocery store in Aberdeen, and living at his mother’s boarding house on Washington Street with his siblings.

Not long afterwards he went to work for the United States Post Office Department as a railway mail clerk on a run from Memphis to Vicksburg. His home base was Memphis, Tennessee and when in Vicksburg, Mississippi he sometimes spent the night in the old railroad depot, which was still standing in 2002 on Levee Street next to the sea wall that protects the city during periods of high water on the Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers. Among Bick’s fondest memories and oft repeated stories were the ones about the times the train would have to stop until the bears could be chased off the track. His days as a railway mail clerk left him with a lifelong love for railroading. I remember the times in the 1940’s when my brother (Tomberry) and I would listen to him talk in the most fascinating way about the speed and splendor of the crack passenger trains of the day like the Panama Limited (first run in 1942) and the City of New Orleans that passed through Mississippi on their way north and south between Chicago and New Orleans. In his mind they were the quintessential example of the country’s progress in commerce and transportation. Like the steamboats in earlier days, the railroads captivated the spirit of adventure and romance in his mind. My grandfather’s life coincided with this exciting railroad era.

Around 1903 Bick left the railroad and took a job as a post office clerk in Durant, Mississippi. John W. Lockhart was the postmaster. His future brother-in-law, John M. King, was probably another postal employee since John became the Durant postmaster in 1913. Very likely John introduced Charlie to his sister, Eliza. In any event while working at the post office Charlie (Bick) met and later married Eliza King. Their wedding took place on a Wednesday, the 25th of January 1905, the coldest January day my grandmother ever knew -- so she often said. After the wedding and the customary festivities the new bride and groom retired, each to their respective domiciles. They could not yet afford a place of their own, so Granny said.

On 25 June 1907 Bick presented himself for membership at the Durant First Baptist Church (this was two and ½ years after his marriage to Eliza King in that church). His church letter arrived on 26 July 1907 probably from the Baptist Church in Aberdeen, Mississippi. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church]

My Big Daddy left the postal service around 1907 and went into the coal and ice business in Durant. He was in that business in 1910, according to the census. My mother often talked about the pleasure she got from eating ice cream at her daddy’s ice plant when she was a small girl in Durant.

My mother always said that Bick and Granny were given a house as a wedding present by Granny’s father (Tom King). But, according to the Federal census Bick and Granny were renting a house in Durant in 1910. However, ten years later (according to the 1920 census) they were owners of a house in Durant that was mortgage free. Maybe Tom King’s generous gift did not occur until after 1910.

In 1919, after his Durant coal and ice plant was destroyed by fire, Bick decided to move to Moorhead, Mississippi, where he established himself in the same business (in Moorhead his ice plant was located behind the Baptist church and near the railroad tracks). Temporarily leaving his family behind in Durant, he commuted on the railroad for a couple of years until his wife and three children joined him at the local hotel (The Phoenix) where they all lived for about a year (until about 1922) while the family home was being completed on the northwest corner of E. Cherry and Walnut Streets (the front faced south toward the Junior College).

The records of the First Baptist Church of Durant, Mississippi, show that the Castleberry Family moved their membership in November 1922. The family members were: C. R. Castleberry, Mrs. C. R. Castleberry, C. K. Castleberry, and Annie F. Castleberry (my mother who was 13 years old at that time). [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church]

Another fire destroyed Bick’s ice and coal business in Moorhead several years later. By 1930 (according to the Federal census) he was in the oil and gasoline business where he became the distributor in Moorhead for the Gulf Oil Company. Later, around 1935, he became the distributor for the Lion Oil Company and was the owner of a Lion Oil Service Station (located on south side of W. Washington Street and the east bank of the Moorhead Bayou).

Starting in 1925 and continuing through 1941 Bick served several times on the Moorhead Board of Alderman.2

In 1951 at the age of seventy-three he went into the mercantile business (country store) in Blaine, Mississippi. He commuted from Moorhead each day about 20 miles round trip six days a week! This final venture ended in failure after about five years forcing Bick to retire. He lived another seven years departing this world on 21 July 1963 at the age of eighty-four. Charles Rufus Castleberry is buried beside his wife in the Mizpah Cemetery in Durant, Mississippi.

The children (seven generations after the German immigrant Henry Castleberry) of Charles Castleberry and Eliza King were:

 

 

 

Chapter 14 - Eliza King Castleberry

(1883 - 1959)

"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world."----- Albert Einstein, 1879-1955

 

My grandmother (or Granny), Eliza King Castleberry, was born in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 24 May 1883 (at Blue Mountain College she gave her age in the June 1900 Federal census for Tippah County, Mississippi, as 17 making the 1882 date on her tombstone in error). She was undoubtedly named after her father’s mother, Eliza Shipp King, who died in 1883. Eliza King Castleberry had two sisters and four brothers. Her two sisters, Annie and Ellen, I knew from frequent family visits. I never knew her brothers. According to a family story, one brother, I believe Thomas, killed a man during a dispute in a poker game and escaped to South America to avoid prosecution. Very little was ever said about this. In fact not much was ever said about any of Granny’s brothers. It was always regarded as too sensitive a subject for discussion.

Granny’s mother, Annie Montgomery King, died in 1898 at age 39 leaving seven children ranging in age from four to twenty. Granny was fifteen years old and the oldest daughter, therefore on her shoulders fell much of the burden of caring for the family. She often said that she raised her younger brothers and sisters, her own three children, and two of her grandsons (me and Tomberry).

Granny’s father, Thomas Rhorea King, was born in 1850 in Holmes County, Mississippi, and died at the age of 85 on New Years Eve 1935. He married Annie Montgomery in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 21 December 1876 (after she died in 1898 he was remarried to Elma Merritt in 1902). The King family home was outside Durant and was owned by the Howard family after my great-grandfather died. It burned to the ground around 1970. A local artist using photographs of the house did a portrait in 1989.

Granny was baptized in June 1899 at Durant’s First Baptist Church. She was 16 years old. Six years later she was married in the same church. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church]

Granny attended Blue Mountain Female College in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, (Tippah County). She was enrolled there in June 1900.1 She may have graduated in 1901. She was fond of recalling how when she went to college the students arrived on the train in the fall and remained there until Christmas vacation. Then, on returning after the Christmas break, they remained until the school year was completed.

Around 1904 Eliza King met Charlie Castleberry. He worked at the post office with Eliza’s older brother, John. Charlie and Eliza were married at the First Baptist Church in Durant on a Wednesday, the 25th of January 1905, the coldest January day my grandmother ever knew---so she often said. In South Africa on this date the worlds largest gem diamond, later named Cullinan (3106 carets), was found. I doubt that this discovery was of much interest to the newly weds. After the wedding and the customary festivities the new bride and groom retired, each to their respective domiciles. They could not yet afford a place of their own, so Granny said.

Granny was a strict disciplinarian and frugal to a degree that is scarcely conceivable today. She would bleach the large cloth signs advertising Pennzoil motor oil (which she got from Bick’s service station) and make underwear for Tomberry (my brother) and me. Tomberry laughingly told this story years later to a group of fellow students in a dormitory room one cold winter night at Mississippi Delta Community College adding that when he would turn his underpants inside-out the picture of oil cans could still be plainly seen!

Granny’s moral habits were Victorian. She was an extremely domineering person and was fairly intolerant of those whose morals did not conform to a straight and honest pattern of living.

She always spoke of her ancestors in glowing terms, especially her father, Tom King. She had a tremendous amount of pride in her family heritage and generally thought that the flat landed Mississippi Delta where she lived the last 40 years of her life was a backwater region of the state compared to her beloved Holmes County in the Mississippi hill country.

I never heard her utter a profane word or knew her to partake of any alcoholic beverages except once when on the advice of the Moorhead physician, Dr. Lynch, she drank a glass of beer nightly just before retiring to increase her weight and provide a more restful sleep. This she did for several months quitting when the desired results did not occur. She had several odd remedies for her medical problems. For example, she always slept with an old high heel shoe pushed against her side at night to prevent "gas pains." Many times I have seen her gag herself with her fingers to force herself to throw-up to get relief when she had an upset stomach. She often used a muster plaster on her chest for exactly what ailment I don’t remember. She and Bick always took a pinch of senna leaves at night before retiring.

She always referred to her husband and my grandfather (Bick) as "Mr. Castleberry", even when speaking with him face to face.

She was a staunch member of the Moorhead Baptist Church. The Women’s Missionary Union was her special interest. She made a remark a few years before she died that I have always thought curious in view of her many years of devotion to church work. Some one brought up the subject of the life hereafter. To this Granny remarked that "she had done all that she could for the Lord and if that was not enough she guessed she would just have to go the bad place".

Granny had a very keen intellect. She loved to read and received many hours of pleasure playing the card game solitaire. She was an expert seamstress. In my early years most of my clothes were made by her. She had a Singer sewing machine that was powered with a foot petal. She took a lot of pride in the fact that she not only raised three children of her own but two grandchildren (my brother, Tomberry and me) as well. The two of us lived with Granny and Bick from 1938 to 1946 (from the time she was 55 to 63 years old and I was 3 to 11 years old).

Granny died in her sleep in November 1959 after suffering for several years from Parkinson disease. She is buried beside her husband in Durant, Mississippi, in the Mizpah Cemetery.

 

 

Chapter 15 - James C. Castleberry of Yalobusha County,

Mississippi (1819 – 1885)

"The great use of a life is to spend it for something that will outlast it."

----- William James

 

James C. Castleberry was a fifth generation Castleberry, the same as my gg-grandfather, James Castleberry, who came to Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in 1840 from DeKalb County, Georgia. I do not know if these two James Castleberry’s were acquainted. They shared a common ancestor several generations back in William Castleberry, Sr. whose wife was Margaret Davis. Apparently James C. Castleberry arrived in Monroe County, Mississippi, in the 1840s since he first appears in the Mississippi census in 1850.

James C. Castleberry was born in Warren County, Georgia, on 18 November 1819 and died in Yalobusha County, Mississippi, on 19 July 1885.1 His parents were Solomon Castleberry and Rebecca Lovett Castleberry. Solomon’s father was Paul Castleberry (his wife was Susannah Beyer). Paul Castleberry was the son of William Castleberry, Sr. whose wife was Margaret Davis. William Castleberry, Sr. was the son of Henry Castleberry the immigrant who arrived in America around 1683.

James C. Castleberry had a sister, Mahala, who married John Jackson Jeffreys in Morgan County, Alabama, on 28 September 1826. James also had a brother, William, who married Eliza Lavinia Nix on 20 January 1847 in Monroe County, Mississippi. William was a sergeant in the Civil War and died in July 1862. His fellow soldiers buried him beside the road between Grenada and Water Valley, Mississippi. William was born in either Morgan or Walker County, Alabama. He lived in Monroe and Calhoun Counties, Mississippi.2

James first married Louisa Jane Johnson on 14 October 1847. She apparently soon died for on 10 January 1850 he married Mary Maria Nolen. Sometime before 1860 he was married for the third time to Martha Seleta Mattox. To this marriage was born around 1862 a daughter, Mary Sarena. Martha died 12 January 1863 and around 1869 James Castleberry was married for the fourth and last time to Sarah Marshall, a widower who was born in South Carolina in 1829, with a daughter Virginia (1852 - ???) and a son, Thomas (1854 - ??). In 1870 James and Sarah had a daughter of their own named Jessica.3

James lived in Walker County, Alabama, and sometime before 1850 he migrated to Mississippi. He is listed in the 1850 Monroe County, Mississippi, Federal census as a wagon maker and in the 1860, 1870 and 1880 Mississippi Federal census as a farmer. He was also somewhat of a blacksmith according to stories handed down. He was a Baptist minister and is listed as such on numerous Yalobusha County marriage records from 1873 to 1883. According to Fox and Stidham4 he was a school teacher and a cotton ginner. He organized a country school near Water Valley, Mississippi. One of the first, it was called the Castleberry School for several years. James donated the land, built the school and taught the classes. The land was still in the family in 1972, belonging to his grandson, Roy Fly.5 In 1860 and 1870 he lived in Calhoun County, Mississippi, before moving to Yalobusha County in the early 1870s. He bought and sold numerous tracts of land in Yalobusha County beginning in 1873 and continued to do so until around 1884. In August 1877 he bought a section of land (640 acres) from R. H. Johnson in Yalobusha County, Mississippi, located three miles west of Water Valley on the Coldwater Road (now State Hwy 32).

James Castleberry gave 160 acres of his land to his oldest daughter, Sarena (also referred to as Rena) when she married J. D. Gordon on 4 January 1883. They lived in a white house trimmed in green. A long porch went across the front of the house and the kitchen was separated from the main house but connected by a covered porch. In the summer when the weather was hot the family ate on this porch.6

James Castleberry died on 19 July 1885 and he is buried in Shiloh Cemetery7 (presumably the one near Water Valley in Yalobusha County).

His will was filed for probate on 31 July 1885 in Yalobusha County.8 In it he left one-third of his estate to his wife, Sarah, and one-third each to his daughters, Sarena Gordan, and Jessica Castleberry. The executor of his will was his esteemed friend, David B. Hervey.

Jessica married Lucius Rawles Fly (1861 - 1931) in Yalobusha County on 30 October 1889. They had a son, Roy, who died in 1977. Jessica died in ??? and Rawles later married Prudence E. Clowney.

Virginia (called Miss Jennie), James Castleberry's stepdaughter, married Jonathan Carr Burns (1849 - ???) in 1880. Jonathan's first wife, Lucy Jane Fly, had died in childbirth in 1876. James Castleberry gave Virginia and Jonathan 160 acres of his land. They had two sons and two daughters. One daughter was born in Oxford, Mississippi, in 1914. Her name was Kelby or "Kate". She moved from Oxford to the Castleberry Farm near Water Valley when she was not quite three years old. She married John Stanley Tyler and today (1998) lives in Arlington, Virginia. She is the author of "The Boy Across the River", a novel about a journey from Virginia to Mississippi in the nineteenth century. She, along with her two brothers, grew up on the 160 acres of land in Yalobusha County given to her father and mother by James Castleberry. She heard her father speak of Mr. Castleberry hundreds of times when she was growing up. Kate goes on to say more about James C. Castleberry: "he loved trees and tried to have at least one of each specie on his farm; he was a friend to the Indians and, being a blacksmith, would take the metal part off the butt of their guns and (for payment) would put their gold in the hollow of the butt."

Chapter 16 - Castleberry’s in the Civil War

"Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail."----- Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

William Castleberry, my great grandfather, enlisted in the Confederate Army in February 1863, when he was 32 years old. He was discharged in June 1865. He ended up in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry (sometimes also called Burtwell’s 10th Cavalry Regiment).

The 11th was with General Forrest in the attack on Athens and Sulphur Trestle, and in the fight at Pulaski, losing very severely in casualties on the expedition. The regiment rendered effective service to General Hood. It was also part of General Roddey’s force at Montevallo, and was in front of Wilson’s column to Selma. At the assault there the 11th was in the trenches and nearly all its men retired there from, as the part of the line held by them was not attacked.

The 11th was reorganized in June 1864 by consolidating Forrest’s Alabama Cavalry Regiment, Warren’s and Williams’s Cavalry Battalions, and newly recruited companies. In early 1865 the 11th was assigned to the District of North Alabama, and to Forrest’s Cavalry Corps (Roddey’s Brigade).1 The regimental officers were Colonel John R. B. Burtwell, Captain John F. Doan and Major Melville W. Sale. William Castleberry rose through the ranks to become a sergeant.

Why did William wait until 1863 to enlist? Although I have found no record he may have served earlier than 1863 and been captured and paroled. Another possible reason for his late enlistment was his romance and marriage in 1862 to Anna R. Coleman.

He was captured near Huntsville, Alabama, on 23 December 1864, by forces under the command of Maj. General Thomas, Department of the Cumberland. In Charles Rice’s paperback book "Hard Times" about the Civil War in North Alabama there is a brief account of a skirmish near Huntsville on Indian Creek on 23 December 1864, where 48 Confederates were captured.2 Most likely William Castleberry was one of the captured 48. Charles Rice says, quoting Mrs. W.D. Chadick’s diary, "the wounded men were badly cut up with saber cuts, as it was a hand-to-hand fight, and the enemy says the young Rebels fought bravely". 3

More complete details of this 1864 skirmish were given by two Union Cavalry Officers from east Tennessee, Lt. John W. Andes and Major Will A. McTeer, in their reminiscences of the war4 written some 15 years later. Lt. Andes’ account is as follows:

On the 23rd day of December 1864, at Huntsville, AL, about 10 o’clock at night some colored people came into camp and informed Col Prosser that there was a force of Confederate cavalry at Indian Creek, seven miles away. [Authors Note: The Confederate camp was west of Huntsville at the intersection of Madison Pike and Indian Creek which now (1999) is in the Huntsville city limits. This particular spot is probably not much changed from the way it was in 1864 except of course Madison Pike is now paved and there is a bridge across Indian Creek.] It was also understood that they intended to attack us the next morning. The colonel had his sergeant major to go around and notify each company commander to have his command in readiness to move at precisely 3 o’clock the next morning. The night was a very cold one, but the orders given were faithfully executed. The ground was frozen hard, and the roads were rough, but daylight found us at Indian Creek.

The enemy’s pickets were found posted on a high hill, overlooking the country all around. As we struck the vedettes we charged upon them, and by the time they reached their camps we were there also, and found a regiment about 390 strong, our strength at the time being exactly 200 men. We found most of them in line of battle, but some were not yet mounted, while the officers were doing all in their power to rally their men. Their force was on the opposite side of the creek from ours, and the creek was very boggy. The only chance to ford was at the ford, and it was pretty well frozen over. On we pushed, across the creek the Confederates attempted to charge us, but some went one way and some another. We pursued them for miles, using out sabers, carbines, and pistols with great effect. The only man hurt on our side was Lt. A.S. Prosser (Co H), who was wounded in the foot.

James A. Smiddy, of Company K, dashed up to a large man weighing 200 pounds, perhaps, mounted on a large horse. Smiddy was only a lad of seventeen years and mounted on a small horse. He ordered the large man to surrender, who turned around and, surveying his youthful adversary, commenced to draw down his gun, replying, "d--n you, I will see you in h---l first". Smiddy was quick enough for him, however, and, leveling a seven-shooter which he held in his hand, shot the man through the head. The large man appeared to leap two feet from his saddle and fell to the ground a dead man. When he fell to the ground he straightened himself upon his back and, after one or two struggles, was gone, and the fighting column passed on without giving him any attention.

I witnessed during the day quite a number of similar cases. We followed the retreating Confederates to Mooresville, [about 15 miles west of Indian Creek] and then returned to Huntsville. The loss to the Confederates was fifty prisoners, fifteen killed, and fifteen mortally wounded. Of the prisoners taken to Huntsville, most of them had been wounded. The citizens of Mooresville told us that about one hundred wounded men had come in there.

Quite a number of those taken back to Huntsville, were private citizens who resided there but who had gone out with the Confederates to induce them to attack us there. The troops were cursing the citizens for getting them into trouble and then running when the heat came. When we returned there was great excitement among the citizens whose friends had been engaged in the fight. The news spread to every part of the city, and on every street women and children could be seen coming to see if any of their husbands had been killed or captured. Our prisoners were marched to the public square, where a guard was placed over them, and in a short time hundreds of women and children had gathered at the scene. Wives were recognizing bleeding husbands, and the sight was anything but pleasant. Their tears and cries furnished a sad picture of real war. Wives were interceding for husbands, and mothers for sons. In some cases their intercessions resulted in the release of their friends, and in others they failed, owing to facts and circumstances.

The Tennessee Union soldiers felt that the Southern people looked upon them with something akin to contempt, and it was no wonder they fought with desperation. Some of the women in Huntsville would stand on the street and say all manner of hard things of us in our presence, knowing that we would not resent it, coming from their sex.

Union Major McTeer’s account of the same incident is as follows:

While at Huntsville, we were threatened constantly. A brigade of Rebel cavalry was in the vicinity and frequently made feints at our pickets. On the morning of December 23, 1864, our command was aroused long before day, a hasty breakfast eaten, and the horses fed and groomed. Then, mounting, we started on the Decatur road. The Tenth Indiana Cavalry was in advance, and Captain Mitchell, a dashing and brave young officer, was in command of the advance guard. Lieut. A.S. Prosser went forward with Capt. Mitchell. We had not proceeded far when the advance struck the Confederate vedettes. The skirmishing was kept up warm and pressed rapidly back, growing stronger at each successive post, until a hot skirmish followed one after another. The main column was kept moving at a trot until about the time day was fairly opened, when the Rebels made such a stand that it was evident they were in force. The morning was excessively cold and piercing, while the roads were frozen hard. Moving at a fast trot, Col. Prossser turned to George House, the bugler, and in his keen, shrill voice, commanded, "Blow the charge, George!" At the same time, he put spurs to his horse and started forward. The bugle did not sound, so the Colonel turned upon his horse and, with an oath, asked, "Why don’t you blow the charge, George?" House had the bugle to his lips, and replied from the side of his mouth, "I will, Colonel, as soon as the bugle thaws!" The mouthpiece was actually frozen to his lips! At length the charge was blown; the Second Cavalry was in the rear; they heard the bugle and knew it. They answered with a yell and started forward past the other commands. We came to the ford at Indian Creek, which was a narrow passage and would admit only a column of fours to pass at a time. The brave Mitchell and A.S. Prosser dashed over the stream with their advance. For some distance in front there was a level plateau, which was half circled by a ridge. On this ridge the Rebel command, some eight hundred strong, took their position, dismounted and armed with long guns. It was a strong place. Our only chance was to make quick work of it. We did not have exceeding two hundred effective men and had to attack their own chosen position. The Indianans had never been fully armed---but [a] few of them had sabers. Major Williamson, who was in command of the Tenth Indiana Cavalry, was a brave man and a good soldier, but he had been an officer in the infantry during the war, up to the time this new regiment was raised, so, crossing the creek, he attempted to form his men in line of battle and stand or advance in order. This would have been suicidal. The Tennesseeans had had more experience, so on they came, screaming and yelling, with drawn sabers, and as they passed the Colonel, almost every man cried out: "Let the Second at them!" At them they went, too. The Indianans caught the spirit, and on they went, clubbing their carbines and using them for sabers. There was not exceeding one hundred shots fired on our side. On went the charge. The Rebels at first kept their line and were stubborn. Our forces rushed up on them with sabers and their line was compelled to give way, and when once broken they became badly demoralized. The strokes with sabers and clubbed carbines went on at a rapid rate for a time. The Rebels retreated in disorder, then followed an exciting chase for several miles. They were crowded and pressing on, trying to get away, yet they kept their colors up. Lieut. John C. Hale, Lieut. John W. Andes, and a few others attempted to capture it, and at one time Lieut. Hale got hold of it, but his horse’s feet, chancing to strike in a mud hole, threw him forward off his balance; the bearer took advantage of it and wrenched the staff from Hale’s hands and succeeded in getting away with it. A fine horse of Lieut. Frank Lythe’s was shot, which dismounted him and made him so angry that he went to using his saber on foot. Lieut. A.S. Prosser, at the first part of the charge, selected him a large, fat Rebel and undertook to saber him. The latter was dismounted, and, seeing Prosser making at him, resisted the attack with a pistol, giving the Lieutenant a painful wound in the foot. It was not enough to stop the fighting Lieutenant. He continued in the saddle and, using his weapon for some time, he became so sick he was compelled to stop.

This was a sweeping charge and a grand victory. We lost one man killed and Lieut. Prosser wounded, while several horses were shot. Their dead was here and there over the ground and along the road for some distance. We captured fifty-four prisoners, and they were the bloodiest men I ever saw. Only three of them were unhurt. They seemed to think a saber would not hurt a man and would not surrender until they had received a blow.

Capt. Mitchell broke or lost his saber and, discharging the loads from his pistol, went on in the chase using the pistol instead of a saber and broke it in two. He put the pieces in his pocket, capturing another, and broke it. So, when he came out of the fight he had a large pocket in his overcoat filled with pieces of pistols.

Capt. T.E. Wallace, the left-handed pistol marksman, brought three of the enemy to the ground. It appeared that he could not point his pistol toward a man without killing him. The Rebels occasionally took to themselves an immense amount of dignity(?) They assumed that it was dishonorable to surrender to one of an inferior rank to themselves. There was a youth in the Second Tennessee Cavalry, James Smiddy by name. He came up with a large man who was a Confederate Captain; seeing that Smiddy was a Private and of youthful appearances, [he] refused to surrender, and attempted to get rid of Smiddy by fight. Smiddy was the wrong man for that. Quick as thought, he drew his pistol and shot the Captain, killing him almost instantly.

After the fight was over, Colonel Prosser and the writer were riding back over the grounds, examining the situation and gathering the scattered forces together. Coming near the ground on which the charge began, a raw soldier of the Indiana command came riding toward us and said he had a prisoner up there, that he was hurt, and he wanted us to tell him whether to take him in. We followed him. Presently coming up to a double log cabin, which was situated at the end of where their line had been on making their stand; on their extreme left, an old woman came running out and, meeting us, exclaimed: "Oh! Colonel! Colonel! I do wish you would kill them; see, they came here and camped, burned all my rails, and left everything exposed to stock." By this time we could hear deep groans coming from the house. The Colonel replied with bitterness: "D____d you, don’t come to me talking about rails when that man is dying in your house! Go and attend to him." He then directed me to follow our Indiana man and see his prisoner. He conducted me to the rugged house, and there was a Confederate soldier, prostrate on the floor with both thighs broken by a mini ball. He was struggling in pain, while death was clearly close at hand. We directed the old lady to wait on him, and left him there. He died the next morning, as we afterwards learned.

Colonel Prosser was very highly complimented on this charge. General Granger declared that he ought to be made a Brigadier General as a reward for it, and the command thought so, too.

The command rested the balance of the day and that night preparatory to further operations.

On the 24th of December, 1864, we moved out from Huntsville, on the Decatur road, stopping for the night on part of the ground over which we had fought in the morning before, near Indian Creek ford.

Author’s Note: Imagine my amazement when I learned that my great grandfather (William Castleberry) was captured in Huntsville in 1864 where I have lived for the past 40 years! The actual skirmish that led to his capture is only a few miles from the Marshall Space Flight Center where I worked all those years! In fact Indian Creek flows along the western part of the Marshall Space Flight Center property on its way to the Tennessee River.

So, on Christmas Day 1864 William found himself a prisoner of war in Huntsville, but very fortunate to be alive. He was probably held in the Memphis and Charleston train depot (still standing) since it was used during the war as a temporary holding place for captured Confederate prisoners. His military record shows that he was first sent to a military prison in Louisville, Kentucky, and then in March 1865 to Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio. He was paroled at Camp Chase on 13 June 1865 after taking an oath of allegiance to the United States.

According to information in William’s 1865 military service record he had blue eyes, dark hair, fair complexion, and was 5 feet, 9 and 3/4 inches tall. When he was paroled on 13 June 1865 his age was listed as 35.

William died at the age of 52 in July 1882. His widow, Annie R. Castleberry, filed Civil War pension applications in September 1900, 15 August 1912, 9 August 1916, and finally on 3 June 1923.

Winchester D. Castleberry enlisted at Iuka, Mississippi, on 6 Apr 1861 when he was 23 years old as a private in Captain J. M. Stone’s Company K (Iuka Rifles), 2nd Regiment, Mississippi Volunteers, Mott's Brigade. NOTE: Mott’s name is in Winchester’s service record but it does not appear in the Compendium of the Confederate Armies for Mississippi.5 The 2nd Regiment’s original commander was Colonel William C. Falkner. Later Colonel John M. Stone became the regimental commander and was in command at the end of the war.

The 2nd was organized in Corinth, Mississippi, on 3 May 1861 and reorganized on 16 April 1862.6 It surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on 9 April 1865. It was involved in most of the major battles in and near northern Virginia including 1st Bull Run (21 July 1861), 2nd Bull Run (28 - 30 Aug 1862), Antietam (17 Sept 1862), Gettysburg 1 -3 July 1863), The Wilderness (5 - 6 May 1864), Cold Harbor (1 - 3 June 1864), the Petersburg Siege (June 1864 - April 1865), and finally Appomattox Court House (9 April 1865).7 The 2nd was initially a part of Bee’s Brigade, then Bee’s-Whiting’s Brigade (2nd Corps), then Whiting’s Brigade (2nd Corps), and later Whiting’s-Law’s Brigade (1st Corps), and finally Davis’ Brigade (3rd Corps).8 Winchester was wounded (and died two weeks later) on 1 October 1864 near Petersburg, Virginia. During that time period the 2nd Mississippi Regiment was a part of Davis’ Brigade, Heth’s Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.9

Winchester was enlisted in Iuka, Mississippi, by W. M. Inge for 12 months on 6 April 1861. By 10 May 1861 he was at Lynchburg, Virginia. The Regiment traveled by train from Corinth, Mississippi, to Lynchburg, Virginia, according to John Buchanan’s Diary10 and from there by train to Strasbury, Virginia, via Charlottesville and Manassas. They then marched 18 miles to Winchester, Virginia, and boarded a train to Harpers Ferry. Harpers Ferry was soon abandoned and by 4 July 1861 the 2nd Mississippi, which was now a part of General Benard Bee’s 3rd Brigade, was in Darksville, Virginia, awaiting an attack by General Patterson of the Union Army which never came about.11 Buchanan’s Diary (page 5) goes on to say that "an Inspector General’s report stated that the 2nd was badly clothed and very careless in its appointments. The officers are entirely without military knowledge of any description, and the men have a slovenly and unsolder-like appearance".

Later that year Winchester was issued one pair of shoes that cost him $2.80. He was appointed a 2nd sergeant on 1 Feb 1862 and a 1st sergeant on 11 June 1862. According to the muster roll for Jun/Jul and for Sept/Oct 1862 he was absent because he was wounded. He was admitted to the Culpepper, Virginia, Confederate Hospital on 29 Sept 1862 complaining of V. Sclopeticum (? Latin for gunshot wound, maybe), apparently a back problem or wound to the back. He was present for roll call on Nov/Dec 1862. The records show that by Mar/Apr 1863 he has been promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and was still in company K. The captain of the company was H. C. Terry. On the May/Jun 1863 muster roll his company is given as company E. His regimental commander was Colonel John M. Stone from Tishomingo County who was later governor of Mississippi and president of Mississippi State University. Winchester was most likely in the battle of Gettysburg on July 3 since his regiment sustained major losses (about 80 percent killed, wounded and captured according to Michael Brasher’s not yet published history of the 2nd Mississippi Regiment). On 3 November 1863 2nd Lt. Castleberry was ordered to go to Mississippi and round-up and arrest deserters and conscripts from the Confederate Army in the vicinity of Iuka, Mississippi. Apparently there was some confusion about the length of time this was to take since he was reported absent without cause in the fall and winter of 1863. To avoid discharge from the Army several letters were written justifying his long absence. One was written by Colonel John M. Stone on 30 April 1864 saying that 2nd Lt. Castleberry "returned as soon as ordered to do so and is a good officer and a gallant solder and his place cannot be supplied with as good a man". He does not appear on the muster role until Mar/Apr 1864 returning 23 Apr 1864 according to the records.

So, Winchester returned in late April 1864. A number of major battles involving his Regiment took place in the next several months in which he most likely participated. They were: The Wilderness ( May 5 - 6), Spotsylvania Court House (May 8 - 21), North Anna (May 23 - 26), Cold Harbor (June 1 - 3), Weldon Railroad (August 18 - 21), and the Petersburg Siege (June 1864 - April 1865).12

He obviously participated in the Petersburg Siege since the Sept/Oct 1864 muster roll reports that 2nd Lt. Winchester Castleberry died 14 October 1864 in General Hospital No. 4 in Richmond, Virginia, from wounds (Vuluus ? Sclopeticum -- Latin for gunshot wound) received 1 October in a battle near Petersburg, Virginia, after being admitted to the hospital on 2 October.13,14 I do not know where he is buried.

Charles C. Castleberry enlisted "about May 1862" according to his Civil War pension application which he filed on 9 Sept 1907 when he was 64 years old and living in Iuka, Mississippi. He also states in his application that his company commander was Captain John F. Doan and that he was in Philip Dale Roddey’s 4th Alabama Cavalry, Company I. Charles’ rank is given as sergeant in his 1863 military service record.

Philip Dale Roddey was from Moulton, Alabama. His regiment was officially organized at Tuscumbia, Alabama, in October 1862. The regiment spent the winter of 1862 in middle Tennessee. In the spring of 1863 it moved to North Alabama where it took an active part in raiding and attacking the Union forces. It also took an active part in contesting Streight’s Raid and fought with General Forrest in the victory of Brice’s Crossroads and at Harrisburg (Tupelo), Mississippi. The 4th regiment also fought with General Forrest at Athens, Alabama, and at Pulaski, Tennessee.

Charles was captured by Federal forces and paroled on 26 Jan 1863 at Alton, Illinois, by the post commander, J. Hilderbrand, after taking an oath of allegiance to the Federal government and swearing not to take up arms again during the rebellion.

According to Charles’ military service record he enlisted (or reenlisted) in February 1863 in Company B of the Alabama 11th Cavalry (also called Burtwell’s 10th Regiment). The enlistment officer was the same Captain John F. Doan from Roddey’s 4th Alabama Cavalry. Charles was the 1st Sergeant of Company B.

The 11th Alabama Cavalry was part of Roddey’s command. Charles’ brothers William, Thomas, and probably Rufus, were also in Company B enlisting at about the same time. Also, his first cousins, J.J. Akers and Thomas Akers, and William R. Coleman and Daniel E. Coleman were members of Company B. In fact, J.J. Akers was the company commander!

In his pension application Charles states that he surrendered at Pond Springs, Alabama, (General Joe Wheeler’s home on U. S. Hwy 72 near Town Creek) at the end of the war.

Two confusing and contradictory accounts are that he served under Colonel W.A. Johnson and surrendered with General Forest at Gainesville, Alabama15 and an enumeration in 1908 that says that Charles C. Castleberry was in Company K of the 4th Mississippi Regiment.16

Charles died in 1909.

Thomas C. Castleberry was in Company A of Roddey’s 4th Cavalry Regiment. His service record does not give an enlistment date. It does say that he was captured by Captain Harrison on 15 Feb 1863 at Big Springs, Mississippi, (apparently in Tishomingo County) and shipped off to Gratiot Street Military Prison in St. Louis and, after only a few days, from there to the civil war prison in Alton, Illinois. In early April 1863 he was paroled and sent to City Point, Virginia, for exchange. He was soon back in the Confederate Army, reenlisting in July 1863, this time in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry Regiment. He began as a private but was later promoted. Thomas died around 1890.

James Castleberry, Jr. was in the 22 Mississippi Infantry.17 He was born in 1817 and died around 1895.

Rufus Castleberry was in the 11th Alabama Cavalry.18 Rufus was born in 1832 and died in 1906. He is buried in Iuka, Mississippi.

J. J. Akers (this is probably Jackson J. Akers although it could be his son John Jefferson Akers) enlisted in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry Regiment. Colonel John R. Burtwell from Lauderdale, Alabama, and Lt. Colonel John Doan from Mississippi were the regimental commanders. J. J. Akers enlisted on 1 February 1863 at Tishomingo, Mississippi, for a period of three years according to his service record. The 11th Alabama Cavalry spent a large amount of time during the war in North Alabama and for some engagements was a part of the cavalry corps commanded by the famous General Nathan Bedford Forrest. J.J. Akers was a 1st Lieutenant and by August 1864 was the commander of Company B according to a service record found in his brother’s (Thomas Akers) file. Other family members in this company at one time or another were: Thomas Akers, William Castleberry (my great-grandfather), Charles C. Castleberry, Thomas C. Castleberry, and probably Rufus Castleberry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 17 - Ancestors of Elizabeth Carroll

"Trust your hunches . . . Hunches are usually based on facts filed away just below the conscious level."----- Dr. Joyce Brothers

 

Around 1816 in Jackson County, Georgia, Elizabeth Carroll married James Castleberry. The following Carroll’s are her paternal ancestors starting with her most distant American ancestor (John Carroll – born 1699, died 1784) and ending with her father (James Carroll – born 1768, died 1813). Elizabeth Carroll was my gg-grandmother.

The Carroll’s were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians who left Scotland around 1690 and settled in Northern Ireland (Ulster). From there in 1732 they emigrated to America (probably to Chester County, Pennsylvania). Around 1755 some of them moved south from Pennsylvania to York District, South Carolina. Still later they migrated (around 1800) to Jackson County, Georgia, and finally in 1840 one of them (Elizabeth Carroll) moved with her family (James Castleberry was her husband) to Tishomingo County, Mississippi, where she died in 1879. Elizabeth Carroll is buried beside her husband in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery near Iuka, Mississippi, in Tishomingo County.

Most of the following material has been taken from the Carroll family research of Dr. Henry B. Brackin, Jr. of Nashville, Tennessee.1 I have adopted the identification scheme used by Dr. Brackin. For example on the following page, for John Carroll, (23-1) is his identification number in the material researched and written by Dr. Brackin.

Chapter 18 - John Carroll (1664 – 1735)

The Carroll’s were Presbyterians and Scotch-Irish. Like many other Scotch-Irish they left Ulster (northern Ireland) during the eighteenth century mainly for economic reasons (repressive trade laws imposed on them by the English and unfair and large increases in the land rents). Political and religious considerations also played a part.1 Bad crops caused much famine leading to even more emigrants leaving for America (mostly to Pennsylvania) during the eighteenth century.

John Carroll (23-1) was born in Scotland (probably) and he fought in 1689 at the Battle of River Boyne for William of Orange against King James II. He received three square miles of land in America for his service. This land he passed to Joseph, the eldest of his three sons. John probably came to America (Chester County, Pennsylvania) in 1732 where he died not long afterwards. His sons were: Joseph, Samuel, and James. Thomas was maybe another son. Thomas Carroll had a deed recorded in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1733.2

Chapter 19 - Joseph Carroll (1699 – 1784)

"You have to live the life you were born to live"-----Mother Superior to Julie Andrews in the movie, "The Sound of Music," 1965

 

 

Joseph Carroll (23-2)1 was the son of John Carroll (23-1) above. Joseph2 was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1699 and died in York District, South Carolina, in 1784 (between January and March). He married Jennet (or Jane) Swance probably in Ireland in ??????. She was born in ?????? and died before May 1796. Joseph was the eldest son (of John Carroll) according to Thomas M. Carroll in his 1879 book, The History of the Carroll Family.

Joseph Carroll came to America in 1728 and settled in Chester County, Pennsylvania. In 1748, 1753, and 1754 he was in West Nantmeal Township of Chester County, Pennsylvania (West Nantmeal Township is in the northwest corner of Chester County and near the intersection of Chester, Berks, and Lancaster counties). By 1755 he had moved to Carolina according to the records of the Brandywine Manor Presbyterian Church in Chester County.3

According to Thomas M. Carroll’s book, in 1751 Joseph took the land grant in York District, South Carolina, given to his father John by the King of England for military services rendered by John Carroll.

In 1753 Gov. Glenn of South Carolina obtained land in the Catawba River Valley through a treaty with the Indians. Even so, much of the land in York County, South Carolina was still Indian land.

Brackin says that Joseph Carroll and his family were among the earliest Scotch-Irish settlers to arrive in the York District, South Carolina (they were probably there by 1755). They came seeking fertile soil and religious freedom. From Pennsylvania they traveled down the "Great Road", which followed the Shenandoah Valley, crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains through a gap at Roanoke, Virginia, then traveled south to Salisbury, North Carolina, where they followed the ancient "Catawba Trading Path" to the "Garden of the Waxhaws" as the Catawba River Valley was called. By 1757 more than 300 people lived on Rocky and Fishing Creeks. Those in the first wave used packhorses, not wagons. They would leave in the fall after the crops were gathered and travel south during the winter (it took about 20 weeks) arriving in the spring in time to plant a new crop in fresh soil.

John H. Logan4 in his history of the upper South Carolina country has this to say about the Carroll family:---

The Carrolls settled first on Allison’s Creek. There were three brothers who took a part in the Revolution ,--Thomas, John and Joseph. Old Joseph Carroll was the father. They came from Pennsylvania. John and Thomas C. afterwards lived near Ebenezer. There were three families connected who came the same time form Pennsylvania, and settled on Fishing and Allison’s Creek, York Dist.,--they were the Hatchfords [probably Ratchfords], Carrolls and Hendersons. They were all true Whigs, and staunch Presbyterians; it is said that these families contributed 16 strong men to the cause of Liberty, all of whom saw active service, and came off without a scratch, except John Hatchford, who was shot at Hanging Rock. He was however, fortunate enough to recover.5

So far no records have been found for the land passed to Joseph Carroll by his father, John (the land in America granted to John Carroll for services rendered to the King of England). In 1754 Joseph purchased 354 acres of land from Samuel Young in the County of Anson, North Carolina, on the south side or the Catawba River and on the north side of Crowder Creek below John Little’s survey. Also, in 1755 Joseph purchased 478 acres from James Armstrong and Samuel Young on the Little Catawba Creek. These are probably the tracks that were willed to Joseph’s son Thomas in the first will of 1777. Today this land is probably in Gaston County, North Carolina. Later Joseph bought 600 acres of land on Allison Creek of the Catawba River (1763 deed in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina) and 354 acres on Crowder Creek (1763 deed in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina). In his first will in 1777 Joseph was living on Allison Creek, probably near present day Bethany, South Carolina, in York County. In his second will in 1784 Joseph was living in the Camden District of York County.

The children of Joseph and Jennet Carroll were:

Mary (23-5) who was born ca 1728 and died ????. She married William Ratchford (ca 1724 – 13 November 1804) before 1753, apparently in Chester County, Pennsylvania.

Elizabeth (23-7) was born ca 1732 and died before 1784. She married Nathaniel Henderson (ca 1729 – 20 February 1794).

John (H?) (23-6) was born ca 1732 and died before 1784. He married Mary Kuykendall. More about John (H?) in Chapter 20.

Thomas (23-8) was born in 1736 in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1829 in York County, South Carolina. He married Esther Armstrong. He along with his brothers, John, Joseph, and Samuel, were in the Revolutionary War.

Jane (23-9) was born around 1740 and died in 1832. She married John M. Gallagher.

Ann (23-10) was born around 1743 and died ????. She married James Alexander.

Joseph (23-11) was born in 1746 and died in 1803. He married Martha Swansey (1752 - 1849). He was a quartermaster sergeant in the Revolutionary War.

Samuel (23-12) was born around 1748 and died in 1783. He married Margaret Leslie. Samuel was a Revolutionary War soldier.

Hannah (23-13) was born around 1750 and died in 1801. She married Richard Venable.

Chapter 20 - John (H?) Carroll (ca 1732 – ca 1781)

"When you say a situation or a person is hopeless, you are slamming the door in the face of God"---- Charles L. Allen

 

John (H?) Carroll (23-6) was the son of Joseph Carroll (23-2) above. John was born around 1732 and died before 1784.1 In 1753 he was listed in the tax records of West Nantmeal Township in Chester County, Pennsylvania, as a freeman (unmarried and over 21).2

John Carroll married Mary Kuykendall in 1767 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of James Kuykendall and Sarah Coburn. John and Mary Carroll lived on Fishing Creek (between the Main Fork and Stoney Fork) which is now in York County, South Carolina, but was in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 1767. Some of the land on Fishing Creek John’s wife, Mary, inherited from her father, James Kuykendall, when he died around 1765.

In 1769 John became the guardian of his orphaned brother-in-law, Jonathan Kuykendall. In the July 1769 Tyron County, North Carolina Court of Pleas papers John is referred to as John Jr. (an uncle was probably John Sr.).

John was in the Revolutionary War and fought bravely throughout the War---according to one report: he was in a variety of engagements and always acquitted himself as a brave and daring soldier. His most epic achievement seems to have been the slaying of the monster Huck on 12 July 1780.

The monster Huck was Captain Christian Huck, formerly a prominent lawyer in Philadelphia and during the Revolutionary War a British loyalist (Tory) fighting for the Crown. He had an intense hatred for the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians (like the Carroll’s) and in the South Carolina backcountry he found a great opportunity for carrying out his kind of war. The brief battle that resulted in Captain Huck’s death and defeat occurred on 12 July 1780 in York County, South Carolina.3

Draper4 says this about the defeat of Captain Huck:

John H. Logan says in his book5 that -- John Carroll killed Huck from a clump of plum trees.

Draper6 says: John Carroll was the one who killed Capt. Huck, who had mounted his horse, close at hand, while the other British Tories’ horses were hitched some little distance off. Carroll said, "If you find two rifle balls passed into his face close together, then I killed him, for I loaded with two balls." Two such ball holes were found in subsequent years. Dr. Simpson took up Huck’s skeleton and preserved it and there were two ball holes in it and the skeleton was taken first to Alabama and then subsequently to California.

Huck’s defeat, where about 500 Whigs defeated 150 British soldiers and Tories on 12 July 1780, led to a turn around in the fortunes of the Americans in this part of South Carolina (the up-country or back-country as it was then called). Charleston had fallen to the British earlier in May 1780. The victory against Huck and his forces boosted American morale and led to successful engagements for them at other near-by places like Hanging Rock, King’s Mountain, Cowpens, and Eutaw Springs.7

Draper says:

John Carroll shot Capt Huck and near the close of the [Rev] War went into a cabin to light his pipe, when a concealed Tory within shot and killed him as he entered the cabin–left wife and three children who early went to Georgia. A grandson John Carroll, was not long since residing 3 miles from Village Springs, Blount County, Alabama (about 20 miles northeast of downtown Birmingham on Hwy 75 and on the county line between Jefferson and Blount Counties).

Many land deeds involving the relatives and heirs of John Carroll were written between 1793 and 1825 in York County, South Carolina. Most of these transactions involved land on Fishing Creek. One tract in 1793 was described as the South side of the North Fork of Fishing Creek and another in 1800 says land was on South side of the Main Branch of Fishing Creek.

John Carroll’s widow, Mary (Kuykenhall) Carroll, moved to Jackson County, Georgia, probably around 1806 where she died in 1808 (according to internet sources).

John Carroll and Mary Kuykenhall had the following children:

1. James Carroll (23-14) (1768 - 1813). More about him in Chapter 21.

2. Jane Carroll (23-16) (ca 1770 - ????)

3. Thomas Carroll (23-17) (ca 1775 - 1840). Thomas seems to be in the 1790 and 1800 census living with his mother, Mary Kuykenhall Carroll. The Thomas Carroll in the 1820 census for Gwinnett County, Georgia, is probably this Thomas. Also listed on the same page are William Nesbit (Chapter 23), the stepson of James Carroll (23-17), and Thomas Castleberry (probably the father of James Castleberry who married Elizabeth Carroll around 1816). James Castleberry was also listed in the 1820 Gwinnett County census.

Thomas married Delila (or Dilla Y.) probably after 1800. She died before him.

In 1809 Thomas (along with brother, James) is on a tax list in Wilkinson County, Georgia, and in 1820 he was probably the Thomas Carroll in the Gwinnett County, Georgia, census. In 1824 he was on the Fayette County, Georgia, tax list with a total of 1950.5 acres of Georgia land located in Fayette, Coweta, Wilkinson, and DeKalb Counties. He was still on the Fayette County tax list in 1825, 1830 and 1840. And in 1840 he left a will in Fayette County, Georgia.

According to Thomas Carroll’s will (11 November 1840) their ten children were: Polly, Sally, John, Malinda, James, Thomas, Elizabeth, Marcus Lafayette, Francis Marion, and Emily Jane.

For more info see: http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=327485088

Chapter 21 – James Carroll (1768 - 1813)

"Why should you be content with so little? Why shouldn't you reach out for something big?"--- Charles L. Allen

James Carroll (23-14), the father of Elizabeth Carroll (23-20), was born in York District, South Carolina, around 1768 and he died in Jackson County, Georgia, in 1813 (his will was written 9 March 1813 and probated on 6 July 1813). I do not know where he is buried. He married Sarah Miller Nesbit in 1795(?). She was the widow of Joseph Nesbit who died around 1789.

James Carroll was still in York District, South Carolina in 1793 and in 1800. However, by October 1802 he had moved to Jackson County, Georgia. His mother, Mary Kuykendall, apparently moved to Jackson County around 1806 since in 1808 James was given power of attorney status to carry out some business for her in York County, South Carolina (she sold 77 acres on Fishing Creek to her brother, Samuel Kuykendall, in 1806). In 1808 both James and his mother (if indeed this Mary is his mother) were residing in Jackson County. According to his will he owned land in Wilkerson County, Georgia, (with Thomas Carroll), and in York County, South Carolina, but strangely enough none in Jackson County, Georgia.1 According to his will James Carroll had five children (names not given – other sources relied on) living in 1813:

1. Daughter (23-18) maybe born ca 1796 and died before 1813. According to the 1800 census James had three daughters, this "unknown" daughter, Mary, and Elizabeth. Rachel MAY not have been included since she may have been born after the 1800 census. If Rachel was born before the 1800 census then this first daughter goes away.

2. Mary (Polly) (23-19) was born ca 1797 and died in 1860. She is buried in the Nancy Creek Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery beside her mother Sarah Miller Carroll. She married John Blake (brother of Rhoda Blake who married Thomas Carroll) in ????. John Blake was born 1 January 1798 and died 14 June 1854. He also is buried in the Nancy Creek Cemetery. In John Blake’s 1854 will he left part of his estate (after the death of his wife) to James Castleberry, his brother-in-law, who was residing in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. He also mentions numerous other relatives.

3. Elizabeth (23-20) was born in 1800 and died in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, in 1879. She married James Castleberry around 1816 and moved to Mississippi in 1840. More about her in Chapter 20.

4. Rachel (23-21) was born ca 1800 in South Carolina and died 27 Aug 1832 in Fayette County, Georgia. She was married in Gwinnett County, Georgia, on 24 Nov 1822 to John Dennis Stell. He was an Inferior Court Justice in Fayette County, a State Senator, President of the State Senate, Delegate to the First and Second Southern Conventions and served in the 53rd Regiment of the Georgia Militia in the Mexican War. He later moved to Tyler, Texas.

5. John (23-22) was born 3 Sept 1803 in South Carolina and died on 10 Feb 1876 in ??????. He married Elizabeth Maloney in 1823. She was born 25 Oct 1808 and died 31 May 1858. He appears as executor of the estate of his uncle Thomas Carroll and of his brother-in-law John Blake. He bought property in Fayette County, Georgia, on 8 Jan 1824 next to Thomas Carroll that he later sold to Thomas Carroll on 2 Dec 1832. He apparently remained in Gwinnett County, Georgia.

6. Thomas (23-23) was born around 1805 in Georgia and died 3 Oct 1849 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. He married Rhoda Blake in ?????. She was born around 1809 and died in 1879 (same year as her sister-in-law, Elizabeth Carroll Castleberry).

Chapter 22 - Elizabeth Carroll (1801 - 1879)

 

"He who feels no pride in his ancestors is unworthy to be remembered by his descendents,"----Major David F. Boyd, CSA

 

Elizabeth Carroll married James Castleberry around 1816 in Jackson County, Georgia. She was born in 1801 in York District, South Carolina, and died July 1879 in Tishomingo County, Mississippi. Her mother was Sarah Miller of Charleston, South Carolina, and her father was James Carroll (1768 – 1813) of York District, South Carolina.

Sarah, whose father was Andrew Miller, first married Joshua Nesbit who came to America in 1780 from County Town, Ireland, and settled in York District, South Carolina. They had one son, William Nesbit (Chapter 23). Joshua lived only a short time after arriving in South Carolina.

After his death Sarah Miller Nesbit married James Carroll, also from York District, South Carolina. Sarah Carroll died 6 April 1843 and is buried beside her daughter, Polly Carroll Blake, in an unmarked grave in the cemetery of the Nancy Creek Primitive Baptist Church in Chamblee, Georgia.1

In 1878 Elizabeth Carroll Castleberry filled a claim with the Federal government to recover losses that she incurred during the Civil War.2 The claim for $8688.00 was for the loss of horses, mules, sheep, houses, produce, and provisions. The Claims Commission disallowed her claim.

Elizabeth Carroll died in July 1879 and is buried beside her husband in Mt. Evergreen Cemetery near Iuka in Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

 

Chapter 23 - William Nesbit (1788 - 1863)

(Half-brother of Elizabeth Carroll)

William Nesbit (20 Oct. 1788 - 27 June 1863) was the half-brother of Elizabeth Carroll. He moved to the Hog Mountain Community in Jackson County, Georgia, (now Gwinnett County) as a young man from York District, South Carolina.1 He married Mary Lollis of Virginia (27 Nov. 1789 - 3 Jan 1849). In 1813 he assisted in constructing a road from Hog Mountain to Fort Gilmer at the Standing Peachtree thirty miles west of Hog Mountain. It was called the Peachtree Road and eventually, after being extended to Marthasville (Atlanta), became the famous Peachtree Street.2 In December 1818, when Gwinnett County was created, partly out of Jackson County, his home was made a part of the new county. He was a Justice of the Peace and the second (some say the first) sheriff of Gwinnett County serving off-and-on from 1820 to 1830. His farm was near the Gwinnett-DeKalb county line on the Lawrenceville-Atlanta highway (Hwy 29). He, his wife, and several members of his family are buried in the family graveyard which is located in Lilburn, Georgia, at the southwest corner of the intersection of Hwy 29 and Jimmy Carter Blvd.

An extremely glowing account of William Nesbit is given in James C. Flanagan’ s book3 and is reproduced below:

 

William Nesbit was the first sheriff [some sources say the second] of Gwinnett County and held the office consecutively as sheriff and deputy sheriff for fourteen years. It has been said, and it was universally conceded by the old citizens, that he was the most efficient sheriff the county ever had. As an arresting officer especially, he has had no equal with my knowledge so far as this county is concerned.

In his day as sheriff, the county was new, the population to a great extent wild and lawless, and it had within its limits many desperadoes as is common in all new countries. It was once said by William Brogdon that North and South Carolina had boiled over and the scum had run over into the new part of Georgia. Many of these desperate men had at various times resisted successfully the constables, but when Nesbit got after them, if they could not outrun him, they were sure to be taken.

I still remember his clear shrill voice in calling parties and witnesses into court. That clarion voice is still upon my ear as he would open court with with his "Oyes! Oyes! Oyes! The Superior Court of Gwinnett County is now opened according to adjournment. God save the state and the honorable court." It was said with as much grace and dignity as it is said in England by one of the high sheriffs of the realm.

Those were my Robin Hood days, the days of the log cabin and the sanded floor, of pewter plates and basins displayed in the sun and to passers-by on a shelf at the front door and to visitors in the cupboard in the principal room in the house; of tinkers with packs on their backs to mend such wares as might be broken, or to mould new ones from the old for the thrifty housewives. Those were the days when the land was fresh from the hand of God. No sedge or old pine fields; and the country was covered with magnificent forests, and the streams were full of fish. If a young man wished to marry, he went on the other side of the spring, or to the other side of his father’s virgin soil, built his log cabin, cleared a turnip patch and cow pen, married and went to multiplying and replenishing the earth according to law. Since then, alas! The country is scarred with red gullies and old worn out fields, the forests are gone , and if a young man marries, there is little assurance but that he will become a profligate and a debaucher, and procuring an emigrant ticket, elope with another woman to the distant West, leaving his wife in wretchedness and his children in want.

Mr. Nesbit served two sessions in the state senate, first in 1829 and again in 1833. He was born in York District, South Carolina, and in early life came to Jackson County and afterwards moved to this county and died June 27, 1863, at the age of 76. He lived for many years near the DeKalb County line on the Hightower trail, the dividing line between the counties of Gwinnett and DeKalb. He was a man of striking appearance, full six feet high, of well-rounded proportions, evincing strength and activity, a remarkable walk indicating independence and resolution. His face was of the finest type, bespeaking manliness but kindness and benevolence.

Upon a recent visit by the writer to his son, Hon. John Nesbit, of Milton County, he showed me a photograph of his father. It was a perfect facsimile of William Nesbit, with his peculiar form, handsome face and determined contour of the mouth that had so often excited my admiration of the original when in life.

It was in his domestic life that the nobler and kinder traits of the man were displayed. When his married daughter would reach that point in married life, woman’s greatest extremity, when all the affections of the father are drawn out and his keenest solicitude aroused for the safe passage through the dreaded ordeal, he would be there at her bedside to administer comfort and assurance; and amid all his noble traits of character, this was the noblest and kindest, the best of them all.

Of all the men of whom I have or may write, the subject of this sketch has claims upon me hardly equaled by any. He was for a long series of years the fast friend and companion of my father and the devoted friend of his family, agreeing in all their views, especially in politics in which they were in harmony through a long life with uninterrupted friendship and cordiality. Being of the first settlers of the new county, they went, shoulder to shoulder, in efforts to suppress crime and rascality, thereby contracting an intimacy that terminated only with their lives.

I would that I was competent to pronounce a suitable eulogy of his private life and public services. I feel my inability for the task.

He, with his associates and compeers of early times and history "wrapped the drapery of their couch about them and laid down to pleasant dreams." It is left to me, in a feeble way, to call-up their memories. This task is agreeable but the service is lame.

"I name them over one by one And weep o’er days forever gone

O’er friends whose suns of life have set And voices thrilling memory yet.

"They vanished like a morning beam Of sunlight on the rippling stream;

And gloom lurks in the web of years And hope of youth all disappears.

"Now when the moon her chariot drives And night, the jeweled maid,

arrives, I think upon departed hours With hush of moon and blush of flowers."

Chapter 24 - Introduction -- Daniel Thomas Coleman

"Hain’t we got all the fools in town on our side? And hain’t that a big enough majority in any town"---------Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn

 

 

 

Annie Rosa Coleman (1840 – ca 1925) married my g-grandfather William Castleberry (1835 – 1882) in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, on 27 January 1862. Her father was Daniel Thomas Coleman (1800 – 1873). William Castleberry was the son of James Castleberry (1793 – 1859) and Elizabeth Carroll (1801 – 1879).

The ancestors of Daniel Thomas Coleman moved from Brunswick County, Virginia to Halifax County, North Carolina (around 1766) and from there (around 1790) to Greene County, Georgia. Daniel’s father was Eden Coleman (1764 – 1816) and his mother was Nancy Ann Daniel (ca 1772 – 1828). Both are buried in Greene County, Georgia.

Eden’s parents were Daniel Coleman (1720 – 1777) and Unity Carroll (1720 – 1800). Nancy Ann’s father was Thomas Daniel (ca 1740 – 1813) and her mother was Sarah Burney (? – 1815).

Eden Coleman was born in Virginia in February 1864 and he died in 1816 in Greene County, Georgia. His wife (Nancy Ann Daniel) was born ca 1772 and she died in 1828 in Greene County, Georgia.

Daniel Thomas Coleman’s wife was Clarinda Ann R. Randle (ca 1804 – ca 1885). Her father was William Randle (ca 1778 – 1830) who was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, and her mother was Susan Robinson Rives (ca 1783 - ??) who was born in Maryland. They are both buried in Morgan County, Georgia.

Intermarriages between the Coleman, Daniel, and Randle families took place before their move to Georgia ca 1790. For example Daniel Coleman and his wife (Clarinda Ann Randle) were reputed to be cousins. Also, the first wife of Thomas Daniel (mentioned above) was Sarah Randle.

Chapter 25 - Daniel Coleman

(1720 - 1777)

This Daniel Coleman was the father of Eden Coleman and the grandfather of Daniel T. Coleman. He was born in Virginia ca 1720 [1] and he married Unity Carrell (or Carroll) (1720 – 1800) probably around 1740. Unity’s father was John Carrell and her mother was Unity Fox. Nothing is know about the parents of this "older" Daniel Coleman.

I do not know where Daniel Coleman was born (maybe in Brunswick County, Virginia). I assume that he was born around 1720 and married Unity Carrell around 1740 since his eldest child (Daniel Coleman, Jr.) was born in 1741.

From land records and internet sources some information can be gained about Daniel Coleman’s life. The first record I have found for him is a 1755 deed [2] in Brunswick County in southern Virginia near the North Carolina border. In this 1755 deed he bought 350 acres of land from his father-in-law, John Carrell of Northampton County, North Carolina who was deceased by 1766 [3]. A witness to this 1755 deed was John Coleman. What kin was he?

By 1755 Daniel had been married for about fifteen years and he was approximately 35 years old. Since no earlier Brunswick County records have been found for him I am led to believe that perhaps he resided elsewhere before 1755. Five years later in 1760 he bought 40 acres from Andrew Beck [4] near the earlier land purchase. Andrew Beck’s will was written in 1760 [5] and he was deceased by 1761.

In 1766 Daniel Coleman sold his Brunswick County land (located on the west side of Lizard Creek) and moved to nearby Halafax County in North Carolina [6]. The total amount of Brunswick County land involved was 400 acres and 150 acres of this he gave to his eldest son, Daniel Coleman, Jr.

In Halifax County Daniel Coleman bought 800 acres of land on 25 September 1766. This property was on Great Creek at the mouth of Watery Branch, according to several deeds [7].

In a short time Daniel and Unity Coleman were on the move again. In 1768 and 1769 they sold their Halifax County land and moved to adjacent Bute (now Warren) County, North Carolina. There he bought 640 acres located on both sides of Ready Branch and there he lived until his death at age 57 in 1777.

The final record for Daniel Coleman was his will [8] which was written on 17 July 1777 and recorded later that year after he died. From his will it can be seen that at his death Daniel Coleman was a plantation owner with 14 slaves and land (in addition to his plantation) on the east and west side of Ready Branch in Warren County, North Carolina. In addition to his widow, Unity Carrell Coleman, he left twelve mostly young children. They ranged in age from 36 years old (Daniel, Jr.) to less than a year old (Davis). Among the twelve children only five were of lawful age (Mary Ann was one of the five and she was 18 years old and unmarried). Two of his daughters were married (Sarah and Frances) and probably so were his two oldest sons (Daniel, Jr. and James). His will does not mention any grandchildren.

Unity died in 1800. Probably she and her husband are buried in Warren County, North Carolina---but I know not where.

The children of Daniel and Unity Coleman according to his will and borrowing from internet source (Ancestry.com) are given below.

 

Eden Coleman (father of Daniel T. Coleman) was born February 1764 in Virginia (probably in Brunswick County since that is where land records indicate his parents lived at that time).1 His parents were Daniel Coleman (1720 – 1777) and Unity Carroll (or Carrell) (1720 – 1800).

Eden was only thirteen years old in 1777 when his father died in Warren County, North Carolina. Previous to that time he had moved in 1766 with his parents from Brunswick County, Virginia to Halifax County, North Carolina and then in 1769 to Warren County, North Carolina.

Based on the 1793 birth of his daughter, Sally Coleman (assuming she was the first child), Eden probably married Nancy Ann Daniel (ca 1772 – 1828) around 1792. Her father was Thomas Daniel (ca 1740 – 1813) and her mother was Sarah Burney (? – 1815).

It appears that Eden Coleman arrived in Greene County, Georgia, around 1790 (perhaps later if his daughter Sally was born in 1793 in Maryland as some sources indicate). Greene County, Georgia was established from the northern part of Washington County in 1786. It was named for the Revolutionary War hero, General Nathaniel Greene. The county seat is Greensboro.

When he arrived he was about twenty-five years old. His father-in-law (Thomas Daniel) was selling land in Greene County as early as 1792.2 My speculation is that the Coleman’s, Daniel’s, and Randle’s arrived in Greene County together around 1790 and settled on the waters of Richland Creek. Judging from the given names of some family members it appears that intermarriages between these three families began before their arrival in Georgia.

Eden was buying land in Greene County, Georgia, as early as 1790.3 In 1795 he was a witness for land sold by Samuel Thorton.4 Another land transaction in Greene County occurred seventeen years later in 1812 when he bought an alley (located fifty feet north of Broad Street) in the town of Greensboro5 (the county seat). In 1815, one year before he died (at age 52), he bought land on the waters of Richland Creek6 in Greene County. In 1821 (Eden died in 1816) Eden’s wife (Nancy) sold 574 acres to James G. Randle, her son-in-law (husband of Sally, the eldest child).7 This land was on Richland Creek.

Eden Coleman was a Justice of the Peace in Greene County, Georgia, at some point in time between 1813 – 1816.

Eden Coleman’s will8 is dated 10 September 1816. In his will he appoints his wife (Nancy) the sole executor of his estate. In Nancy’s will9 (29 March 1825) she appoints her son (Daniel T. Coleman) and her son-in-law (Samuel Greene) executors of her estate. She also names Sally Randle, Cynthia Ralls, Eliza Greene, David Coleman, Daniel Coleman, and the heirs of Allen Coleman to receive a portion of her estate.

Eden died in 1816 and Nancy died in 1828 in Greene County where they are probably buried.

1. Sarah C. (Sally) was born about 1793 in Maryland and died 22 February 1845 in Penfield (Greene County) Georgia. She married John Graves Randle (ca 1790 – 1863) on 26 January 1808 in Greene County. Her husband was an uncle to the younger John Graves Randle (1810 – 1895) mentioned later on page 8. This younger John Graves was a brother to Clarinda Ann Randle who married Daniel T. Coleman on 7 January 1824.

2. Eliza was born about 1797. She first married Lemuel (or Samuel) Greene (he was later a Justice of the Peace) and after his death she married Landon Palmer.

3. David was mentioned in his mother’s will.

4. Daniel Thomas was born around 1800 probably in Greene County, Georgia. (more about him in Chapter 28) and he died in 1873 in Pontotoc, Mississippi. He married his cousin, Clarinda Ann Randle, in Greene County in 1824.

5. Allen. W. married Nancy Ward. He died before 1821.10

6. Cynthia married James Ralls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 27 - Thomas Coleman Daniel (ca 1740 – 1813)

Thomas Coleman Daniel was the father of Nancy Ann Daniel who married Eden Coleman around 1792. Thomas Daniel was born about 1740 in Virginia. His father was Captain William Daniel and his mother was Elizabeth Coleman (her relationship to Eden Coleman is unknown).

According to an Internet source1 Elizabeth Coleman’s linage was as follows: She was born in 1715 and her father was Robert Coleman III (1680 – 1748) who was born in New Kent County, Virginia and died in Caroline County, Virginia. Her mother was Mary Clayton (1683 - ?) who was born in Abingdon Parish, Essex County, Virginia. Robert Coleman III’s father was Robert Coleman II (1656 – 13 August 1713), and his father was Robert Coleman (ca 1620 – 1680) who was born in Suffolk County, England and died in Gloucester County, Virginia. So, Robert Coleman was the immigrant ancestor in this family probably arriving in America around 1645 (speculation). He married Elizabeth Grizzel about 1650 in Rappahannock, Essex, Virginia. Other direct ancestors were Robert’s father, John Coleman, who was born in Braxton, Mango, Essex, England and John’s father who was Sir James Coleman who married Mary Spencer. Both Sir James and Mary were born in England.

Thomas Coleman Daniel first married Sarah Randle and after she died he married Sarah Burney.2 Thomas Daniel was in the Revolutionary War.3 He had at least five older brothers (Samuel Coleman—the oldest—was born about 1728).

On 6 January 1787 Thomas Daniel was granted 460 acres of land in Greene County, Georgia.4 As early as 1792 he was selling and buying land in Greene County5. So he apparently arrived there around 1790. Based on deeds around 18006 his land was on Richland Creek. He also owned land in Madison County, Kentucky7 which he willed to his daughter, Nancy Coleman.

The children of Thomas Daniel and Sarah Burney were:

1. Nancy Ann (ca 1772 – 1828) married Eden Coleman around 1792. She died in 1828 in Greene County, Georgia.

2. Mary (?? - ??) No information on Mary.

3.Sarah (? – 1804) was sometimes called Sally. She married E. L. W. Fitzsimmons who died in 1799.8 In her 1804 will9 she directed that "her body be embalmed and a vault to be built 12 feet by 20 feet on my father’s burying ground. My coffin is to be made as neat as possible and lined with cambrick". Her will mentions her sisters (Nancy Coleman and Betsy Cooper), her niece (Sally Coleman), and her brother (William), but no children or husband. She left the residue of her estate to her mother including all her wearing apparel.

4.Elizabeth (? – 1809) was called Betsy. She married James Cooper. In her will10 (17 October 1809) she mentions her daughter (Sophia Martin), her late husband (James Cooper), her sister (Nancy Coleman) and her brother (William). She appointed her father (Thomas Daniel) and her friends (Elijah Cooper and James Randall) to be the executors of her estate.

5.William (? – before 1813) married Mary ??

6.Charles (?? - ??) No information on Charles.

Thomas and Sarah Daniel outlived their children (except Nancy Ann) so their heirs were mainly their grandchildren. Thomas Daniel died in 1813 (his will is dated 7 April 1813)11 and his wife Sarah died in 1815 (her will is dated 3 July 1815).12 In his will he mentioned the following grandchildren: Charles (land on Greenbrier Creek to him), Polly Daniel, Sally B. Daniel (she married a Lanford before 1815), Maria Daniel, Harriett Ann Daniel, and Nancy Coleman. Thomas made his wife (Sarah) the executrix of his estate.

Two years later when Sarah died her will named the following grandchildren: John K. Daniel, Polly Daniel, Sally B. Lanford (she was willed a "still" holding 180 gallons), Mariah Daniel, and Harriet Ann Daniel. She made her son-in-law (Eden Coleman) the executor of her estate.

Almost all of these grandchildren must have been children of William and Charles since their last name was Daniel. And, of course, the Nancy Coleman mentioned above was Eden’s wife (Nancy Ann).

 

 

 

Chapter 28 - William Randle

(ca 1778 – 1830)

William Randle (ca 1778 – 19 October 1830) was the father of Clarinda Ann R. Randle (wife of Daniel T. Coleman). William was born in Brunswick County, Virginia, and he died at age 52 in Morgan County, Georgia. He, and probably his wife, are buried in Morgan County, Georgia, in a cemetery at the intersection of Clack and Spears Roads (also known as the Old Oscar Fears place).1 This spot is about 4 miles south and west of the I-20 and Hwy 83 intersection. William’s father was James Randle (born about 1745 in Virginia) and his mother was Roseanna Graves (born about 1754 in Virginia). William Randle had seven brothers. One was James Graves Randle (ca 1790 – 1863) who married Sarah (Sallie) Coleman (see p. 3) on 26 January 1808 in Greene County, Georgia.

On 24 September 1802 William Randle married Susan Robinson Rives (ca 1783 – ca 1834) in Greensville County, Virginia. Soon afterwards they moved to Greene County, Georgia.

According to a Greene County deed William Randle and his wife Susan sold land in Greene County to George Irving on 4 November 1804.2 So, William obviously moved from Virginia to Greene County, Georgia, very soon after his 1802 marriage. His oldest child (Clarinda Ann R. who married Daniel T. Coleman in 1824) was born ca 1805, probably in Greene County.

By 1806 William was buying and selling land in Morgan County, Georgia, so he evidently moved there around that time. In 1808 he bought land in Morgan County on Indian Creek from Abraham Heard. Deed records show that other land transactions took place up until the time of William Randle’s death in 1830. I do not know the exact location of his land. The deeds say that some of it was on Indian Creek, some on Little River, some at Heard’s Fork of Indian Creek, some was near a road leading from Durden’s bridge to Madison, Georgia. I believe that some of his land was near the spot where William Randle and his wife (Susan R. Randle) are buried. As already mentioned this spot is in Morgan County, Georgia, in a cemetery at the intersection of Clack and Spears Roads (also known as the Old Oscar Fears place). It is about 4 miles south and west of the I-20 and Hwy 83 intersection.

According to the Morgan County Federal census for 1830 William Randle was the owner of 42 slaves.

William Randle died at age 52 on 19 October 1830 and was buried on his land in Morgan County. His will3 is dated 2 October 1830. In it he leaves his property to his unmarried children. They were Mary and Lavenia and his seven sons (James G., William, Willis, Thomas, Irvin, Lackington, and Walton H.). Therefore his married children in 1830 were Clarinda Ann (married to Daniel T. Coleman), Lucy J., Elizabeth Rebecca, and Susan. He wishes for his wife to be provided for and his land to be equally divided between his seven sons (son William also got his father’s gold watch).

Others got personal property (Negroes---according to the 1830 census he had 42 slaves, furniture, etc). When William Randle died in 1830 he had thirteen children (assuming all were still living). Nine were minors (one minor was Susan who was married). So, it is no surprise that on 2 May 1831 the Morgan County, Georgia, court appointed the son-in-law, Daniel T. Coleman, administrator of William Randle’s estate.

William’s wife, Susan R. Randle, died between 6 February 1834 and 2 March 1835. She was listed as deceased in a Morgan County deed on 2 March 1835.4

William and Susan Randle had the following children:

1. Clarinda Ann R. (ca1805 - ca 1885) was probably born in Greene County, Georgia, and she died in Pontotoc, Mississippi. She married Daniel T. Coleman (more about him in Chapter 28) in Greene County, Georgia, on 7 January 1824.

2. Lucy J. (ca 1806 - ?) was born probably in Morgan County, Georgia.

3. Elizabeth Rebecca (25 December 1807, - ?) was born probably in Morgan County, Georgia.

4. William (Buck) was born 25 December 1807, probably in Morgan County, Georgia.

5. James Graves (ca 1810 – October 1895) was born in Morgan County, Georgia, and he died in Aberdeen, Mississippi. He was named after his uncle (father’s brother, John Graves Randle, mentioned earlier on page 61) who married Sally Coleman in 1808 in Greene County, Georgia. This younger John Graves married Emily F. Hearn in Morgan County, Georgia, on 1 December 1831 (Rev. Thomas J. Hand).

Several 1833 Morgan County deeds show that he was an active land trader. His land appears to be in the same general vicinity as his father’s land (on Indian Creek and Little River). Two 1833 deeds list him as being "of" Putnam County, Georgia (adjacent to Morgan County).5 His last Morgan County transaction was [maybe] in 1836 when he sold 465 acres to William Moncrief.6 In this deed a 20 foot square is reserved for the BURYING ground which will be kept by the family unsold.

By 1840 he had moved to Aberdeen, Mississippi (Monroe County). There he became quite wealthy. His home in Aberdeen was on South Chestnut Street. His 1800 acre plantation (near present day Muldon – about 7 miles southwest of Aberdeen, Mississippi, on state highway 25) was called "Cotton Gardens" and was a showplace of the county. He killed Judge Lee for "slandering the fame and virtue" of his wife. He was tried for murder in October 1850 but was found not guilty.7 On 21 December 1851 he sold his home in Aberdeen and moved to his plantation. In 1860 his estate was valued at $276,000 and he owned 160 slaves. Ten years later in 1870 the Federal census gave his estate value to be only $4000 and his occupation was listed as "clerk". The famous lawyer and writer from Aberdeen, Mississippi (Reuben Davis) mentioned him in his 1889 autobiography.8 He says—"James G. Randall also belongs to the early history of Aberdeen, though he still lives, in his vigorous old age, to take part in the present. He is a man of warm heart and kindly nature. If his temper is impetuous and his speech sometimes bitter, those who have known him longest and best can testify that beneath the bitter outside shell the kernel is sweet and sound."

 

 

The children of James Graves Randle and Emily F. Hearn were:

a) Willis (ca 1824 - ?) was born in Morgan County, Georgia. In the 1840 Federal

b) Susan (ca 1832 - ?) was probably born in Morgan County, Georgia.

c) Mary (ca 1835 - ?) was probably born in Morgan County, Georgia.

d) Thomas G. (ca 1839 - ?) was probably born in Monroe County, Mississippi

e) Irvin R. (ca 1841 - ?) was born probably in Monroe County, Mississippi

f) Lackington C. (ca 1843 - ?) was probably born in Monroe County, Mississippi

g) Walton H. (ca 1844 - ?) was born probably in Monroe County, Mississippi

h) Lavenia (ca 1849 - ?) was born probably in Monroe County, Mississippi

 

 

 

Chapter 29 - Daniel T. Coleman

(1800 - 1873)

(Father of Annie Coleman Castleberry)

 

"…..I believe that man will not merely endure; he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance."----William Faulkner (1950)

 

Annie Coleman Castleberry’s father was Daniel Thomas Coleman. He was probably born in Greene County, Georgia, around 1800. His father was Eden Coleman (ca 1770 – 1817) and his mother was Nancy Ann Daniel (? – 1825). Both died in Greene County, Georgia. 1

Daniel Thomas Coleman was undoubtedly named after his grandfather (Thomas Daniel). Daniel Coleman was seventeen years old when his father (Eden) died in 1817.

Daniel was married on 7 January 1824 to Clarinda Ann R. Randle. The Rev. Adiel Sherwood in Greene County performed the wedding.2 Clarinda Ann R. Randle was supposedly a cousin of Daniel T. Coleman and surely kin to the husband (John Graves Randle) of her sister-in-law, Sally. John Graves Randle is mentioned above.

The Rev. Sherwood was the original pastor of the Greensboro Baptist church (probably the church attended by the Coleman family) and served until 1831. He was also pastor of the Bethesda Baptist church in Union Point and the New Hope Baptist church. All were located in Greene County, Georgia.3

Clarinda Ann R. Randle’s (ca 1805 - ca 1885) father was William Randle (ca 1778 - 1830) of Brunswick County, Virginia, and her mother was Susan Robinson Rives (ca 1783 - ?) of Maryland.4

Daniel T. Coleman first resided in Greene County, Georgia, where he was probably born, although in the 1920 Mississippi census his daughter (Annie Rosa Coleman Castleberry) states (incorrectly, I think) that both of her parents were born in South Carolina. Greene County deeds5 show transactions for him as early as 1821 when he bought and sold land on Richland Creek. The Coleman family lived on the south side of Richland Creek on land adjoining the Fretland (or Fretwell) and Randle families.6 Richland Creek is about one mile north and west of Greensboro, Georgia. Daniel sold more land on Richland Creek in 1825.7

Two sons were born around this time in Greene County or maybe in Morgan County—William R. in 1827 and Daniel E. in 1830.

By 1830 Daniel Coleman was living in Morgan County, Georgia (with his wife and two male children—Daniel E. and William R.--both less than five years old). His name is mentioned in Morgan County deeds8 as early as 1827. His land was on Indian Creek adjoining the land of his father-in-law (William Randle) who first arrived in the county around 1806. It was during Daniel Coleman’s stay in Morgan County that he served as a justice of the peace.9

Also according to the 1830 census he was the owner of 16 slaves (by 1840 he had acquired 25 and in 1860 he owned 20---seven were mulatto).

By 1840 he was a resident of Coweta County, Georgia, (with his wife, three sons, three daughters and 25 slaves) according to the Federal census. Records for Coweta County show land transactions from 1835 to 1845 for Daniel Coleman.10 In 1836 new merchants in the county were Coleman and Huggins at Oak Lawn.11 So, evidently Daniel Coleman was both a farmer and a merchant during his stay in Coweta County.

In 1838 a fracas in the Newnan Baptist church resulted in a "church trial" (Newnan is the county seat of Coweta County). Helping to settle the matter on April 20 were Medows and Coleman from New Hope Baptist. The trial results were excommunication of Brother Wooten and the exclusion of Brother Bolton---but he was later restored. 12

Around 184213 (as late as 1848 according to land records)14 Daniel T. Coleman moved his family to Mississippi settling about 1 ½ miles south of Egypt, Mississippi, in Chickasaw County. The records for 1848 (Sheriff’s book) and 1851 (county land roll) list his name. From these records it appears that his land was located about 9 miles south of Okolona on present day Highway 45. His property appears to have been on (or very near) the Chickasaw – Monroe County line. His brother-in-law’s name (Willis Randle) also appears in the 1848 records (Sheriff’s book).

Church and land records indicate that Daniel Coleman later attended church and bought land in Monroe County, Mississippi, where his wealthy brother-in-law (James G. Randle) lived on a large plantation named Cotton Gardens (near present day Muldon – about 7 miles southwest of Aberdeen, Mississippi, on state Highway 25). A June 1850 Monroe County deed states that the Goosepond Baptist Church deacons (Daniel Coleman, R. T. Harrison, Samuel Holloway) bought a church building ($100) and four acres of land ($50) from Charles McClendon.15 The land (to be used as a burial ground) was near (probably on) the Aberdeen – Houston Road (Old Houston Road on today’s maps) and about seven miles west of Aberdeen. When traveling east on the Old Houston Road it was only about 4 miles from the Chickasaw-Monroe County line (where Daniel Coleman’s land was located). The Coleman family apparently lived in this area until 1852.

In early 1852 they moved to nearby Pontotoc, Mississippi. According to the minutes16 of the Pontotoc Baptist Church, Daniel and his wife joined the church on 6 March 1852 moving their letter from the Graceland Baptist Church in Monroe County, Mississippi. Did Goosepond Baptist change its name or did the Coleman family move to another church before departing Chickasaw County?

In Pontotoc, Mississippi, the Daniel T. Coleman family had at last come to their final abode, at least for Daniel (he died in Pontotoc 21 years later in 1873) and Clarinda Ann (she died there 33 years later ca 1885). It was in Pontotoc that their children reached maturity and married. Their eldest child (Albert) was already 25 years old in 1852 and Gus was 23. Their youngest daughter (Lina) was not yet born. Their youngest son (William R.) later died in Pontotoc (before 1872) leaving a wife and six children.

The long journey began fifty-two years earlier in Greene County, Georgia, where Daniel Coleman was born (ca 1800) and married (in 1824) and lived until about 1830 when he moved west (for the first time) to Morgan County, Georgia. From Morgan County he moved around 1835 to Coweta County, Georgia, where he lived for the next ten years. Around 1842 he moved west for the third time, this time to Chickasaw County, Mississippi (his land was about 1 ½ miles south of Egypt). From there he moved in 1852 to the town of Pontotoc in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, approximately 350 miles west of Greene County, Georgia, where his sojourn began twenty-five years earlier.

Daniel T. Coleman and his family were active members of the Pontotoc Baptist church from 1852 to 1896. Their names appear frequently in the church minutes. He was a deacon, church clerk (off and on from 1853 to 1866), treasurer (1856 to 18??), a delegate and messenger to various church conferences and a frequent member of various and sundry committees. He and his family often made generous financial contributions to support the church and its pastor. Daniel T. Coleman seems to have participated in almost every church activity except preaching.

The Pontotoc Baptist church (where the Coleman family were members) was formed in 1846 from the Cherry Creek Baptist church. William L. Slack was the pastor from 1853 to 1880.17 He undoubtedly conducted the wedding ceremony for several of Daniel Coleman’s children (i.e., Laura Coleman on new years eve 1857) and the funeral service for Daniel Coleman when he died in 1873. The Rev. Slack was apparently a well-educated man since according to E. T. Winston18 he was president and professor of ancient languages, chemistry, geology, astronomy and mathematics at Mary Washington College in Pontotoc. His daughter (Sarah) taught natural philosophy at the small college.

The minutes reveal several interesting church customs when compared with today’s standards. It was a small church with a fundamentalist bent. The pastor’s job ran for twelve months with a vote taken each year to decide who the pastor for the next twelve months would be. The pastors were mostly selected from the church membership. One church expense was the purchase of wine (apparently used in the Lords supper ceremony). The church met twice a month usually on Saturday, at least the church conference meetings (which were the main subject of the church minutes) were held on Saturday. The pastor usually preached at these meetings, which were followed by the church business session. The doors of the church were open for membership at these Saturday meetings (regular Sunday services also occurred but are not mentioned in the minutes perhaps because no business matters were taken up on Sunday). Black people were members of the church even after the Civil War as late as 1872. In fact there was concern at times that the number of black members would outstrip the white membership. The expulsion of members for drinking, dancing, profanity and other sins of the flesh was common. William C. Castleberry (a grandson of Daniel T. Coleman) was expelled on 10 November 1895 by the Pontotoc church after receiving a report on his "deportment"! 19

Daniel T. Coleman made numerous land transactions in Pontotoc County starting around 1850 and continuing until his death in 1873. One interesting transaction on 29 August 1854 was the gift of Lot 27 in the town of Pontotoc to the Deacons of the Baptist Church20 (present day First Baptist Church). The church minutes for 4 March 1854 say, "D.T. Coleman appointed to buy the church lot". 21 Apparently he later decided to make Lot 27 a gift to the church. The church was soon built only to be destroyed by a tornado on 24 March 1855. 22 One week after the tornado a committee was appointed (31 March 1855) to dispose of the church lot and on 14 April 1855 the lot was sold back to Daniel T. Coleman for $100.00. 23

Daniel T. Coleman is mentioned several times by E.T. Winston in his 1931 account about the early pioneers of Pontotoc, Mississippi.24 General Thomas McMackin is given credit by E. T. Winston as the founder of Pontotoc. When the General left Pontotoc some of his property was bought by Daniel T. Coleman.25 Winston says -----

"Mr. D. T. Coleman bought his (General McMackin) hotel property here and the stable property across the street. Mr. Coleman built a livery stable on the latter property that has lately been remodeled for store and warehouse purposes by Messrs. R. L. Lyon and sons."

Mr. Winston also writes about Mary Washington College in Pontotoc.26 He says-

"Next to Chickasaw College in romantic and general interest was Mary Washington College, which had a brief career, but flourished in the antebellum period of the "golden fifties" when old Chickasaw was like wise in the fullness of its career. As Chickasaw was sponsored by the Presbyterians, Mary Washington College was a product of the Baptists of this section. The college property was on the northern outskirts of Pontotoc, on land now owned by V. L. Bigham. It was burned by Yankee vandals during the Civil War, and was never restored. The institution was established under the patronage of the Chickasaw, Choctaw, Columbus and Aberdeen Baptist Associations and incorporated in 1852. From a correspondent, Rev. E. L. Shettles, of Austin, Tex., several years ago, we gleaned the following additional information"-------The enrollment of this year was 94. Ancient language 12, modern language 6, pupils in music 47. Among the 94 enrolled, Pontotoc and Pontotoc County claimed 47, Chickasaw 9, -----The Rev. Martin Bell was sponsor for more than any other parent. He had in school of his own Sarah H., ----- Daniel T. Coleman had a like number of daughters: Laura E., Emma F., Ann R., Antoinette, Adeline."

In the 1857 wedding announcement for Laura E. Coleman27 Daniel Coleman is referred to as "Judge" Daniel T. Coleman. This came apparently from his service as a justice of the peace in Morgan County, Georgia. 28

In Daniel Coleman’s will (13 Feb 1872) he made his son, Daniel E. Coleman, and his son-in-law, William Castleberry, the executors of his estate.29 He left his interest in the store in Pontotoc (run by William Castleberry) to his wife. He left $100.00 to his thirteen year old grandson, Howard C. Scott. He instructed his executors to sell his property and to distribute the proceeds (after expenses) equally among his wife, his living son (Daniel E.), the six heirs of his deceased son (William R.) and his five daughters. No mention is made of two of his daughters: Antoinette and Sina. I assume they never married and died before 1872. He leaves it up to his executors to decide what to do with his farm equipment and his household furniture.

Daniel T. Coleman died in Pontotoc, Mississippi, on 7 July 1873. I do not know where he is buried (probably in Pontotoc however no record or tombstone has been found). 30

 

 

 

 

Chapter 30 – Children of Daniel T. Coleman and Clarinda Ann R. Randle

The children of Daniel T. Coleman and Clarinda Ann R. Randle were:

1. William R. (1827 – 1869) was born in Greene County or maybe Morgan County, Georgia. He married Josephine B. Swanson on 23 April 1855. Her parents were Richard Swanson, Sr. and Deborah Tarkington. Josephine was born in Tennessee (probably in or near Franklin) on 9 March 1832. After the death in 1869 of her husband (William R. Coleman) she moved to Franklin, Tennessee (probably to be near her parents and other relatives). There she later married Dr. John Harvey of Franklin, Tennessee on 15 February 1882. Josephine died on 22 January 1914 and is buried in Franklin, Tennessee (Mt. Hope Cemetery).

In the 1860 Federal census William R. Coleman was a merchant in Iuka, Mississippi. His younger brother, Daniel E. Coleman, was a member of his household and was also a merchant. They were partners, I suppose.

During the Civil War William served as a private in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry Regiment. His brother, Daniel E., and his Castleberry and Akers relatives were also in Company B. Company B consisted primarily of men from Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

William died in 1869 and in the 1870 Federal census his widow, Josephine, and her six children were living in Tupelo, Mississippi. Living next door was her sister-in-law, Emma F. Weatherall, who was also a widow. Emma later married Henry C. Medford and lived the rest of her life in Tupelo, Mississippi.

Josephine later moved to Franklin, Tennessee where she married Dr. John Harvey in 1882. He died ca 1900. Josephine appears in the 1900 and 1910 census for Williamson County, Tennessee. In 1910 she was living with her son, Edward Randle Coleman.

The heirs of William R. Coleman were mentioned (but not by name) in Daniel T. Coleman’s will in 1872.

The children of William R. Coleman and Josephine Swanson were:

a) Julia A. (1856 - 1911) was born in Iuka, Mississippi on 8 February 1856. She married John D. Morton. He apparently died before 1910 since according to the 1910 census for Williamson County, Tennessee she and her sixteen year old daughter (Lera May) were living in the household of her brother, Edward Randle Coleman. Julia died on 31 May 1911 and she is buried in Franklin, Tennessee at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

b) William Marcus (Squire) (1858 – 1941) was born in Iuka, Mississippi on 28 January 1858. He married Mary F. West. She was born 9 November 1854 and died on 30 October 1935. William died on 1 March 1941. Both are buried in Franklin, Tennessee at Mt. Hope Cemetery. His tombstone inscription reads: Esq W. M. Coleman.

c) Walter Samuel (1862 – 1955) was born in Iuka, Mississippi on 4 May 1862. Around 1900 he moved to the Oklahoma territory where he married Ida Mae Yarborough on 18 May 1900. They had a large family. Walter died in Cordell, Oklahoma on 23 September 1955 and is buried in Dill City, Oklahoma.

One of his descendants, a grandson named Dean Coleman, lives in Stockton, California and much of this material about William R. Coleman I received from him in 2006 and 2007. 1

d) Allie (Abbie) D. (1866 – 1935) was born in Iuka, Mississippi in March 1866. She married Edward M. Sparkman (1866 – 1929). Abbie died in 1935 and she and her husband are buried in Franklin, Tennessee at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

e) Edward (Eddie) Randle (1868 – 1946) was born in Tupelo, Mississippi in March 1868. He married Jessie Wilkins and after her death Valeria Hooper. In 1900, according to the census, he was living in his mother’s household. Ten years later, according to the census for Williamson County, Tennessee, he was a widower with a six year old son (Edger). Living with him in 1910 was his 79 year old mother, Josephine B. Harvey and his younger widowed sister, Julia A. Morton. Eddie died in 1946 when he was 78 years old. He was buried on 21 June 1946 in Franklin, Tennessee at Mt. Hope Cemetery. No tombstone exist for him.

f) Emma C. (1868 – 1946) was born in March 1870 according to the census for 1900. In 1900 she was still living in her mother’s household. Her middle initial was "J" according to the 1900 census but "C" according to her tombstone. Also, she was born in 1868 (not 1870), according to her tombstone. She married Alonzo Nelson after 1900. Emma died in1946 and she is buried in Franklin, Tennessee at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

2. Daniel E. (1830 - ??) was probably born in Morgan County, Georgia. He shows up in the 1860 Federal census in Tishomingo County in the household of his older brother, William R. Coleman.

During the Civil War Daniel served as a 2nd lieutenant in Company B of the 11th Alabama Cavalry Regiment. His brother, William R, and his Castleberry and Akers relatives were also in Company B. Company B consisted primarily of men from Tishomingo County, Mississippi.

Being the only living son, he inherited most of his father’s land when his father died in 1873. He was a member and master of Masonic Lodge No. 91, in Iuka, Mississippi around 1875.2 In the 1870 and 1880 census he was still a resident of Iuka, Mississippi and a retail merchant. Sometime before 1880 he was married since he lists himself as a widower in the 1880 census. Also in 1880, he was living near Rufus Castleberry, the brother of William Castleberry. William Castleberry married one of Daniel’s younger sisters (Annie Rosa Coleman) in Pontotoc, Mississippi in 1862.

Daniel E. Coleman is buried in Pontotoc, Mississippi.

 

3. Laura E. (1835 – 1928) was born on 1 June 1835 in Morgan County, Georgia, and died in Sweetwater, Texas, on 27 March 1928.3 When she was seven years old in 1842 she moved with her family to Mississippi. Laura married the Rev. William Thomas Howard Scott (1830 – 1865) on Thursday, New Years Eve 1857.4 He was a graduate of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. The Rev. Scott died seven years later leaving her with three small children. Their only son, Howard Coleman Scott (1859 – 1938) became a medical doctor and lived in Sweetwater, Texas. Howard is buried in Pontotoc, Mississippi. Laura also had two daughters: Mary Dannie (she married Sheriff J.J. Donaldson) who died in 1913 and Nettie Lavia who died at 9 months of age. Laura Scott was given a letter of "dismision" on 6 March 1858 from the Baptist Church of Pontotoc, Mississippi (she joined on 2 April 1853). She and her husband rejoined the Pontotoc church on 1 March 1862.5 According to Berry5 "at the age of 90 Laura took up the study of calculus to keep herself occupied." Laura Scott lived with her daughter (Mary Dannie) until her daughter died in 1913, then she lived with her granddaughter (Clara Bell Parker) in Dallas and Houston, Texas, and finally with her son (Howard C. Scott) in Sweetwater, Texas, from 1921 to 1928. Laura Scott died 27 March 1928.7

4. Emma F.(1837 – 1885) was born in Georgia on 5 December 1837 and died in Tupelo, Mississippi, on 18 March 1885. She first married R. A. Weatherall on 8 March 1859 and had two daughters Georgia (1868 - 1927) and Laura (1870 - 1925). According to the 1870 census Emma was a school teacher and living in Tupelo, Mississippi with her two daughters. Emma was baptized at the Pontotoc Baptist Church in 1865.8 After her first husband died (before 1870) she was remarried in 1875 to Major Henry (Harvey) Clay Medford (1830 - 1902) of Tupelo, Mississippi (a lawyer and the first mayor of Tupelo). Although referred to as "Major" Mr. Medford was in the Civil War and never rose above the rank of private.9 They also had two daughters, Eualia and Aurora. In 1878 they adopted her four year-old nephew, Memory E. Leake, after his parents died in a yellow fever epidemic. Julius Garnett Berry10 has written a very moving account of Memory E. Leake’s long and productive life.

Emma’s children were:

a) Georgia Weatherall (1868 - 1927) never married. She moved to Birmingham, Alabama, and lived there with her sister Laura.

b) Laura (1870 - 1925) moved to Birmingham, Alabama and married Judge E. J. Robinson.11 They were married ca 1900. Laura was his second wife. In 1900 the judge was living in Ashville, Alabama. His children still under his roof (and their ages in 1900) by his first wife (Lulan) were:

i) Harold B.,16,

ii) Orleane,9,

iii) James L., 8,

iv) Gladis G., 5,

v) Mary O., 3.

By 1910 Judge E. J. Robinson had moved to Birmingham, Alabama and was married to his second wife, Laura Weatherall. He died on 20 March 1910 at age 64 years. In the census for 1910, which was taken just a few weeks after his death, the head of the family (his wife Laura) was listed as Eliska J. Robinson. So, apparently the "E" in E. J. stood for Eliska. The children were all listed as stepchildren, except one---Memory L., age 8. This youngest child, Memory Leake Robinson, age eight years old, was named after his mother’s foster brother and first cousin, Memory E. Leake (1874 – 1962) of Tupelo, Mississippi. At an early age Memory Leake Robinson acquired the nickname, Toby. Maybe his Leake relatives in Tupelo, Mississippi branded him with that name. According to Julius G. Berry’s biography of Memory Leake (p. 77), "Toby Robinson and O. B. Sparks, Laura and Eulalis’s boys, spent much of the long summers with them and kinda grew up with Medford and Memory Hunter (two of Memory Leake’s sons)."

Also listed in the 1910 Robinson household was Georgia Weatherall. She was Laura’s older sister who never married.

By 1920 the Robinson household in Birmingham had dwindled to three people. The three were: Laura (still listing herself as E. J. Robinson), Tobe or Toby, the nickname for Memory Leake Robinson who was 18 years old and Georgia Weatherall, Laura’s old maid sister.

In the 1930 census both Laura and Georgia were missing. So, apparently they died between 1920 and 1930. NOTE: I think Laura died in July 1925 and Georgia died in March 1927. In the 1930 census Memory Leake Robinson listed himself as Toby L. along with his 25 year old wife, Mary, who was born in Ohio. They had been married for 5 years and were listed as roomers in a boarding house in Birmingham, Alabama. Memory Leake Robinson was born in 1901 and he died in 1962.

Today (2007) the building that houses the Cumberland School of Law at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama is named the Memory Leake Robinson Hall. Apparently at some point during the 20th century Mr. Memory Leake (Toby) Robinson devoted a substantial amount of time to that noted institution. A metal plaque inside the building has the following inscription:

Dedicated to Memory Leake Robinson (1901 – 1962), Alumnus, Lawyer, Advocate, Gentleman and Chairman Executive Committee. His Christian Leadership and Vision helped establish the Law School at Howard College [now Samford University]. His Zeal for Excellence in the Law is expressed in high Standards of legal education at the Cumberland School of Law

 

c) Eualia married a Mr. Sparks in Birmingham, Alabama.

d) Aurora married a Mr. Shumate in Birmingham, Alabama.12

e) Memory Leake was adopted in 1878 at age four by Emma and her second husband, Major Henry C. Medford. Julius Garnett Berry10 has written a very moving account of Memory E. Leake’s long and productive life.

5. Mary A. married a Mitchell.

6. Annie Rosa (1840 – ca 1925) (my great grandmother---see Chapter 11) was probably born in Coweta County, Georgia, in October 1840 and died in Lafayette County, Mississippi, around 1925. She married William Castleberry on 27 January 1862 in Pontotoc County, Mississippi. In her Civil War pension applications she states, contrary to the above and erroneously, I think, that she has lived in Mississippi all her life and also that she was married in Lafayette County, Mississippi.

7. Antoinette (Nettie M.) (1845 - ??) was born in Mississippi. She was baptized in 1865 at the Pontotoc Baptist Church.13 Nettie married B. F. Mitchell on 4 May 1868 [Pontotoc County , MS, Missing Marriages (1867 – 1880), p. 17, Hazle Boss Neet]. She was not mentioned in her father’s will.

8. Sina E.(1847 - ??) was born in Mississippi. She was not mentioned in her father’s 1872 will.

9. Adeline E. (Lina) (1854 – 1877) was born in Mississippi. She was baptized at the Pontotoc Baptist Church in November 1865.14 She was only seventeen years old when she married Marcus Memory Gordon Leake on 3 September 1871 in Ackerman, Mississippi (Choctaw County). He was born in Adairsville, Georgia, on 29 September 1845.15 They had two sons, Victor F. (he apparently died soon after birth) and Memory E. Leake. Lina Coleman died in a yellow fever epidemic in Holly Springs, Mississippi, on 6 September 187716 and her husband died on 13 September 1877 (also from yellow fever) in Louisville, Kentucky. He had traveled north with his young son trying to escape that raging disease. Afterwards, her sister, Emma, and Emma’s second husband (Major Medford) in Tupelo, Mississippi, adopted four-year-old Memory E. Leake.17

 

Chapter 31 – Two Servants of Daniel T. Coleman and Clarinda Ann R. Randle

Daniel T. Coleman had a rather large number of servants considering the size of his land holdings and overall prosperity. Also, Daniel seems to have been as much of a merchant as a farmer and therefore would have had an even lesser need for servants.

It is quite likely that some of his servants were inherited by his wife from her father, William Randle, who died in 1830. He was a larger land holder and more prosperous than his son-in-law, Daniel T. Coleman.

According to Federal census records we learn that Daniel had 16 slaves in 1830, 25 in 1840 and 20 in 1860. Of the 20 in 1860, 7 were listed as "mulatto", a rather large ratio (about 35%).

In 1830 Daniel’s father-in-law (William Randle) was the owner of 42 slaves according to the Federal census.

Two servants that apparently belonged to Daniel T. Coleman were Albert and Gus Coleman. In the 1870 census they were living next door to Daniel Coleman, and I therefore initially assumed, incorrectly, that they were two of his older sons. Later, however, a Coleman descendant in Georgia (Patrick Coleman) pointed out to me that they were black citizens and therefore perhaps not the children of Daniel T. Coleman.

The two servants were:

1. Albert (1827 - ??) probably born in Greene County, Georgia. He was married to Claris (1848 - ??). She was born in South Carolina. In 1870 their children were: Gus (15), Mary (11), Margaret (8), Henrietta (5), and Albert (3).

2. Guss (1829 - 1876) also probably born in Greene County, Georgia. He was married to Mary Ann (1828 – 1918). Their children in 1870 were: Edward (7) and Alice (4). Phyllis Green (maybe a sister to Mary Ann) and her three children were also in the household in 1870.

In the census records for 1870 and 1880 Albert and Gus and their wives list themselves as black---with the exception of Mary Ann who list her self in 1880 as mulatto. Another mulatto hint for these former servants is the 1860 slave schedule for Daniel Coleman (mentioned above) where 7 of his 20 servants were listed as mulatto. Of these 7 only two were males. Their ages were 35 and 20, not too far from the ages (33 and 31) of Albert and Gus in 1860.

From the minutes of the Pontotoc, Mississippi Baptist Church the following references are made to Gus and his wife, Mary Ann Coleman.

On 26 May 1867 the Pontotoc Baptist Church met at water and Baptized the following colored candidates: Mary Ann Coleman [wife of Gus], Anna Coleman, and Tempe Coleman, etc., etc.

Gus was baptized later at the Pontotoc Baptist Church on 22 September 1867. The church minutes say (p. 53) that "the colored part of the Baptist Church of Pontotoc, Mississippi met at the water for Baptism." A few days later on 12 October 1867 a petition from 29 colored members was presented to form their own church. Mary A. Coleman and Anna Coleman were two of the 29 colored members petitioning for their own church.

These black church members with a Coleman surname were surely former servants of Daniel T. Coleman and his wife.

Gus’s wife, Mary A. Coleman, is listed as the head of the family in the 1880 census so Gus Coleman apparently died before 1880. In the Pontotoc, Mississippi city cemetery there is a tombstone with the following inscription: Augustus Coleman (husband of Mary A.), born in Greene County, Georgia, on 29 August 1829 and died 15 September 1876.1 Is this perhaps the Gus Coleman above? It surely must be one and the same! Also buried in the Pontotoc city cemetery is a Mary Coleman (1828 – 1919). Is this Mary A. Coleman, the wife of Gus Coleman? I think so.

The Pontotoc City Cemetery was given to the City of Pontotoc by the Chickasaws and the U.S. Government on June 22, 1852, because "many Chickasaws and their white friends were buried there." Maj. Gen William Colbert (son of James Logan1 Colbert) was buried there in 1835. The Rev. Thomas C. Sturart, missionary to the Chickasaws, is also buried in the City Cemetery. 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 32 - Introduction to King Family of Lawrence,

Holmes, and Carroll Counties, Mississippi

My grandmother was Eliza King of Holmes County, Mississippi. Five generations earlier, her ancestor Francis King moved (around 1790) from Maryland to Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Later in 1814 one of his sons (Azariah) moved to Mississippi and settled along the Pearl River near Monticello in Lawrence County. One of Azariah sons was Meshack King who was born around 1799 and who later married Lovisa Whitehead. She was from a wealthy and prominent family that had moved to Lawrence County, Mississippi, from North Carolina around 1802. Meshack and Lovisa’s eldest child was William A. King who was born in 1818. Around 1834 Meshack moved his family from Lawrence County to Holmes County, Mississippi, where he died in 1837. His eldest son, William King, married Eliza Shipp in Holmes County around 1849. One of there off springs was Thomas R. King who was born in 1850. Thomas married Annie Montgomery in 1876. Their children were: Pinckney, John, Eliza (my grandmother), Thomas, Annie, Bayless, and Ellen.

Chapter 33 - Francis King

(ca 1740 - ca 1816)

 

Francis King was probably born in Maryland around 1740 assuming that he was approximately twenty years older than his son Azariah. His wife was Mary and their known children were: James, Francis, Jr., Azariah, Elijah, Susanna and maybe Eliza.1 The order probably indicates their relative ages.

From Virginia land records it is clear that Francis King first bought land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in 1781. Two of his children (James and Azariah) appear to have preceded him to Virginia since James shows up in the tax records2 before Francis and Azariah were married in Orange County, Virginia, in 1780.3

At any rate in 1781 Francis bought approximately 700 acres of land in Spotsylvania County (in a deed dated June 1781 he bought 290 acres of land for £1595 from James Head4 and in a second deed4 two months later he bought 400 acres from Thomas Lipscomb for £4000). I believe this land was located near Waller’s meeting house (to be mentioned later). Both deeds state that Francis King was of the state of Maryland (unfortunately, no county is mentioned).

The next deed for Francis King appears in August 1787 when he (and his wife, Mary) sold 290 acres of land to their son Azariah King (spelled Ezeriah in the deed) for £95.5 Again the deed states that Francis King is of the state of Maryland and Azariah is of the county of Orange in Virginia. The land was adjacent to John Wheeler, Joseph Fines, and Reuben Massey’s land and bounded by James Wiglesworth’s old line. According to tax records6, James Wiglesworth’s land was near Waller’s meeting house.

John Waller was a Baptist preacher and a member of a prominent family. His plantation (Newport) was located on the south side of the Mat River, one-half mile south of Duerson’s store.7 Current maps of Spotsylvania County show Waller’s Church in Berkeley District (where Francis and some of his children lived, including Azariah). This spot is in the southeast part of the county and near the intersection of county roads 738 and 605 and approximately 35 miles due south of Fredericksburg.

Almost ten years later in January 1795 Francis King bought 100 acres of land from Thomas Lipscomb for £74 (witnessed by Francis King’s son, John!) and 7 1/2 acres from William Estes paying him only £4. Both tracts were located in Berkeley Parish of Spotsylvania County, Virginia (on north side of road leading to the church?).8

In December 1798 Francis King and his wife Mary sold 107 acres of Spotsylvania County land to Ruben Moore 107.9

The most informative and puzzling deed was written in December 1804 transferring 400 acres of land owned by Francis King to his children but reserving for himself the use of the land so long as he lived. The children listed were: James, Francis, Jr., Azariah, Elijah, and Susanna. The order probably indicates their relative ages. I believe John King was another son, (not mentioned in this 1804 deed but mentioned in an earlier one)10 who was living in North Carolina in 1787. A second deed on the same date in 1804 appoints James King (probably the eldest son) to be Francis’ lawful attorney.11 For some unknown reason five years later in an August 1809 deed12 Francis King revoked the two 1804 deeds, took back his 400 acres of land and did away with the power of attorney status delegated to his son James! He again gives the names of his children, which are the same except for Elijah (his name is missing) and Eliza (her name is added). The similarity of these two names may mean that only one person is involved, probably Elijah since an Elijah King has been found in property deeds. Did Francis survive a near death illness in 1804 and after a full recovery take back his land? Or did he leave Virginia to take care of some business in Maryland and then return five years later? At least one of the children (Azariah) mentioned in these deeds was no longer living in Spotsylvania County in 1804 for he had moved in 1801 to Wilkes County, Georgia.

Mary, Francis’s wife, is not mentioned in any deeds after December 1798 causing me to believe that she died around 1800.

Francis King’s name appears in the property tax records13 for Spotsylvania County from 1791 to 1815. So, maybe his move to Virginia from Maryland did not occur until around 1790 and he may have died or moved away around 1815.

No records have so far been found for Francis King in Maryland (I do not know the county of his residence) and no record has been found for any service in the Revolutionary War.

I have not found Francis King listed in any Federal census records. In 1790 was he in Maryland or Virginia? In 1800 and 1810 he was in Virginia but the census has been lost for these years and in 1820 he is not listed in Virginia (was he deceased or residing elsewhere, maybe in Kentucky?).

I do not know when Francis King died or where he is buried.

Chapter 34 - Azariah King

(ca 1760 - 1816)

Azariah King was probably born in Maryland around 1760, assuming he was about 20 years old when he married Mary Abell in Orange County, Virginia, on 2 December 1780.1 The marriage record states that he was from Spotsylvania County, Virginia. I think his parents were Francis and Mary King.

The father of Mary King (Azariah’s wife, not his mother who was also named Mary) was Caleb Abell. In some deeds Mary uses her nickname Polly.

The known children of Azariah and Mary King (mentioned in Azariah’s will in 1816) were: George W., Nancy, Meshack, and Shadrack. However there surely must have been more. In an Orange County, Virginia, land deed2 dated 27 September 1787 Azariah King (spelled Ezeriah) bought 218 acres of land from John King of Pasquotank County, North Carolina, for £150. The land was located on the west side of the Mine Run in Orange County. It is quite likely that John King was Azariah’s brother. This land, less one quarter of an acre as buring ground, was later sold by Azariah King to Jesse Tinder (he married Alepear Abell in 17863, probably Azariah’s wife’s sister) on 3 November 1792 for £1504. About six months later on 28 May 1793 another deed5 was needed to make stricter payment arrangements for the above 218 acres. In this second deed Azariah King was of the County of Spotsylvania, Virginia, and witnesses were Caleb Abell (Azariah’s father-in-law) and Elijah King (probably Azariah’s brother). Azariah King is last mentioned in Spotsylvania County in deeds in September and October 18006 so his move to Wilkes County, Georgia, evidently took place soon after that time.

Azariah does not appear in the Spotsylvania County property tax records until 17937 and his last listing is in 1801. So, I assume that he was residing in Orange County, Virginia (west side of the Mine Run in Gordon District) from 1780 to 1793 and in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, (near Wallers’s Church in Berkeley District) from 1793 to 1801 when he moved to Wilkes County, Georgia.

He is listed as a voter8 in 1797 for Spotsylvania County delegates to the general assembly.

Azariah King first appears in Wilkes County, Georgia, records on 30 July 1801 when he acquired 500 acres of land from Jesse Thompson after paying $2000 for land located in the fork of Clark Creek at the mouth of Rocky Branch.9 Later on 8 April 1802 Azariah bought more land on Clark Creek (216 acres for $1466 from Benajah Smith).10 This land was next to the land on which Azariah was living and contained a gristmill. Originally the land was sold to Smith by the famous Revolutionary War hero, General Elijah Clark. Azariah’s name appears in the 1803 Georgia land lottery next to Wylie Bohannon who married Azariah’s daughter, Nancy.11 The tax records in 1804 show Azariah owning 716 acres in Captain Peter Stovall’s District. His land was on Clark’s Creek adjoining land owned by Wooten. He also owned 24 slaves. In 1805 he owned 766 acres in the same location, however the record says his land adjoins land owned by Mathews and his number of slaves was 21.12

Regarding slaves, on 29 April 1811 Azariah was a defendant at an inquest held by the state in Wilkes County at his home upon a dead slave where numerous witnesses testified to their belief that "a slave named John came to death by blows given by his master".13 I do not know the outcome of this inquest.

A less serious matter was brought up before the August 1807 term of the Inferior Court of Wilkes County where a case was heard involving Isaac Bolton vs George King and Wylie Bohannon "for killing 17 of Bolton’s hogs at the home of Aycriah King (Azariah King)".14

So, it appears that Azariah King was in Wilkes County, Georgia, from about 1801 to 1811 and that he resided on the fork of Clark Creek at the mouth of Rocky (or Lick) Branch (I have not been able to pinpoint this spot on current maps).

In 1807 when George W. King and Wylie Bohannon were accused by Isaac Bolton of killing 17 of his hogs (Inferior court case mentioned above) how old must they have been? I assume that by 1807 Wylie was already married to Nancy and that he therefore was at least 18 or 19 years old. If she were 17 her birth year would be 1790 and she would have been born in Virginia before they arrived in Georgia. And George W. King too must have been about 18 and also born in Virginia. Unfortunately none of these people lived long enough to be recorded in the 1850 census! If Azariah was married in 1780 he must have been born around 1760 (assuming that he was about twenty years old when he married, also his wife Mary was in the 45 plus age category in the1820 Lawrence County, Mississippi, census). So, surely all of his children were born in Virginia (his oldest children should have been born starting around 1781). Was Nancy King married to Wylie Bohannon in Wilkes County, Georgia?

In a Wilkes County deed dated 24 May 1811 Azariah King of Adair County, Kentucky, late of Wilkes County, Georgia, gave power of attorney rights to his son, George W. King.15 So, evidently Azariah and his family were residents of Kentucky for several years (1811 - 1814) before moving in 1814 to Mississippi. However, I have found no records for Azariah King in Adair County, Kentucky.

Azariah’s brothers, Elijah King and James King, bought land in Adair County, Kentucky, in 1813 and 1815 (more about this later). Also, the purchase of Kentucky land was mentioned in Caleb Abell’s (Azariah’s father-in-law) will in 1815.

Around 1814 Azariah King moved his family (maybe from Adair County, Kentucky?) to Lawrence County, Mississippi, (his name first appears on the Lawrence County tax roll in 1814).

In 1814 some Lawrence County citizens signed a petition that was sent to the Congress of the United States (they called it a "Memorial") making a plea for a post road through the center of the Mississippi Territory linking Nashville and New Orleans.16 The proposed road would cut through Lawrence County and shorten the distance between those two places (Nashville and New Orleans) by about 150 miles, according to the petitioners. Among the signers of this "memorial" (referred December 6, 1814) were Wylie Bohannon (Nancy King Bohannon’s husband), George W. King, S. King (Shadrack I would guess), Zariah King (Azariah no doubt), and Meshack King.

Did these Lawrence County piney woods citizens realize that they were up against stiff competition from the affluent and landed aristocrats in Natchez just 50 miles to the west? They too had proposed a post road south from Nashville, not however to New Orleans but to their up and coming city. Years later this historic and infamous road became known as the Natchez Trace.

At the time of his death in 1816 Azariah had land holdings in Georgia (presumably in Wilkes County) and in the Mississippi Territory. He was listed on the tax rolls for Lawrence County, Mississippi, for 1814 and 1815 with 460 acres of land located on the Pearl River.17 In 1816, after Azariah’s death, his widow, Mary, was listed on the Lawrence County tax rolls. George W. King, Azariah’s son, was also listed for the 1814 - 1815 time period.

Azariah died between 25 January 1816 (date his will was written) and 9 February 1816 (power of attorney deed from Mary King to her son George W. King stated that Azariah was deceased).18

From Azariah’s will19 we learn that his wife was Mary and that he had one daughter, Nancy, and three sons: George W., Shadrack, and Meshack. When Azariah died in 1816 Nancy was married already to Wiley Bohannon originally of Wilkes County, Georgia, and later of Lawrence County, Mississippi, and only George W., the oldest son, was "of age". This is an odd circumstance for a couple married 36 years earlier in 1780. Surely they had other older children who perhaps by 1816 had moved to other parts of the country or had died. Assuming the children mentioned in Azariah’s will in 1816 were approximately twenty years old they would have been born around 1796 when Azariah and Mary were residing in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. By then they had been married and living in Spotsylvania County (or next door in Orange County) for sixteen years!

Also, from Azariah’s will it appears that none of his sons were married. Each son received three Negro slaves, cows and calves, two suits of clothes and a good saddle horse and a silver watch. Nancy, Azariah’s married daughter, was "loaned" two Negro slaves during her natural life. Mary, his wife, received "all my Negroes not otherwise disposed of" and the balance of Azariah’s property. His "good friends" were Harmon and Howel W. Runnels and Alexander Hall and the executor and executrix of his will were George W. King (son) and Mary King (his wife).

Azariah and the children mentioned in his will died young (as perhaps did some of his children whose names do not appear in his will). Azariah died at about age 56 in 1816, George W. at about age 34 in 1824, Shadrack at about age 29 in 1827, and Meshack at 38 in 1837. I don’t know when Azariah’s wife (Mary) and daughter (Nancy) died.

Unfortunately no Federal census records exist (to my knowledge) for Azariah King.

To summarize, Azariah King was in Orange County, Virginia, (west side of Mine Run in Gordon District near present day county road 692) from 1780 to 1793; in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, (near Waller’s Church in Berkeley District near the intersection of present day county roads 738 and 605) from 1793 to 1801; in Wilkes County, Georgia, from about 1801 to 1811 where he resided on the fork of Clark Creek at the mouth of Rocky (or Lick) Branch; in Adair County, Kentucky, from around 1811 to 1814; and finally in Lawrence County, Mississippi, (near Monticello and the Pearl River) from 1814 to his death in 1816 at about age 56 (assuming he was 20 years old when he married in 1780).

 

Chapter 35 - James, Francis, Jr., Elijah, and John King

 

The children of Francis and Mary King (other than Azariah) were James, Francis, Jr., Elijah, John, Susanna and Eliza.1

James King was married to Susannah (called Sucky in some deeds). His name shows up in Spotsylvania County property tax records2 as early as 1782 and as late as 1815. He appears to be the original King family member in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. His name is on a Spotsylvania County list3 as one who supplied corn to the Revolutionary War effort. He voted for Spotsylvania County delegates to the general assembly in 1797, 1800, and 1813.4,5,6 In the 1798 Direct Tax list for Spotsylvania County7 his land is listed as being on Pike Run. In the tax records8 for 1812 and 1813 his name is listed as the Rev. James King! By 1804 his son’s name (James, Jr.) was also listed in the tax records. Both James and James, Jr. are listed in the 1810 federal census for Spotsylvania County and in the 1820 and 1830 census for Adair County, Kentucky. James was a witness on deeds9 for his brother Azariah in 1792 and for John (another brother, I think) in 1800. Also in 1800 James bought 219 acres from Azariah10 (Caleb Abell, Azariah’s father-in-law, was a witness) and sold 109 acres to brother John.11 In an 1804 deed he was given power of attorney status for his father (Francis King) until it was revoked in 1809.12,13 All of these transactions were in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.

In 1805 James King bought 100 acres of land using a deed14 that was witnessed by Azariah and Elijah (his brothers) and by John Abell (Azariah’s brother-in-law). In 1809 James sold to brother John 105 acres of land that was adjacent to land formerly owned by Azariah King.15 Finally in 1812 James bought land from Vass and Lansley16 in probably his last land purchase in Spotslyvania County since he, his son (James, Jr.), and his father do not appear in the tax records after 1815. I believe they moved that year to Adair County, Kentucky, to join Elijah (from Orange County) and Azariah (from Wilkes County, Georgia) who had only recently moved to Kentucky.

In October 1815 James King bought approximately 300 acres of land in Adair County, Kentucky, according to two deeds.17,18 The land was situated on Harrods Fork and Croons(?) Creek.

These numerous deeds point toward a definite family connection between James and his father, Francis, and between himself and his brothers, Azariah, Elijah, and John.

The only distinguishing Spotsylvania County record found so far for Francis King, Jr. (other than his father’s 1804 and 1808 deeds where he is listed as a son) is a tax record19 for the year 1813 listing separately both himself and his father. Until I found this record I was worried that some of the records thought to be for Francis, Sr. might actually be for Francis, Jr. Although this in fact may still be the case I feel more confident that it is not.

Elijah King was a witness for his brother James on a Spotsylvania County deed in 1805.20 Apparently Elijah lived only in Orange County (west side of the Mine Run) which explains why his name does not appear in the Spotsylvania County tax records. His name does however appear frequently in the Orange County deed books beginning in 1788 and lasting until 1813.

Elijah’s name also appears in deeds in Adair County, Kentucky, in 1813 and 1814.21,22 Jerimiah Abell was a witness to the 1813 deed23 for land bought by Elijah in Adair County which was located near Abell’s land and near the Upper Lick and Butter’s (or Butler) Fork. Elijah’s name also appears in the 1820 and 1830 census for Adair County, Kentucky.

John King first appears in Orange County, Virginia (west side of the Mine Run) in a 1783 deed.24 In 1787 he sold his brother Azariah 218 acres of land in Orange County. In this deed25 John King is of Pasquotank County, North Carolina, where he apparently lived before moving to Virginia. John probably moved from Orange County to Spotsylvania County around 1800 since he had land transactions26 involving his brothers in Spotsylvania County. In an 1808 transaction he sold land that was adjacent to land owned by James King and Joseph Duerson27 (Duerson’s land was near Newport28 which was near Waller’s Church in the southeast part of Spotsylvania County). This transaction further confirms the probable location of the King land in the Berkeley District of Spotsylvania County as being near the intersection of present day (2002) County Roads 738 and 605 and approximately 35 miles due south of Fredericksburg. John first appears in the Spotsylvania County tax records in 1800 and he is listed there each year until at least 1821. Incidentally, John shows up in the tax records after 1815 so apparently he did not make the move to Adair County, Kentucky, with the rest of the King family.

I have no information on the two daughters (Susanna and Eliza) mentioned in the 1804 and 1809 deeds by Francis King.

 

Chapter 36 - Mary Abell King

(ca 1760 – ca 1825)

Mary Abell was married in Orange County, Virginia, to Azariah King on 2 December 1780.1 They had at least four children (probably more).

Her father was Caleb Abell who died in Orange County, Virginia, in 1815 (his will2 was written on 8 January 1815). The children named in his will were: Caleb, Richard (married Ann), Susannah (married Joseph Hilman on 11 Sept 1805), Elizabeth, John (married Margaret Tinder on 5 Oct 1777 and later Sally King on 30 Jul 1805), Nancy (married George Scott on 15 Oct 1807), Sally and Jose. The order may indicate their age. Other possible daughters not mentioned in the will were Alepear who married Jesse Tinder on 11 Dec 1786 and Margaret who married John Jones on 7 Sept 1783.1 Caleb Abell’s wife was not mentioned in his will so she apparently died before 1815.

Caleb Abell willed that his property (mansion house and 900 acres of land) be sold and the money used to "lay out" land in Kentucky to be equally divided among his children.

Mary Abell King (the widow of Azariah King) was remarried to Samuel C. Alexander of Lawrence County, Mississippi, according to a deed3 written on 5 February 1818. In the deed Alexander refers to George W. King as his step-son and gives the land on which he now lives (located in Lawrence County at S12 T7 R21W) and five slaves to his step-son after Mary (his new wife) dies. In another deed4 on 5 February 1818 Alexander refers to Mary as his "now" wife and includes the words "in consideration of a marriage already solemnized" which I take to mean a marriage that had only recently occurred. So, Mary was remarried about two years after the death of Azariah to a man much younger than herself (she was in the 45 plus age category and Samuel was in the 18 - 25 age category in the 1820 Lawrence County census---at least a 25 year difference if the census information is correct!).

Samuel was a justice of the Lawrence County court system around 1820 according to deeds recorded in Deed Book A. In these deeds Mary signs her name with her mark so apparently she was unable to read or write. So far I have found no trace of Samuel and Mary Alexander in the census records after 1820! What happened to them?

 

 

Chapter 37 - Nancy King

(ca 1790 – ca 18??)

Nancy King married Wylie Bohannon probably in Wilkes County, Georgia. Wylie Bohannon’s name appears in the Georgia tax records and land records in close alliance with Azariah King. For example their names appear together in the 1803 Georgia land lottery with each having two draws.1 In the minutes2 of the Wilkes County Inferior Court (1811 - 1817) it says that Wylie Bohannon, 14 years old and Buddy Bohannor 4 years old orphans of William Bohannon dec’d bound to John D. Overstreet, farmer. The Bohannon family settled on Newford Creek in Wilkes County.

I think Nancy was born before the family moved to Georgia. I do not know when or where she died. In fact I have found nothing about her or her husband after her father died in 1816.

 

Chapter 38 - George W. King

(ca 1788 - 1824)

George W. King (ca 1788 - 1824) married Sarah R. ?? (both were in the 25 - 44 age group in the 1820 census). They evidently had no children since none are mentioned in his Lawrence County will1 which is dated 3 October 1824. However he left land to a nephew, George W. King, his namesake and the son of his brother Shadrack. He left his wife, Sarah R., thirteen Negro slaves, three were "loaned" to her until she remarried (which she soon did) or died (which she also soon did), then they were to go to his brother, Meshack King. Also to Meshack he willed two Negro slaves, his horse (Sampson), saddle, watch, etc., and one-half of his library of books (the other half to his wife). His "trusty friends" were Alexander Hall (also mentioned by Azariah King in his 1816 will) and Joseph Cooper. George W. King was a Chief Justice of the Quorum (C.J.Q) (?) of Lawrence County according to deeds2 in 1818 and 1819. Brother George W. King preached the sermon on at least two occasions (16 March 1822 and 18 May 1822) at the Bethany Baptist Church (still standing in 1980 and located just south of Prentiss, Mississippi, in Lawrence County on Hwy 13 at junction of the old St. Stephen’s Road).3

George W. King’s widow, Sarah R., was remarried on 5 May 18254 to Zebulon E. Pendleton and she died soon afterwards according to an 1828 Lawrence County land deed.5

 

Chapter 39 - Shadrack King

(ca 1798 - 1827)

In 1816 Shadrack King (ca 1798 - 1827) was a commissioner for the construction of a public building in Lawrence County, Mississippi, according to Strickland and Edwards.1 He also was the clerk of the Pearl River Baptist Association upon its founding in 1820 and one of the first ministers of the association along with William Whitehead (brother of Lovisa King).2

Shadrack married Belinda ????? around 1818.

He was bonded for $6000 on 27 February 1823 along with the tax collector Samuel Stamps and David R. Hubert. Apparently all three men were county officials.3

Shadrack King apparently died in 1826 at age 28 (his Lawrence County will is dated 27 July 182?).4 By the time his will was probated on 3 March 1828 Belinda (his widow) had remarried5 on 13 May 1827 to Richardson David Ransom!

Seven years later, according to a Probate Court record dated April 1835 for Carroll County, Richardson D. Ransom (Belinda’s second husband), was petitioning the court to appoint a guardian for his step children, Carr A. King, Addison M. King, George W. King, and Shadrack King, all minors! What happened to Belinda? Did she die leaving her second husband with four minor step children? Apparently so!

Shadrack King, who was a minor in 1835, was listed in the Probate Court record but he was not mentioned in his father’s will (seven years earlier) except to say that if his wife were pregnant (he undoubtedly suspected that she was) the unborn child would share equally with the other children. So this Shadrack King is obviously the child born probably in 1827 after his father died in 1826.

Carr Able (about 22 years old) and his wife are listed in the 1840 Carroll County Federal census in the 20 to 30 year old age bracket. They had two sons under 6 years old and owned 13 slaves.

According to a Carroll County, Mississippi, estate record6 dated 14 Oct 1841 the guardian of Shadrack’s son, George W. King, was one A.M. King (Addison M. King was George’s older brother). A sum of money was divided between George W. King, A. M. King and S. King (Shadrack King). The estate record goes on to say that "said guardian (A. M. King) would further state that he has advanced to George W. King, who is now studying medicine in Philadelphia, the sum of five hundred and fifty dollars, thereby leaving a balance due George W. King of one thousand six hundred and sixty dollars and 30 cents". In 1841 George W. King would have been about 20 years old.

Nine years later, in 1850, Carr Able (the oldest son) was living in Lafayette County, Mississippi, with his wife, Margaret and children; Augusta A., 11, Shadrack, 10, George W., 6, and Addison M. G. , 4. Carr Able’s age is given as 32 and his occupation is physician.

In 1850 George W. and Shadrack (two youngest sons) had married and were living in Carroll County, Mississippi, where they were next door neighbors. The 1850 Federal census shows that George W. was married to Susan D. and had two sons: Azariah, age 3, and George W. age 1, and a 4 month old daughter named Elizabeth. Shadrack was married to Sarah A. and had three daughters: Epharamian G. age 4, Belinda M. age 3 and Lovisa A. age 1 month. He also had a two year old son, William Cicero. Both list farming as their occupation. What happened to George W. King’s medical training in Philadelphia in 1841?

By 1860 Shadrack had moved to Scott County, Mississippi. The number of family members was unchanged.

NOTES: "A" Shadrack King (1840 - 1913) and his wife Priscilla Ann (1841 - 1923) are buried in the Salem Methodist Cemetery in Attala County, Mississippi.7 "A" Carr A. King (1856 - 1934) and wife Martha Ella are buried in County Line Baptist Cemetery in Leake County, Mississippi, near Attala County.8

Shadrack and Belinda King’s children were:

Addison McGehee

George W. (mentioned in his uncle George W. King’s 1824 will; according to the 1850 census his wife was Susan D.)

Shadrack (born in 1827 after the death of his father)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 40 - Meshack King

(1799 - 1837)

Meshack King, the fourth child of Azariah and Mary King, was born around 1799, most likely in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. In 1816 Meshack was apparently not yet 21 since his father’s will states that he is to receive his portion "when they (Shadrack and Meshack) become of age". On 13 May 1820 Meshack received four Negroes, ten cows and calves, one saddle horse and saddle, one silver watch, two suites of clothes, and all the property left him in his father’s will, so he apparently turned 21 in 1820 making his birth date 1799.

Meshack married Lovisa Whitehead around 1817. He is listed in the 1820 census for Lawrence County, Mississippi, with two sons less than 10 years old (one son was William A. King, my gg-grandfather, who was born in 1818). Meshack was still residing in Lawrence County in 1830 with seven children (3 sons and 3 daughters under 10 and one son 10 to 20). The one son 10 to 20 was William. The other son apparently died, if the census is correct. Susan (born in 1822) and Mary Ann (born ca 1826) are two of the three daughters. So, there are 3 sons and 1 daughter that are unaccounted for that were listed in the 1830 census. And Meshack and Lovisa had other children after 1830! Two were Laura Lovisa (born in 1833) and Meshack who was probably born in 1838 (after his father died in 1837).

On 13 Aug 1827 Meshack’s name, along with several others, including W. W. Whitehead, were on a $10,000.00 bond for Augustus B. Saunders who was elected sheriff of Lawrence County in an election on the 6th and 7th of August 1827. Land records indicate that Meshack King was still residing in Lawrence County in 1834 or at least he was still selling land there as late as 1834. On 1 Jan 1834 he sold 560 acres in Lawrence County (S14,T7,R21W) to Bryan G. Whitehead for $4500.00. On 27 Feb 1834 Meshack King of Lawrence County, MS, granted power of attorney to Mark Noble, "my true and lawful attorney".1

Meshack King was a probate judge in Lawrence County. Flora Blair Whitehead, the recently widowed wife of William T. Whitehead (his relationship to the Whitehead family has not been determined), appeared before him on 27 January 1834 in Lawrence County to post a bond for her children, now orphans.2

A year later on 26 May 1835 Meshack King (the surviving partner of Samuel Hunter, deceased) of Holmes County, Mississippi, sold to Neylans & Jelks of Lawrence County, Mississippi, for $350.00 part of lot Number 6 fronting on the Public Square in Monticello, Mississippi. Witnesses were John McGaha and B.G. Whitehead (Meshack’s brother-in-law).3

So, apparently around 1835 Meshack moved to Holmes County, Mississippi. Earlier, in 1820 when he was 21 years old, he purchased land in and around Holmes County. Land patent records for 1820 show that Meshack bought 80 acres in Carroll County (East 1/2 of SE1/4 of S22,T16N,R5E) and 90 acres in Holmes/Attala Counties (W1/2 of NW1/4 of S2, T16N, R5E). In 1835 he is listed as the owner of 159 acres of land in Carroll County4 (T16, R5E ). This land is about a mile inside Carroll County and almost at the point in the county where present day U.S. Hwy 51 first enters Carroll County going north from Holmes County.

Around 1834 Meshack apparently owned a considerable amount of property, judging from the number of slaves in his possession. In a Holmes County deed5 in June 1834 the names of 29 slaves are listed and used as security for a loan of $6000 from the Agricultural Bank of Mississippi. Again in August 18346 he uses his slaves as security for a loan of $27,000 with lending institutions in Natchez and New Orleans. The names of 51 slaves are listed in this later deed. However, it appears that some names are common to both list.

Meshack died in 1837 at the age of 38 leaving no will! Why would a former probate judge leave no will? Probably because his death was rather sudden. The probate of his property proved to be quite involved and dragged on until about 1842. Initially, in August 1837, Meshack’s wife, Lovisa, was appointed administrator of his estate7 by the Carroll County Probate Court but the following year the court replaced her and named her brother, Bryan G. Whitehead, administrator. At the October 1837 term of the Carroll County Court a notice was given saying that the personal estate of Meshack King, deceased, was not sufficient to pay his debts! The notice also called for a citation to be published for 30 days in the Free Trader Publication of the City of Natchez notifying creditors with claims against the estate to come forward. A newspaper notice in the Holmes County Lexington Union stated that the land and plantation of Meshack King, deceased, was to be sold on 17 December 1838 by B. G. Whitehead, Administrator.8 Similar notices were also run in the Carrollton, Mississippi, Enquirer. Commissioners of Insolvency were appointed to examine and report to the court on the claims which they determined came to $48,588.63 and in the end were paid at only about 4 cents on the dollar! Why would a resident of Holmes County have his property probated in Carroll County? Perhaps Meshack’s principal land holdings were in Carroll County. In any case it appears that his wife, Lovisa, and his eight or so children were left with very little.

According to the 1830 census Meshack and Lovisa had eight children. By 1837, when he died, they had at least two more.

Since Meshack left no will the 1850 census is one of the few records available to determine who his children were. Unfortunately, in 1850 Meshack’s widow (Lovisa) had an immediate family that consisted of only herself and two children: Susan, age 28 and Meshack, age 9 (age 9 must be an error if his father died in 1837).

William A. King, who was living in Holmes County in 1850, was a son of Meshack and Lovisa King (probably the eldest child). William named one of his son’s Meshack after his father and another one William Whitehead after his mother’s father. William A. King gave 40 acres of land in Holmes County to his mother in 1854 (Lovisa Morris was her name after she was remarried in 1844). Two years later in 1856 she gave over 1000 acres of Holmes County land to him and in this deed9 she refers to William as her son.

 

 

Chapter 41

Lovisa Whitehead King

(ca 1797 - ca 1865)

Meshack King’s wife was Lovisa Whitehead. Her parents were Rev. William Whitehead (ca 1767 - 1822) and Susannah Edmunds who were married in North Carolina and moved (around 1806) to the Natchez District in Mississippi (they appear in the 1810 census for the Natchez District.1 Later, in 1812, Reverend William Whitehead (he was a Baptist minister) bought a considerable amount of land near the Pearl River in Lawrence County, Mississippi.

The Whiteheads were a prosperous family in Lawrence County, Mississippi, in the early 1800’s and later in Carroll County, Mississippi, as well. An excellent book about this family has been written by Dr. E. Grey Dimond.2 From his research and from William Whitehead’s will3 in 1822 a considerable amount of information is known about this prominent Mississippi family.

The original family member on American soil was Arthur Whitehead (born about 1650) who immigrated with his mother to Virginia from England before 1659.4 He married Mary Goodwin (?) and one of their children was William, born about 1685 in the Isle of Wight in Virginia. William married Rachel (McKinney?) and one of their children was Lazarus, born about 1726 in Halifax County, North Carolina. Lazarus married Mary (Bryan?) and had the following children: Lazarus, Jr., Isaac, William (born about 1767 near Swift Creek in Nash County, North Carolina), Mary, Nancy, Patsy, Betsy, and Sarah (or Sally).5 This William was the Reverend William Whitehead who moved from Nash County, North Carolina, to Lawrence County, Mississippi, around 1806.

The children of the Reverend William and Susannah Whitehead were:

Lovisa (ca 1797 - ca 1865)

William W. (1799 - 1870)

Bryan G. (1803 – 1853)

Edmunds G. (1806 - 1884 )

John B. (ca 1808 - ??). John was "afflicted in mind" according to the will.

Lovisa Whitehead married Meshack King around 1817. William W. Whitehead married a relative of Jefferson Davis, Elizabeth N. Davis (1810 - 1854) and after she died he married Martha W. ???, Bryan G. Whitehead married Mary P. Jenkins and Edmunds G. Whitehead married Martha Jennett Scott (1818 - 1880). These families later migrated to Holmes County and Carroll County, Mississippi, where they had extensive land holdings and it is in Carroll County that many of them are buried.

William W. Whitehead, who married Elizabeth N. Davis, became a lawyer and later a judge.

Brayn G. and Mary P. Whitehead migrated from Lawrence County to Holmes County, Mississippi, where their names appear often in land records allied with his sister’s husband, Meshack King. Bryan G. Whitehead was probably residing in Holmes County in 1838 when he served as the administrator for Meshack King’s estate. In 1850 Bryan owned 13 slaves according to a slave schedule for that year for Holmes County.6 No record has been found for Mary P. Whitehead’s death date or her final resting place. Their daughter and only child, Sarah Elizabeth, died in 1850 at the age of 20 and is buried in the Old Middleton Cemetery, formerly in Carroll County but now in Montgomery County, Mississippi.7 Bryan G. Whitehead died on 27 Oct 1853 and he is also buried in the Old Middleton Cemetery.8

Lovisa Whitehead, the eldest child and only daughter, was born in North Carolina around 1797 as were her brothers; William W. in 1799, Bryan Goode in 1803, Edmunds Grey in 1806 and John B. in 1808.

So, Lovisa was approximately nine years old in 1806 when her family moved to Mississippi. Around 1817 she married Meshack King in Lawrence County. He was about 18 years old and she was about 20.

By 1830, according to the Federal census, they had eight children. After 1830 at least two more children were born before Meshack King died in 1837. The only children whose names are known are: William, Susan, Mary Ann, Laura Lovisa, and Meshack, Jr.. William was born ca 1818, Susan was born in 1822, Mary Ann was born ca 1826, Laura Lovisa was born in 1833, and Meshack, Jr. was born in 1838.

William King married Eliza Shipp around 1849 and they had four children. William died in 1859. He and his wife are buried in the Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County.

Susan King never married and died after 1850 (in the 1850 Carroll County census her age is given as 28). She is buried in an unmarked grave beside her sister, Laura Lovisa, in the Olliphant plot in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Enterprise, Mississippi.9

Mary Ann King was born ca 1826 (according to the 1850 census for Carroll County, Mississippi) and she was married to William W. Wall on 20 January 1843 in Carroll County.10 In 1850 William and Mary Ann were listed in the Carroll County Federal census with four children. They were: Eleanor C., 7, William W., 5, Robert E. 3, and Lovisa, 5 months. Mary Ann’s husband, William, was a bricklayer and was born in Virginia ca 1821. His brother, Alexander P. Wall, was living with the family and he too was a bricklayer. On 16 March 1854 Lovisa Morris, Mary Ann’s mother, deeded several slaves (Chloe, Mary, Dennis, and Betsy) to Mary Ann.11 In this deed she identifies Mary Ann as her daughter.

I have no information on Meshack, Jr. other than his age that was given as nine years old in the 1850 Federal census for Carroll County, Mississippi. This must be slightly off since his father died 13 years earlier in 1837.

I have been unable to find Lovisa King in the 1840 census. In the 1850 census for Carroll County she is listed as Lovisa Morris having remarried in Carroll County on 5 Sept 184412 to the Reverend Nathan Morris of Holmes and Carroll Counties. He was a "hard-shell" Baptist preacher according to Mr. Hamilton, the Carroll County historian.13 Five years later in October 1849 when the Reverend died his will was probated in Holmes County.14 He is buried in Holmes County beside his first wife, Pentelope.

Lovisa Morris’ name does show-up in land records for Clarke County, Mississippi, from 1855 to 1860. She bought land15 from James M. Seals on 26 June 1855 (313 acres for $6,260.00 ) and a few months later on 24 November 1855 she paid Stephen Holingworth and his wife $2,289.00 for 327 acres.16 This last deed mentions that she is a resident of Holmes County. On 1 February 1856 she deeded the 313 acres (land on Shoebooty Creek) that she bought from Mr. Seals to her daughter, Laura Lovisa Olliphant.17 In the deed she states that in the event of her daughter’s death the 313 acres were to go to Laura’s husband, Dr. S. R. Olliphant. No need to worry however since Laura sold the land in 1859 to Henry E. Coleman for $6260.00 and used this money on 9 January 1860 to buy six slaves from her husband.18

Earlier, Lovisa Morris also had land dealings with Mr. Coleman selling him on 20 December 1857 the 327 acres that she bought in 1855 from Stephen Holingworth for $4087.50 (she paid $2,289.00).19 On 29 June 1859 Lovisa Morris paid Harvey Jones $2200.00 for 160 acres20 and then in less than a year (on 29 March 1860) she sold this land to her son-in-law, S. R. Olliphant, for $2000.00 and at the same time sold him four slaves for $5400.00.21 This is the last land record found so far in Clarke County for Lovisa Morris.

According to an account written around 1940 by Etna Olliphant Moseley (a daughter of Dr. Samuel Ruherford Olliphant, Sr. by his second wife) Lovisa Morris moved to Enterprise, Mississippi, in 1863 to take care of her grandchildren after her daughter, Laura Lovisa Olliphant, died in January 1863.22 However, I think Lovisa moved to Enterprise around 1855 judging from land records for both Clarke and Holmes Counties. In an 1856 Holmes County deed23 she states that her residence is Clarke County, Mississippi (Enterprise is in Clarke County). Also, in the 1860 census for Clarke County, Mississippi, living next door to Laura Lovisa and her husband, Dr. S. R. Olliphant, is an L.C. Morrison, age 62. I think that this is Lovisa C. Morris.

In a special census24 taken in 1866 for Clarke County, Mississippi, no trace of Lovisa was found.

So, did Lovisa Morris die in Clarke County and is that where she is buried? Or is she perhaps buried in Montgomery, Holmes, or maybe even Carroll County, like her brother, Bryan G. Whitehead, who died in 1853 and is buried in the Old Middleton Cemetery which is now in Montgomery County, Mississippi. Or is she maybe buried in Holmes County like her son (my gg-grandfather), William A. King, who died in 1859 and is buried in the Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County, Mississippi. I do not know where her first husband (Meshack King) is buried but her second husband (Nathan Morris) is buried in Holmes County.

About the death of Lovisa Morris a small book written by Richard H. Whitehead and printed in 1903 had this to say on page 11 about Lovisa: "The death reaper has mowed down the dear and beloved parents and many of the children, but several of us yet survive. Aunt Lovisa, my father’s sister, was a woman of strong character and intellect, and we all cherish her memory. She died at my sister’s, Mrs. Martha Young, between whom there was the strongest mutual attachment." NOTE: Martha Lovisa Whitehead Young (1837 - 1881) was the wife of John O. Young (1814 – 1866), the sheriff of Carroll County, Mississippi. Martha Lovisa was obviously named after her Aunt Lovisa. Richard H. Whitehead (1836 - 1912), the author of the small book, was first a lawyer but soon became a Baptist minister. He served Baptist churches in Mississippi, Texas, and Florida. His father was Judge William Whitehead, the brother of Lovisa Whitehead King-Morris. Richard H. Whitehead lived the last 23 years of his life in Palmetto, Florida (Manatee County), where he was pastor of the Baptist Church. [Dr. E. Grey Dimond Book, p. 52]

The above remark by Richard H. Whitehead in his small book leads me to believe that Lovisa Morris may well be buried in Carroll County, probably in the Old Middleton Cemetery which is now in Montgomery County, Mississippi.

An interesting aside is given in Dr. Dimond’s book25 about the grandson of Judge William W. Whitehead (Judge Whitehead was the brother of Lovisa King Morris). The grandson’s name was Joseph Brown Whitehead (1864 – 1906) and he was born in Oxford, Mississippi (his father was the Reverend Richard H. Whitehead who graduated from the University of Mississippi in 1855). Joseph Brown Whitehead (he was the first cousin of William A. King, my gg-grandfather) was a lawyer and a businessman of considerable success in Chattanooga, Tennessee. In 1899 he and his law partner (Benjamin Franklin Thomas) were able to contract with the Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta for the sole rights to bottle and sell Coca-Cola throughout the United States. Seven years later Joseph Brown Whitehead suddenly died at age 42 while vacationing with his family in Virginia. His wife, Lettie Pate Whitehead (1872 - 1953), and two small sons inherited the perpetual bottling contract. She was remarried in 1913 to a Colonel Arthur Kelly Evans. The two sons died in their forties. The Joseph B. Whitehead, Sr. Department of Surgery at Emory University in Atlanta was endowed by her and her son (Joseph B. Whitehead, Jr.) in the 1930’s. The Coca-Cola Company finally bought back the bottling rights in 1975 for a reported 35 million dollars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 42

Laura Lovisa King and Samuel Rutherford Olliphant

 

Laura Lovisa King (daughter of Meshack and Lovisa King) and Samuel Rutherford Olliphant were married in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 26 July 1849.1 He was born 28 August 1828 and was a prominent physician in Enterprise, Mississippi, and later in Mobile, Alabama. She was born in Holmes County on 25 August 1833. Some Clarke County, Mississippi, deeds record her given name as Lovisa Laura, which I think is an error since other records (her daughter’s name and her wedding information) use Laura Lovisa. Unfortunately, her tombstone just says L. L.

Their children were: William Davenport (1851 - 1868), George Robert (1852 - 1934), Samuel Rutherford, Jr. (1855 - 1921), Laura Lovisa (died as a child), Horace King (Jack), Howard Sandford and Emily (died when three months old).2

On 16 March 1854 Lovisa Morris, formerly Lovisa King and Laura Lovisa’s mother, deeded several slaves (Mariah, Martha, and Anderson) to Laura Lovisa.3 In this deed she identifies Laura Lovisa as her daughter.

Around 1855 Dr. Olliphant moved his family to Enterprise, Mississippi, in Clarke County.

Laura Lovisa died on 7 January 1863 at the age of 30 (from complications during the birth of Emily who died when three months old) and Dr. Olliphant died 36 years later on 3 March 1899 in Mobile, Alabama. He was married three more times; to Mary Elizabeth Boothe on 14 Oct 1863, to Virginia J. Mayloe of Gallion, Alabama, and finally to Orline Wilson in April 1896 in Meridian, Mississippi. He survived all his wives save the last one.

Dr. Olliphant’s service in the Civil War began in 1862 (one record says that his first assignment was in August 21, 1862, with General Price). His service record reveals that he was an assistant surgeon and was attached to hospitals in Enterprise, Mississippi (Forney’s Division Hospital), and Meridian, Mississippi (Way Hospital). For his professional services he was paid $110 a month. The pay allowance for forage for his horse was $8 a month, room allowance was $15 a month per man and for a cord of wood the allowance was $3 per month. Some of the men mentioned in the military records who worked with him during the war were: S. P. Moore (surgeon general), M. J. Moses (assistant surgeon), Major M. F. Berry, Fran R. (a slave nurse who was paid 60 cents a day!), W. B. O’Grier (post surgeon), and Captains J. M. Burris and W. C. Ford (quartermasters). Toward the end of the war the records seem to indicate that his location was mainly at the Way Hospital in Meridian. A record dated 5 February 1865 states that he was working at the Zumtard (?) Hospital in Meridian, Mississippi, and that special order number 41 had placed him under the jurisdiction of a military district headed up by P. B. Scott. His last service record (his parole) is dated 14 May 1865 at Meridian, Mississippi. He was a prisoner of war and a part of the Army of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, surrendered by Lt. General R. Taylor, C. S. A.

During the war Dr. Olliphant was elected president of the surgical board of the Confederate Army.4

Dr. Olliphant’s fourth wife, Orline Wilson Olliphant, filed a Civil War pension application in 1922 in Newton, Mississippi, where she was living. In it she states that her husband enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862 in Clarke County, Mississippi, and though not belonging to any unit he was attached to the 5th and 8th Mississippi Regiments.

A special 1866 census5 for Clarke County, Mississippi, shows seven males (Dr. Olliphant and his five sons plus an unidentified male between the age of 51 - 60!) in the Olliphant household and only one female (his second wife, Mary Elizabeth). No blacks (former slaves) are listed. Who is this older man?

Samuel and Laura Lovisa Olliphant are buried in the Odd Fellows Cemetery in Enterprise, Mississippi.6

Chapter 43 - William A. King

(1818 - 1859)

William A. King was born on 7 February 1818, probably in Lawrence County, Mississippi, and he died at age 41 in Holmes County on 25 September 1859.1

His parents were Meshack and Lovisa (Whitehead) King according to a Holmes County deed on 8 January 1856 where Lovisa refers to him as her son.2 William named his second son Meshack (after his father) and his third son William Whitehead (after his mother’s father).

William married Eliza Shipp around 1849. She was born in Mississippi on 1 February 1828 and died on 24 July 1883. Her parents were Thomas Shipp (? – 1856) and Mariah ??.

On the 20 November 1854 William and Eliza King gave 40 acres of land in Holmes County to William W. Whitehead, Edmund G. Whitehead (William’s uncles), and Lovisa C. Morris (William’s remarried mother).3 Two years later, on 8 December 1856, William and Eliza sold 160 acres of land for $2000.00 in Holmes County to James M. Cross.4 And finally on 22 March 1858, William and Eliza sold 480 acres of land in Holmes County to James M. Hayes and Armistead G. Otey for $1120.00.5

William A. King’s father-in-law, Thomas Shipp, died in 1856. His will6 was probated in Holmes County in October 1856. According to his will he had at least three sons; William W., Daniel, and John M. Other than William A. King, Thomas Shipp had at least one other son-in-law, C. S. Whitcomb. In Thomas Shipp’s will his wife was mentioned but her name was not given (her name was Mariah according to a Holmes County deed7 in 1854). Other Holmes County land deeds reveal that Thomas Shipp had sons named Ira S. and Nathan S. and a daughter named Mary Emily.

William A. King lived only three years after the death of his father-in-law. William died on 25 September 1859 (typhoid fever was the cause of death according to the 1860 Mississippi mortality schedule). His will was recorded 18 October 1859.8 In it he names his wife Eliza King and his four children. Witnesses were: William A. Denton, William Melton, and William W. Shipp, his brother-in-law.

In the 1870 Federal census Eliza King and her three sons (Tom, Pinkney, and William) were living together in Holmes County. Her daughter, Isabella, is not listed so apparently she had married and moved away. Eliza died on 24 July 1883. William and Eliza King are buried in the Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County.9

The children of William and Eliza King were:

Thomas Rhorea, (10 Jan 1850 - 31 Dec 1935) (my great grandfather). See more on him in Chapter 41.

Pinkney Meshack, (13 September 1851 - 28 Sept 1876). He is buried in the Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County (Holmes County RootsWeb Internet Information)

Isabella, (28 Sept 1853 - 31 Dec 1897). She married W. F. Gresham

William Whitehead, (1857 - ???). Named after his mother’s father

William and Eliza are buried in the Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 44 - Thomas Rhorea King

(1850 - 1935)

William A. King’s eldest child, Thomas Rhorea King, was born on 10 January 1850 in Holmes County, Mississippi, and died at the age of 85 on New Years eve, 1935. He married Annie Montgomery in Holmes County, Mississippi, on Thursday, the 21st of December 1876. Twelve years later in September 1888 he and his wife, Annie, were baptized in the Durant First Baptist Church. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church] He was 38 yeas old and she was ??.

According to his granddaughter, Maybelle St. Clair Hull (1918 - 2001) "Tom King was a very shrewd man, especially when it came to managing his financial matters. He sent most of his children to college and later bought homes for several of them. He helped them out financially in countless ways, even after they became adults". Maybelle told me in 2000 that when she knew her grandfather he had a white beard and would ride into Durant, Mississippi, on his horse. He helped the St. Clair family out a lot after her father (John Joseph St. Clair) died in 1918. Maybell was seventeen years old when her grandfather (Tom King) died.

Tom and Annie King had the following children:

Pinkney M., b Jan 1878; He was married in 1914 to Georgia ???. They had no children. Pinkney graduated in 1899 from the University of Mississippi. While at the University, where he studied law, he was a very active member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon social fraternity. His senior photograph appears in the Ole Miss Year Book for 1899.1 The picture caption reads "A bold bad man"! Activities listed for him, other than his social fraternity, were: Member of the Junior Promenade Committee; Member and Vice-President of the German Club; Gun Club; Jackson Hall Egg Club; Glee Club (Primus Donnus); Blackstone Club; and Tennis Association.

He was single and living at home in Durant, Mississippi, according to the 1910 census. His occupation was given as lawyer. In the 1920 census he and his wife were living in a boarding house in Laurel, Mississippi. His occupation was given as railroad employee. His wife’s name was not given (her name was Georgia according to the 1930 census). She was 35 and was born in Georgia. According to the 1930 census Pinkney owned his home in Laurel, Mississippi, and his occupation was railway mail clerk. His personal worth was given as $3500.00 and he owned a radio. He married at age 36 (his wife was 24). Her age in the 1930 census was 40 (she was 35 ten years earlier in the 1920 census?).

John M., b 22 March 1880; married Pauline Weiner on 24 September 1902. She was born in 1886. He was the Durant, Mississippi, postmaster from 1913 to 1923. John died on 13 September 1923 from malaria according to his death certificate (No. 15626).

The day after he died his wife was appointed the "acting" postmaster (she obviously was already a post office employee). Pauline became the postmaster on 1 January 1924 and served until 1928.

According to Tom King’s will (written in 1931) he helped John’s family in many ways including giving him a home and large sums of money, therefore nothing was left to John’s heirs when Tom King died in 1935!

John and Pauline had two daughters listed in their household in the 1920 census; Dorothy (age 16) and Meredith (age 14).

Dorothy moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where she died in 19??. She was married but took back her maiden name (Dorothy King) after her husband died. She left all of her money (she had a considerable amount of IBM stock) to Southwestern University in Memphis.

Meredith King married Tom Mason after Tom was divorced from Ellen King (Ellen King was my grandmother’s sister and Meredith King’s aunt). After Tom Mason and Meredith King married they moved to Greenwood, Mississippi.

Eliza (24 May 1883 - 7 Nov 1959) was my grandmother (Granny). Her mother, Annie Montgomery King, died in 1898 at age 39 leaving seven children ranging in age from four to twenty. Granny at fifteen years old was the eldest daughter; therefore on her shoulders fell much of the burden of caring for the family, at least for the next four years. Granny often said that she raised her four younger brothers and sisters, her three children, and two of her grandchildren (me and Tomberry). Granny attended Blue Mountain College at Blue Mountain, Mississippi, in Tippah County. She was a student there in June 1900 when she was 17 years old according to the Federal census for Tippah County.

Thomas R. (Dec 1885 - ?) No trace of him was found in the 1920 census; he may have married Helen Chattiams on 10 May 1905 in Carroll County?? No mention is made of him in Tom King’s will written in 1931. According to unsubstantiated family rumor Thomas shot a man dead over a poker game dispute and fled to South America to avoid prosecution. I have no proof that this is a true story.

Annie (March 1888 - July 1980) was living with the family of her older sister (Charles and Eliza Castleberry) in 1910, according to the census. She married John Joseph St. Clair (1877 - 1918) on 28 December 1911 in Holmes County, Mississippi. The St. Clair family lived on Madison Street in Durant two or three houses from the public school. They had two children; John Clifton (1915 - 1989) and Maybelle (1918 - 2001). John Clifton never married. Maybelle married Donald T. Hull (1913 – 1993) and moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where she died on 4 February 2001.

William Bayless (or Bailis) (26 May 1889 - 10 Apr 1954) was living at home and farming in 1910 and 1920 according to the census. As a young man he attended several prepatory schools. The WWI records for Holmes County (p. 161) show that he was a corporal in the Engineering Corps (Company C, 526 Engineers and Company A, 501 Engineers) during World War I. He served oversees from 10 July 1918 to 16 June 1919 and was honorably discharged on 26 June 1919. Later on he developed a bad drinking problem which caused a great deal of trouble and money for his father, Tom King, who once remarked that "if he had all the money back that he had spent keeping Bayless out of jail and out of trouble he would be a very rich man". Bayless (or Bud as he was known around Durant) married Eva Pritchard in Holmes County according to the marriage license (Marriage Book 3, p. 87) which is dated 4 March 1921. He died in Holmes County in 1954 at the age of 64.

Ellen (3 Feb 1894 - Oct 1984) (SS No. 426 07 9706) attended Belhaven College in Jackson, Mississippi. According to the census, in 1910 and 1920 Ellen was living with her older sister’s family (Charles and Eliza Castleberry) in Durant. She later married Tom Mason but they were divorced in 19??. Ellen did not remarry. Tom later married Ellen’s niece, Meredith King, the youngest daughter of John and Pauline King. Tom and Meredith moved to Greenwood, Mississippi, where Tom was a pharmaceutical salesman. Ellen Mason is buried in Moorhead, Mississippi.

Four years after Annie Montgomery King died on 16 Nov 1898, Thomas King married his second wife, Elma Merritt, on 25 March 1902 -- a Tuesday. He was 52 and she had just turned 24 (the same age as Thomas King’s eldest child!). The marriage, by the Reverend E. S. Lewis, occurred in Holmes County. Elma was born on 17 March 1878 in Black Hawk, Mississippi, in Carroll County and her parents were F. M. Merritt and Laura Johnson according to her death certificate (No. 2395) in 1942. No children were born from this marriage.

In Elma Merritt King’s will2 she bequeathed and divided her Holmes County land, stock, money and personal effects between her brother, W. T. Merritt, her sisters, Lucile Merritt Gordon, and Louemma Fondren (Mrs. R.J. Fondren), her brother-in-law, Alex Gordon, her nephew, Alex Gordon, Jr. and her niece, Lemma Lucile Gordon. It appears that they were all residents of Jackson, Mississippi.

Elma Merritt King died at the Baptist Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi, on 26 February 1942 from heart disease and pneumonia according to her death certificate (No. 2395). She was 63 years old. Elma is buried in Cedar Lawn Cemetery in Jackson, Mississippi.

Granny’s two sisters, Annie and Ellen, I knew from frequent family visits. I never knew Granny’s brothers. I don’t recall very much ever being said about them. One of them, Thomas, killed a man over a poker game dispute and escaped to South America to avoid prosecution, according to family rumor.

According to the 1910 Federal census for Holmes County, Mississippi, Pinkney was a lawyer and still living at home with his father, stepmother, and brother, Bayless. Bayless (or Bud) was a farmer, according to the census.

In the 1920 census Pinkney and his wife were living in Laurel, Mississippi. Bayless was still living at home and was a farmer, like his father. Ludie Smith was an adopted 18 year old daughter in the household.

Tom King died on 31 December 1935 just a few days before his eighty-sixth birthday. According to his death certificate (No. 18434) he was a patient in the Holmes County Community Hospital in Lexington and had a foot infection that resulted in amputation of his little toe on his right foot on 29 December 1935. The cause of death was given as pneumonia.

Tom King’s will3 is dated 23 July 1931. In it he left his wife, Elma, all his household goods and livestock. Also, lots 3 and 4 in Durant, Mississippi, plus 160 acres of land and another 6 1/2 acre parcel near by, all in Holmes County.4

To his five living children (Eliza, Annie, Ellen, Pinkney, and William Bayless) he left lots 1 and 2 in Durant plus 560 acres (to be divided equally) in Holmes County.5 This land was located approximately along and on both sides of U.S. Hwy 51 for several miles and just northeast of the present day (2000) Durant city limits. Interestingly, some of this land is adjacent to 480 acres of land sold in 1858 by Tom Kings’s father (William A. King) to Hays and Otey. Perhaps Tom King inherited some of his land from his mother, Eliza. Tom King was only nine years old when his father died in 1859.

To his daughters, Ellen and Annie, he left $5000.00 and $2000.00, respectively. To Elma (his wife), Eliza, and Annie (his daughters) he left all the money in his bank account plus proceeds from any notes due him, to be equally divided. To the heirs of his deceased son John (he died in 1923 and was the postmaster in Durant) he left nothing since "he already has given large sums of money to him during his life time and he has given his heirs a home".

No mention is made of his son Thomas, who would have been 49 years old in 1935 if he were still alive. According to some family reports he fled to South America to avoid prosecution for murder.

The last King family home place was built outside Durant around 1893. It was later owned by members of the Howard’s family after Tom King’s second wife (Elma) died in 1942. It burned to the ground around 1970. A local artist using photographs of the house did a sketch in 1989.

Chapter 45 - Eliza King Castleberry

My grandmother (Granny), Eliza King Castleberry, was born in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 24 May 1883 (as a student at Blue Mountain College she gave her age in the June 1900 Federal census for Tippah County, Mississippi, as 17 which, if accurate, makes the 1882 date on her tombstone incorrect). She was probably named after her grandmother (Eliza Shipp King) who died on 24 July 1883. Eliza King Castleberry had two sisters and four brothers. Her two sisters, Annie and Ellen, I knew from frequent family visits. I never knew her brothers. According to a family story, one of them, Thomas, killed a man during a dispute in a poker game and escaped to South America to avoid prosecution. Very little was ever said about this. In fact not much was ever said about any of Granny’s brothers. It was always regarded as too sensitive a subject for discussion.

Her mother, Annie Montgomery King, died in 1898 at age 39 leaving seven children ranging in age from four to twenty. Granny was fifteen years old and the eldest daughter, therefore on her shoulders fell much of the burden of caring for the family. She often said that she raised her younger brothers and sisters. Her two sisters (Annie and Ellen) even lived with Granny for several years after Granny was married in 1905.

Granny’s father, Thomas Rhorea King, was born in 1850 in Holmes County, Mississippi, and died at the age of 85 on New Years eve 1935. He married Annie Montgomery in Holmes County, Mississippi, on 21 December 1876 (after she died in 1898 he was remarried to Elma Merritt in 1902). The King family home was outside Durant and was owned by the Howard family after my great-grandfather died. It burned to the ground around 1970. A local artist using photographs of the house did a portrait in 1989.

In 1900 my grandmother was a student at Blue Mountain College in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, (Tippah County). She was fond of recalling how when she went to college the students arrived on the train in the fall and remained there until Christmas vacation. Then, on returning after the Christmas break, they remained until the school year was completed.

Granny was married in the First Baptist Church in Durant, Mississippi, to Charles Rufus Castleberry. Their wedding took place on a Wednesday, the 25th of January 1905, the coldest January day my grandmother ever knew -- so she often said. After the wedding and the customary festivities the new bride and groom retired, each to their respective domiciles. They could not yet afford a place of their own, so Granny said.

Granny was a strict disciplinarian and frugal to a degree that is scarcely conceivable today. She would bleach the large cloth signs advertising Pennzoil motor oil which she got from Bick’s service station and make underwear for Tomberry (my brother) and me. Tomberry laughingly told this story years later to a group of fellow students in a dormitory room one cold winter night at Mississippi Delta Community College adding that when he would turn his underpants inside-out the oil cans could still be plainly seen!

Granny’s moral habits were Victorian. She was an extremely domineering person and was fairly intolerant of those whose morals did not conform to a straight and honest pattern of living.

She always spoke of her ancestors in glowing terms, especially her father, Tom King. She had a tremendous amount of pride in her family heritage and generally thought that the flat landed Mississippi Delta where she lived the last 40 years of her life was a backwater region of the state compared to Holmes County in the Mississippi hill country.

I never heard her utter a profane word or ever knew her to partake of any alcoholic beverages except once when on the advice of the Moorhead physician, Dr. Lynch, she drank a glass of beer nightly just before retiring to increase her weight and provide a more restful sleep. This she did for several months quitting when the desired results did not occur. She had several odd remedies for her medical problems. For example, she always slept with an old high heel shoe pushed against her side at night to prevent "gas pains". Many times I have seen her gag herself with her fingers to force herself to throw-up to get relief when she had an upset stomach. She often used a muster plaster on her chest for exactly what ailment I don’t remember. She and Bick always took a pinch of senna leaves right before retiring for bed.

She always referred to my grandfather (Bick) as "Mr. Castleberry", even when speaking with him face to face.

She was a staunch member of the Moorhead Baptist Church. The Women’s Missionary Union was her special interest. She made a remark a few years before she died that I have always thought curious in view of her many years of devotion to church work. Some one brought up the subject of the life hereafter. To this Granny remarked that "she had done all that she could for the Lord and if that was not enough she guessed she would just have to go the bad place".

Granny had a very keen intellect. She loved to read and in her old age received many hours of pleasure playing the card game solitaire. She was an expert seamstress. In my early years almost all of my clothes were made by her. She had a Singer sewing machine that was powered with a foot petal.

Granny took a lot of pride in the fact that she not only raised three children of her own but two grandchildren as well. Tomberry and I lived with Granny and Bick from 1938 to 1946 (from the time she was 55 to 63 years old and I was 3 to 11 years old). She also had every reason to be proud for the home she provided her two younger sisters, Annie and Ellen. According to the Federal census, they were both living with Granny and Bick in Durant in 1910. Granny and Bick were married in 1905 – how long after that did the sisters move in? I do not know. I assume that Annie moved out when she married John Joseph St. Clair on 28 December 1911. But Ellen (Big Ellen we called her to distinguish from my first cousin, Ellen King Castleberry Ewing) was still living with Bick and Granny in 1920. Probably Ellen moved out around 1922 when Bick and Granny moved from Durant to Moorhead, Mississippi. According to the Federal census their eldest son Charles King and his wife Mary were living with Granny and Bick in 1930. For several years right after World War II their youngest son, Thomas Coleman and his wife Annie Laurie, and their daughter, Ellen King, lived with Granny and Bick. To their credit I never heard a negative remark from Bick or Granny about any of these live-in relatives.

Granny died in her sleep in January 1959 after suffering for several years from Parkinson disease. She is buried beside her husband in Durant, Mississippi, in the Mizpah Cemetery.

Chapter 46 - Introduction --The Montgomery Family

 

 

My grandmother (Eliza King Castleberry – b.1883 – d.1959) often spoke of her Montgomery heritage and was very proud to be a descendant of this prominent family. She was well acquainted with her Montgomery grandparents since her grandfather (John G. Montgomery) lived until 1926 and her grandmother (Sarah Elizabeth Montgomery) lived until 1906. Her paternal grandparents (William King and Eliza Shipp King) died before my grandmother was born.

My grandmother’s mother was Annie Montgomery (11 Sept 1859 - 16 Nov 1898) who was married on 21 December 1876 to Thomas R. King in Holmes County, Mississippi.

Annie Montgomery’s father was John G. Montgomery (1835 – 1926). His father was James D. Montgomery (1809 - 1865) and his father was Charles P. Montgomery , Jr. (1781 – 1851). And finally Charles, Jr.’s father was Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. (1748 – 1820) who immigrated to America from Ireland.1

The following men (Charles P. Montgomery, Jr., James D. Montgomery and John G. Montgomery) are direct ancestors of Annie Montgomery King.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 47 – Charles P. Montgomery, Sr.

(1748 - 1820)

Both Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. (1748 – 27 September 1820) and his wife Margaret Reynolds (1752 – 16 August 1818) immigrated to America from Ireland probably before their marriage in 1774.1 Their twelve children were all born in South Carolina, most if not all in the Fairfield District. Two of their sons were Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. and Hugh Montgomery.

Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. served in the South Carolina Militia during the Revolutionary War.2 He served under General Francis Marion in 1774. He joined the 96th District Militia of South Carolina in 1774, serving as a private, sergeant, and later Captain, until 1782. In 1782 he transferred to Sumter's Brigade, Camden District Militia of South Carolina, serving until his discharge in 1782. There is a plaque inscribed with his name in the Duncan Presbyterian Church, Laurens County, South Carolina.
On this subject another researcher says: Although CHARLES MONTGOMERY (1748-1820) did serve in the Revolution, his name is not included on the DAR list on a plaque in the Duncan Presbyterian Church, Laurens Co. SC. --- at least it is not included in the list found on the Lauren County on-line site.

Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. is buried in the Old Brickyard Church in South Carolina.3

Chapter 48 – Charles P. Montgomery, Jr.

(1781 - 1851)

Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. was born 16 June 1781 in Fairfield District, South Carolina.1 He married Elizabeth Thompson (21 February 1790 – ?) in South Carolina. His parents were Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. (1748 – 1820) and Margaret Reynolds (1752 - 1818). Both Charles, Sr. and Margaret immigrated to America from Ireland probably before their marriage in 1774. Their twelve children were all born in South Carolina, most if not all in the Fairfield District. Two of their sons were Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. and Hugh Montgomery.

Charles, Jr. and Elizabeth had nine children. One son was James D. Montgomery, my direct Montgomery ancestor.

Hugh Montgomery married Isabella Bell and they had five children. One son was William Bell Montgomery who was one of the founders of Mississippi State University in Starkville.

James D. Montgomery and William Bell Montgomery were first cousins.

Chapter 49 - James D. Montgomery

(1809 - 1865)

James D. Montgomery was born in 1809 in Williamsburg District, South Carolina. He died in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, around 1865. His wife was Harriet Rabb (1815 – ca 1855). James D. Montgomery’s parents were Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. and Elizabeth Thompson.

James married Harriet Rabb in South Carolina around 1834 and two years later, in 1836, they migrated to Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, according to John G. Montgomery’s Civil War pension application. They remained in Oktibbeha County for the rest of their lives. Harriet died around 1855 and James died ten years later.

James and Harriet Montgomery had the following children:

John G., was born 27 May 1835 in Williamsburg District, South Carolina and he died 29 October 1926 in Durant, Mississippi. He married Sarah Elizabeth ??? ca 1859. She was born 15 May 1842 and died 1 April 1906. John and Elizabeth were my great great grandparents. John enlisted in the Civil War in February 1862. At that time he was living near Bowling Green, Mississippi, in Holmes County. He was in the 28th Mississippi Regiment and rose through the ranks to Captain.

William G., born in 1839 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

Samuel A., born in 1841 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. He married Virgina L. ??? in 1867. She was born in 1847. Their children were: Robert A., T.P., and Ella (married a Brister), Mary (married a Melton), and David F. Samuel A. Montgomery died in Holmes County in 1924 (his will was written in 1906 and recorded in Will Book No. 4, p. 111 in Holmes County on 27 January 1925).

Robert A. Montgomery married Anne ???. They had two sons: Claude and Robert A., Jr. Robert A. Montgomery died in Holmes County in 1929. His will was written 15 November 1928 and recorded 28 June 1929 (Will Book No. 4, p. 257). His brother, T.P., was a witness.

Renthia, b 1843 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

Sarah E., b 1847 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

James R., b 1851 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

David G., b 1854 in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

Jane, b ????

Chapter 50 - John G. Montgomery

(1835 - 1926)

John Glazier Montgomery (27 March 1835 – 29 October 1926), the eldest child of James D. and Harriet Montgomery, was born in the Williamsburg District of South Carolina in 1835 and moved with his parents to Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, one year later, according to his Civil War pension application. That would put the family’s arrival date in Oktibbeha County as 1836. John had six younger brothers and sisters.

After Harriet died, around 1855, this Montgomery family moved to Holmes County, Mississippi. There John soon met and married Sarah Elizabeth ???? (15 May 1842 – 1 April 1906). Their first child, Annie – my great grandmother, was born in 1859 in Holmes County, Mississippi.

On 28 February 1862 John enlisted in the Confederate Army in Grenada, Mississippi. He was 27 years old and was living in Holmes County near Bowling Green, Mississippi (about 10 miles northwest of Durant). He began as a Private in Company A (Captain J. T. McBee’s company) of the 28th Regiment, Mississippi Volunteers, Armstrong's Brigade, Jackson's Division. In October 1862 he was promoted to Corporal and his company became known as McAfee’s Hussars with Captain McAfee replacing Captain McBee. One year later in 1863 he was promoted to Sergeant. He continued to rise through the ranks to become a Captain in 1864. Later that year on Christmas Day he was wounded near Palaski, Tennessee, during Hood’s retreat from Nashville. His right arm was broken and eleven pieces of bone were later removed, so he states in his 1922 pension application.

In August 1879 John G. Montgomery and his wife (Sarah Elizabeth) joined the Durant First Baptist Church. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church] John by this time was 44 years old. Was he just late joining the church or did he maybe move from out in the county into town?

John G. Montgomery died in 1926 and is buried beside his wife in the Mizpah Cemetery in Durant, Mississippi.

The children born to John G. and Elizabeth Montgomery were:

1. Annie, (11 Sept 1859 - 16 Nov 1898) (Eliza King’s mother and my great grandmother). She married Thomas R. King in Holmes County on Thursday -- 21 December 1876.

2. William A., (1864 - ??) He is not listed in the 1920 census.

3. John Wallace, (17 Apr 1867 - 5 Dec 1928). He married Louise Johnson (17 March 1871 - 21 March 1951). John Wallace and Dona Montgomery joined the Durant First Baptist Church by letter in 1895. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church] I assume that Dona was his wife so apparently Louise was also known as "Dona". In the 1920 Holmes County census it says that John Wallace Montgomery was a farmer and that he owned his home free from a mortgage. John Wallace’s will (Will Book No. 4, p. 223) was written on 18 July 1928 six months before his death and recorded on 16 January 1929. In it he willed his entire estate to his wife, then on her death equally to his children. His wife lived another twenty-three years dying in 1951 when she was 80 years old.

John Wallace and Dona had the following children:

a) Charles McGee (born 17 October 1899), age 20 in 1920. According to the WWI records for Holmes County (p. 195) Charles McGee Montgomery was a private in WWI serving at least some of his enlistment time at the Students Army Training Camp at the University of Mississippi. He was honorably discharged on 11 December 1918. In 1920 Charles and John Wallace, Jr. were drug store salesmen. Living with the family in 1920 was John G. Montgomery who was 84 years old.

c) John Wallace, Jr., was 16 in 1920.

d) Annie Louise (she married a Hudson);

4. Frances E., (Feb 1870 - ???)

5. Charles, ( 1874 – 13 September 1894) He was baptized at the Durant First Baptist Church on 18 November 1886. [Rev Matt Brady e-Mail on 14 Aug ’06---Records of Durant First Baptist Church]

 

6. John Glazier , Jr., (3 Jan 1885 - ???) In the 1920 Holmes County census he has a 25 year old wife, Maxine (?), and a two year old son, William G. According to the census John owned his home free of any mortgage and was a farmer.

Chapter 51 - William Bell Montgomery

(1829 - 1904)

My Grandmother (Eliza King Castleberry) often remarked that one of her Montgomery relatives played a part in the early beginnings of Mississippi State University and that Montgomery Hall at Mississippi State was named after this relative. Montgomery Hall was named after William Bell Montgomery (1829 - 1904) who was born in Fairfield, South Carolina on 2 August 1829. His parents were Hugh and Isabelle Montgomery. Hugh migrated to Oktibbeha County in 1834 when the white population of the county was only about 350. The following year he was joined by Isabelle and their six year old son, William Bell.

Hugh Montgomery died in September 1849 in Oktibbeha County at the age of 53 from "lungs disease" according to the 1850 census Mortality Schedule.

At the age of twelve William Bell was sent to a preparatory school in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and later to Erskine, a Presbyterian college in Due West, South Carolina. From there he went to Princeton University where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1850. He returned to Starkville, Mississippi, to read law in a private law office. In 1852 he married Julia Gillespie, the daughter of Dr. William Gage Gillespie. Five children were born.

Julia Gillespie Montgomery died of pneumonia six days after her youngest child was born. William Bell Montgomery later married Sarah Glenn.

William Bell Montgomery’s great-grandson, Gillespie V. "Sonny" Montgomery from Meridian, Mississippi, served with great distinction in the U.S. Congress from 1966 to 1996 representing the 3rd Mississippi congressional district. His autobiography was published in 2003.1

To recap, William Bell Montgomery was born in Fairfield District, South Carolina in 1829 and John G. Montgomery (my grandmother’s grandfather) was born in Williamsburg District, South Carolina in 1835. William Bell’s father was Hugh Montgomery (1796 – 1849). John G. Montgomery’s father was James D. Montgomery (1809 - ca 1865). William Bell and John G. both arrived in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, as infants at about the same time (1835 and 1836) with their respective families. In the 1840 Mississippi census the two families were living next to each other in Oktibbeha County. Hugh Montgomery was James D. Montgomery’s uncle. Hugh’s brother Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. was the father of James D. Montgomery. So, William Bell Montgomery and James D. Montgomery were first cousins. My grandmother was right. William Bell Montgomery was kin to her, he was a distant cousin.

NOTE: Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. was the father of Charles P. Montgomery, Jr. and Hugh Montgomery.

References and Notes

Chapter 1 – References and Notes

1. Castleberry and Allied Families, ed., Dr. Jesse Wendell Castleberry, 1967, 12404 Summerport Lane, Windermere, Florida, 34786. Also, Castleberry and Allied Families, Volume II, 2003, ed., Dr. Jesse Wendell Castleberry, 12404 Summerport Lane, Windermere, Florida, 34786, E-Mail:jcastleberry@cfl.rr.com

2. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, 22 – The Castleberry Family, p. 26, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D., Apt. 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, Copyrighted and privately published in 2002. NOTE: Dr. Brackin is a direct descendant of James Castleberry through Sarah Castleberry and Jackson Akers. Many details used here have come from his research.

3. Ancestors of Ola Castleberry Blau, George Blau, 1118 Windridge Drive - Dunwoody, Atlanta, Georgia, 1989, (Family Files, Georgia Archives, Atlanta)

4. Castleberry and Allied Families, ed., Dr. Jesse Wendell Castleberry, 12404 Summerport Lane, Windermere, Florida, 34786, 1967, p. 1

5. Ibid, p. 2 – 3

6. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, 22 – The Castleberry Family, p. 26, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D., Apt. 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, Copyrighted and privately published in 2002

 

 

Chapter 2 – References and Notes

1. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D.,Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 15 (copyright and privately published in 2002)

2. Ibid, p.12

3.Ancestors of Ola Castleberry Blau, George Blau, 1118 Windridge Drive - Dunwoody, Atlanta, Georgia, 1989, p. 27 (Family Files, Georgia Archives, Atlanta)

4. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D.,Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 16 (copyright and privately published in 2002)

5. McNairy County, Tennessee, Tennessee, Deed Book E, p 102

6. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book D, p. 209

7. Ibid, p. 449

8. Lawrence County Alabama Early Records (Marriages 1818 – 1827), Odalene Ponder,

p. 5

9. The Family of John Casselberry, John Dixon, Memphis, Tennessee, 1993, p.1

(privately published material)

10.Lawrence County Alabama Early Records (Marriages 1818 – 1827), Odalene Ponder,

p. 1

11. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D., Apt 419,

500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 18 (copyright and privately

published in 2002)

12. Jane, the given name for Mark’s wife may be incorrect. I have misplaced the source.

Other Castleberry researchers do not accept Jane as being accurate.

13.Official Bonds of Tishomingo County, Mississippi (1837 – 1848), also see Castleberry Genealogy Miscellaneous Research Results (my unpublished personal material), p. 147.2

14. Marriages of Old Tishomingo County Mississippi, vol I, (1837 – 1859, Mrs. Irene Barnes, 1978, Iuka, Mississippi, p. 5

15. Ibid, p. 18

16. Castleberry Cousins, Family Journal published quarterly and edited by Mrs. Juanita Connally and Mrs. Gwen L. Salsig, vol I, Oct 1989, p. 11

17. Ibid, p. 39

18. Castleberry Cousins, Family Journal published quarterly and edited by Mrs. Juanita

Connally and Mrs. Gwen L. Salsig, vol II, no. 2, May 1990, p. 6

19. Lawrence County Alabama Early Records (Marriages 1818 – 1827), Odalene Ponder,

p. 5

20. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book K, p. 561

21. McNairy County, Tennessee, Cemetery Listings (1824 – 1984), Albert Brown, Bethel

Springs, TN

22. According to Pat Jones of McNairy County, Tennessee, Isaac Castleberry wife's

maiden name was Pratt and not House. (E-mail correspondence on 9 Nov 1998)

23. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book B, p. 484

24. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book I, p. 402, Land located in McNairy County at Range 5, Section 2

25. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book K, p. 561 (Location was Township ?, Range 5, Section 2)

26. McNairy County, Tennessee, Deed Book K, p. 561, Land located in McNairy County at Range 5, Section 2 and Range 5, Section 5

27. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D., Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205 (copyright and privately published in 2002)

 

Chapter 3 – References and Notes

1.Castleberry Cousins, edited by Mrs. Juanita Connally and Mrs. Gwen L. Salsig, vol I, Oct 1989, p. 37

2.Ibid

3.E-mail message from Sherry Michels on 8 Aug 1998

4. Lawrence County Alabama Early Records (Marriages 1825 – 1854), Odalene Ponder, p. 3

5. Lawrence County Alabama Early Records (Marriages 1825 – 1854), Odalene Ponder, p. 19

6.Ibid

7. Ibid, p. 23

8.Footprints in Time, Abstracts from Lawrence County, Alabama, Newspapers, 1855 – 1890, Myran Thrasher Borden, p. 85

 

Chapter 4 – References and Notes

1. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D.,Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205 (copyright and privately published in 2002), p. 26

2.Genealogical Abstracts from the [Milledgeville] Georgia Journal Newspaper, 1824 – 1828, vol 3, by Fred R. and Emile K. Hartz, p. 515

3. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D.,Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 8, p. 21, p. 25 (copyright and privately published in 2002)

Chapter 5 – References and Notes

1. Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D.,Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 26 (copyright and privately published in 2002)

2. Ibid

3.Historical Notes on Jackson County, Georgia, Frary Elrod, 1967, p. 83

4.History of Gwinnett County, Georgia, James C. Flanagan, 1818 – 1943, vol I, p. 167

5.Gwinnett County, Georgia Inferior Court Minutes for Ordinary Purposes, 1819 – 1861, Alice Smythe McCabe, 1987, p. 5

6.Early Gwinnett County Deeds, Gwinnett Historical Society, Inc., Lawrenceville, Georgia (copied from records of Mildred Carroll Martin on file at Gwinnett Historical Society)

7.Gwinnett County Records as recorded in Athens, Georgia, Newspapers, 1827 – 1849, p. 39

 

Chapter 6 causes a BLOW-UP

Chapter 7 -- References and Notes

1.Gunboats and Cavalry – A History of Eastport, Mississippi, Ben Earl Kitchens, 1985, p. 40

2.Ibid, p.41

3.Ibid, p. 82

4.Ibid, p. 180

 

Chapter 8 – References and Notes

1.Tishomingo County, Mississippi, Deed Book F, 1 November 1840, p.222 (Land description: E1/2 S6 and NE 1/4 S7 all T3 R11E)

2.Tishomingo County, Mississippi, Deed Book O, p. 310 - 311

Chapter 9 - References and Notes

1.Official Bonds of Tishomingo County, Mississippi, 1837 – 1848 (Unpublished Personal Castleberry Genealogy Miscellaneous Research Results and Notes, p. 147.2)

2.Mississippi Confederate Graves, Betty Couch Wiltshire, vol 1, p. 68

3.Ibid, p. 683

4.Castleberry Genealogical (Unpublished material received February 1991), Dr. Henry B. Brackin, Jr., Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205, p. 11

5. Castleberry and Allied Families, Jesse Wendell Castleberry, 12404 Summerport Lane, Windermere, Florida, 34786, 1967, p. 193 - 194

6.E-mail on 16 August 1999 from Edwyna Hale Wackrow of Jacksonville, Florida. Edwyna Hale Wackrow is a descendant of Agnes Mae Castleberry and James Newton Alexander

7.Ibid

8.Valley of Spring – The Story of Iuka, William L. Coker, 1975, p. 72

9.Eastport – Echoes of the Past, Mrs. Irene Barnes, Iuka, Mississippi,1983, p. 91

10.Confederate Magazine, vol XVII, p. 609

11. Ibid

 

 

Chapter 10 – References and Notes

1.Gunboats and Cavalry – A History of Eastport, Mississippi, Ben Earl Kitchens, 1985

2.Hard Times, The Civil War in Huntsville and North Alabama (1861 – 1865), Charles Rice, 1994, p. 129

3.First Baptist Church Minute Book (1846 – 1902), Pontotoc, Mississippi, p. 88, transcribed in 2001 by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet (professional genealogy researcher in Pontotoc, Mississippi)

4. Ibid

5. Ibid, p. 45

6. Ibid, p. 91

7. Pontotoc County, Mississippi, Probate Record, 15 July 1882, v. 20, p. 567 – 569 (LDS Church Microfilm No. 089397)

8. First Baptist Church Minute Book (1846 – 1902), Pontotoc, Mississippi, p. 95, p. 99, transcribed in 2001 by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet (professional genealogy researcher in Pontotoc, Mississippi) NOTE: According to the church minutes William R. Pegues joined the First Baptist Church by letter on 11 September 1881 (p. 95) and was dropped from the church rolls for un-Christian conduct on 10 November 1883 (p. 99)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 11 – References and Notes

1.The Life and Times of Memory E. Leake, Julius Garnett Berry

2. Ibid, p. 16

3. .First Baptist Church Minute Book (1846 – 1902), Pontotoc, Mississippi, p. 45, transcribed in 2001 by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet (professional genealogy researcher in Pontotoc, Mississippi)

 

Chapter 12 - References and Notes

1.Pontotoc County Mississippi Marriages, p. 22

2.Minutes of the First Baptist Church of Pontotoc, Mississippi (1846 – 1902) p. 118 (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet--professional genealogy researcher in Pontotoc, Mississippi, 2001)

3. Ibid, p. 116

4. Ibid, p. 117

5. Ibid, p. 106

6. Ibid, p. 118

7.Lafayette County, Mississippi, Cemetery Records, vol I, p. 105

8.Soundex to Mississippi Marriages, Huntsville, Alabama, Public Library

 

Chapter 13 – References and Notes

1.Minutes of the First Baptist Church of Pontotoc, Mississippi (1846 – 1902) p. 114 (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet--professional genealogy researcher in Pontotoc, Mississippi, 2001)

2.Fevers, Floods, and Faith, A History of Sunflower County, Mississippi, 1844 – 1976, Marie M. Hemphill, 1980, p. 266

 

Chapter 14 – References and Notes

1. Liza King appears in the June 1900 Federal Census for Tippah County, Mississippi as a 17 year old boarder at Blue Mountain College. Her name is also listed in the Twenty Seventh Annual Catalogue for Blue Mountain Female College by Lowrey and Berry (page 13) for the 1899 – 1900 Session.

 

Chapter 15 – References and Notes

1.Compendium of the Confederate Armies (Alabama), Stewart Sifakis, 1992, p. 39

2.Hard Times, The Civil War in Huntsville and North Alabama (1861 – 1865), Charles Rice, 1994, p. 129

3.Mrs. W. D. Chadick’s Civil War Diary, Huntsville, Alabama, Public Library (Heritage Room)

4.Loyal Mountain Troopers, The Second and Third Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry in the Civil War, Reminiscences of Lieutenant John W. Andes and Major Will A. McTeer by Charles S. McCammon (Huntsville, Alabama, Public Library Heritage Room), p. 179 and p. 191

5.Compendium of the Confederate Armies (Alabama), Stewart Sifakis, 1992, p. 71

6.John H. Buchanan’s Diary (4 July 1861 to 9 July 1862), transcribed by Larry J. Mardis and Jo Anne Ketchum Mardis, downloaded from the internet on 25 August 1999, Tippah County, Mississippi, RootsWeb(http://www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/buchanan.htm), p.4

7.Compendium of the Confederate Armies (Alabama), Stewart Sifakis, 1992, p. 71

8.Ibid, p. 72

9.Ibid

10.John H. Buchanan’s Diary (4 July 1861 to 9 July 1862), transcribed by Larry J. Mardis and Jo Anne Ketchum Mardis, p. 4, Downloaded from the Internet on 25 August 1999, Tippah County, Mississippi, Rootsweb Web Site, (http://www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/buchanan.htm)

11.Ibid, p. 5

12.Compendium of the Confederate Armies (Alabama), Stewart Sifakis, 1992, p.72

13.Military History of Mississippi, p. 43

14.Civil War Confederate Service Records for

Winchester D. Castleberry

15.Confederate Magazine, vol XVII, p. 609

16. Enumeration of Confederate Soldiers and Widows – Tishomingo County, Mississippi, 1908 (Wallace State Community College Pamphlet, Hanceville, Alabama)

17.Valley of Spring – The Story of Iuka [Mississippi], William L. Coker, 1975, p. 68

18.Ibid

Chapter 16 – References and Notes

1. The Fox and Stidham Families by Berdie Steadmon Fox, 1987, p. 104, Publisher: The Gregath Company, P.O. Box 1045, Cullman, AL 35056, Reference found at the Lawrence County, Alabama, Historical Society, Moulton, Alabama

2. Ibid, p.105

3. Ibid, p.104

4. Ibid

5. Ibid, p.104

6. Letter to James K. Harrison from Kate Burns Tyler, 10 August 1996, 2121 Columbia Pike, #408, Arlington, VA 22204

7. The Fox and Stidham Families by Berdie Steadmon Fox, 1987, p. 104, Publisher: The Gregath Company, P.O. Box 1045, Cullman, AL 35056, Reference found at the Lawrence County, Alabama, Historical Society, Moulton, Alabama

8. Yalobusha County, MS, Wills of 2nd District, 1871-1911, page 45 and 46, LDS Microfilm No. 894515

17 (?). Yalobusha Bound in 1850 by Chris Borgan

 

Chapter 17 causes a BLOW-UP

Chapter 18 – References and Notes

1. The Scotch-Irish of Colonial Pennsylvania, Wayland F. Dunnaway, 28 – 29 and 38

2. BRR, 11-12

 

 

Chapter 19 – References and Notes

1. This nomenclature I have adopted from Dr. Brackin for identifying and keeping track of the Carroll family members. Dr. Brackin’s research was copyrighted and privately published in 2002. Title: Castleberry Carroll and Kuykendall Families, Henry B. Brackin, Jr., M. D., Apt 419, 500 Elmington Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37205

2.HBB, p. 24

3.HBB, p. 16-17

4.History of the Upper Country of South Carolina, vol 2, John H. Logan, 1910 and 1956, p. 82 (Copy in Huntsville, Alabama, Public Library – Heritage Room)

5. Apparently not all came off "without a scratch" since, according to Lyman Draper, John (H?) Carroll was killed by a Tory late in the Revolutionary War (see Chapter 20), (Draper Papers, p. 73, 16VV72, Col. Sumter’s Papers)

Chapter 20– References and Notes

Rebellion and the Battle of Huck’s Defeat,

7. HBB, p. 27

8. See this Ancestry.com web site for more John H. Carroll information

http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=32748508

 

Chapter 21– References and Notes

Chapter 22– References and Notes

Mills

 

Chapter 23– References and Notes

C. Flanagan, 1818-1943, vol I, p. 568

Frary Elrod, 1967, p. 847

3. Brunswick County, Virginia Deed Book, Volume 4, 1765 – 1770, p. 24, Abstracted by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.,1998. Date of deed was 27 July 1766, Deed Bk 8, p. 327

10. Brunswick County, Virginia Will Book 5, Volume 3, 1780 – 1795, p. 133. Abstracted

by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.,1998. Date of will for Daniel Coleman, Jr. was 17

April 1781

11.Brunswick County Marriages, 1750 – 1853 by John Vogt and T. William Kethley, Jr.,

p. 173

 

Chapter 26 – References and Notes

1. Internet Information – Ancestry.com. The birth/death dates of Eden Coleman’s parents

are from Ancestry.com on 15 March 2007.

2. Greene County, Georgia Land Records Deeds

1785 – 1810, Abstracted by Freda R.

Turner, 1998, p. 110

3. Ibid, p. 183

4. Ibid, p. 169

5. Greene County, Georgia, Deed EE, p. 361

6. Ibid, p. 597

7. Greene County, Georgia, Deed HH, p. 38

8. Greene County, Georgia Wills (1786 – 1877), Abstracted by Freda Reid Turner, 1998, p.119

9. Ibid, p. 175

10.Greene County, Georgia, Deed HH, p. 103

 

Chapter 27– References and Notes

1.Ancestry.com, Clayton and Allied Families

2.Ancestry.com, Thomas Daniel.

3. I have found no record that confirms that Thomas

Daniel was in the Revolutionary War.

4.Greene County, Georgia, Wills (1786 – 1877),

Abstracted by Freda Reid Turner, 1998, p.183

5. Ibid, p. 110 and p. 241

6. Ibid, p. 343

7. Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book EE, p. 317

8. Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book P, p. 258

9. Greene County, Georgia, Wills (1786 – 1877), Abstracted by Freda Reid Turner, 1998,

p. 68. NOTE: Sally Fitzsimmons’ will is dated 22 November 1804.

10.Ibid, p. 103.

11. Ibid, p. 108

12. Ibid, p. 117

Chapter 28 - References and Notes

1. Ancestry.com Internet Information, see William Randle

2. Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book BB, p. 366

3.Ancestry.com Internet Information, Morgan County, Georgia, Will of William Randle dated 2 October 1830

4. Morgan County, Georgia, Deed Book I, p. 571

5. Morgan County, Georgia, Deed Book I, p. 517

and p. 386

1.Ancestry.com Internet Information, 23 October 2002, see Lina Coleman or Daniel T. Coleman

2. History of Greene County Georgia, (1786 – 1886), Rice and Williams, p. 519. The following additional information I got from the Internet: The Rev. Doctor Adiel Sherwood was born 3 October 1791 in Fort Edward, New York, and he died 18 August 1879 in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1821 he married Anne Adams Smith (widow of Peter Early) probably in Greene County, Georgia. She died two years later. He later married ???. Adiel’s great-grandfather (Dr. Thomas Sherwood) came to America with his brother (Andrew) from Nottinghamshire, England, and settled in Connecticut. Adiel’s father was Major Adiel Sherwood who served in the Revolutionary War under George Washington and was with him at Valley Forge. Adiel’s son (Thomas Adiel Sherwood) lived in Missouri where he practiced law and later in 1876 became the Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court.

3. Internet Information, Greene County, Georgia, churches

4. Ancestry.com Internet Information, 23 October 2002, see Clarinda Ann R. Randle

5.Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book HH, p. 132 and p. 174

6.Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book KK, p. 185

7.Greene County, Georgia, Deed Book KK, p. 187

8. Morgan County, Georgia, Deed Book I, p. 290

9. Ibid, p. 517

10.Coweta County, Georgia, Deed Book DD, p. 126 and p. 226, Deed Book KK, p. 187

11. Coweta County Chronicles for One Hundred Years, Mary G. Jones and Lily Reynolds, 1928, p. 78

12.Ibid, p. 79 – 81

13. Laura E. Coleman (1835 – 1928) was seven years old when she moved to Mississippi. This information from material copied 9 November 1991, p. 216, at Pontotoc Library (same source as Ref 30). If correct, this would mean the family moved to Mississippi in 1842.

14. According to a Chickasaw County, Mississippi, deed the land was located in Section 12, Township14, Range 5E. Also, Daniel Coleman was listed on an 1848 Land Roll for Chickasaw County, Mississippi, The People (Book 1) and Land Owners (Book 2), (1836 – 1852), Imogene Springer, p. 65, LDS Church Microfiche No. 6101315

15. The four-acre lot was located in the northeast ¼ of Section 15, Township 14, Range 6E. Information from: A Brief History of Aberdeen and Monroe County, Mississippi (1821 – 1900), p. 57, LDS Church Microfiche No. 6048070

16. First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi, Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p.14 (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi, 2001)

17. Ibid, p. 19 and p. 93

18.Story of Pontotoc, Part I, The Chickasaws, E. T. Winston, 1931, p. 125

19. First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi, Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p. 117 (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi , 2001)

20.Pontotoc County, Mississippi, Deed Book 10, 1854 - 1856, p. 144 – 145, property location: Southwest 1/4 of Section 33, Township 9S, Range 3E)

21.First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi, Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p. 19 (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi , 2001)

22. Ibid, p. 23

23. Ibid, p. 23 – 24

24. Story of Pontotoc, Part I, The Chickasaws, E. T. Winston, 1931

25. Ibid, p. 113

26. Ibid, p. 128

27. Marriages and Deaths, Mississippi Newspapers, vol 1, 1837 – 1863, p. 71

28. Morgan County, Georgia, Deed Book I, p. 517

29. Pontotoc County, Mississippi, Probate Record 19, p. 77 – 80

30. The Pontotoc City Cemetery was given to the City of Pontotoc by the Chickasaws and the U.S. Government on June 22, 1852, because "many Chickasaws and their white friends were buried there." Maj. Gen William Colbert (son of James Logan1 Colbert) was buried there in 1835. The Rev. Thomas C. Sturart, missionary to the Chickasaws, is also buried in the City Cemetery. Taken from: http://www.pontotoc.net/tour.htm on 10 May 2007

 

 

Chapter 30 – References and Notes

1. E-mail (cole-dean@softcom.net) from Dean Coleman of Stockton, California on 25 January 2006. Dean Coleman is a grandson of Walter Samuel Coleman.

2. Material copied at Pontotoc, Mississippi, Library on 9 Nov 1991 p. 164 (this material may be from the Pontotoc County Pioneers Quarterly)

3. Ibid

4. Pontotoc County Mississippi Computer Indexed Marriage Records, Hunting for Bears, Inc, Nicholas Russell Murray NOTE: Some sources give Laura Coleman’s wedding date as December 31, 1858. I believe it was December 31, 1857. In the Pontotoc Baptist Church Minutes (Ref 6 above) on page 30 it says: "A letter of dismision was granted to Mrs. Laura Scott formally Laura Coleman." The date for this entry by the church clerk (Daniel T. Coleman) was 6 March 1858. Furthermore, she was supposedly married on a Thursday and 31 December 1858 was on Friday. So, I think her wedding date was 31 December 1857, which was on a Thursday.

5. First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p. 16 and p. 41, (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi , 2001)

6. The Life and Times of Memory E. Leake, Julius Garnett Berry, (privately published ca 1960), p. 77 NOTE: A copy of this book is in the Tupelo, Mississippi Public Library.

7. From material copied at Pontotoc, Mississippi, Library on 9 Nov 1991, p. 216 (this material may be from the Pontotoc County Pioneers Quarterly)

8. First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p. 45, (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi , 2001)

9. Vaughn’s book about Tupelo history

10.The Life and Times of Memory E. Leake, Julius Garnett Berry (privately published ca 1960)

11. Ibid, p. 44

12. Ibid, p. 82

13. First Baptist Church Pontotoc, Mississippi Minute Book (1846 – 1902), p. 45, (transcribed by Mrs. Hazel Boss Neet of Pontotoc, Mississippi , 2001)

14. Ibid, p. 44

15. Ancestry.com Internet Information, 15 March 2003, see Lina Coleman

16. Ibid

17. The Life and Times of Memory E. Leake, Julius Garnett Berry (privately published

ca 1960), p. 4 – 8

 

Chapter 31 - References and Notes

1. From Augustus Coleman’s tombstone in city cemetery of Pontotoc, Mississippi. Also,

from material copied at Pontotoc, Mississippi, Library on 9 Nov 1991, p. 216 (this

material may be from the Pontotoc County Pioneers Quarterly)

2. Taken from: http://www.pontotoc.net/tour.htm on 10 May 2007

 

 

 

Chapter 33 - References and Notes

1.Spotsylvania County VA Deed Book Q, p. 402 , p. 404, also Spotsylvania County VA

Deed Book R, p. 504-505

2.Personal Property Tax Records for Spotsylvania County, VA (1782-1822)

3.Marriages of Orange County, Virginia (1747 - 1810) by Catherine L. Knorr

Spotsylvania County (1721-1800) at

Ancestry.com

9. Spotsylvania County VA Deed Book P, p.158

Chapter 34 – Reference and Notes

1.Marriages of Orange County, Virginia (1747 -

1810) by Catherine L. Knorr

2. Orange County, VA Deed Book 19, p. 84

3. Marriages of Orange County, Virginia (1747 -

1810) by Catherine L. Knorr

4. Orange County, VA, Deed Book 20, p. 204

5. Orange County, VA, Deed Book 20, p. 205

6. Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book P, p. 299 –

300

7. Personal Property Tax Records for Spotsylvania

County, VA (1782-1822)

8. Spotsylvania County, VA, Deed Book O, p. 487

9. Wilkes County, GA, Deed Book SS, p. 226

10. Wilkes County, GA, Deed Book VV, p. 175

11. Early Records of Georgia, Volume One, Wilkes County, Grace Gilliam Davidson, p.

304

12. Wilkes County, Georgia, Tax Records, 1785 - 1805, Volume Two, Compiled by

Frank Parker Hudson

13. The Wilkes County Papers 1773 - 1833, Compiled by Robert Scott Davis, Jr., p. 181

14. The Wilkes County Papers 1773 - 1833, Compiled by Robert Scott Davis, Jr., p. 203;

also recorded in Wilkes County GA Book L, fo. 303

15. Wilkes County, GA, Deed Book YY, p. 481

16. The Territorial Papers of the United States, Compiled and edited by Clarence Edwin

Carter, Volume VI, The Territory of Mississippi (1809 - 1817), p. 470

17. Residents of the Southeastern Mississippi Territory, Book One, Jean Strickland & Patricia N.

Edwards, P.O. Box 5147, Moss Point, MS, 39563, 1995, p.109

18. Wilkes County, GA, Deed Book BBB, p. 168

19. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, Vol I, Compiled by John Paul Smith,

1984, p. 134

 

Chapter 35 - References and Notes

1. Spotsylvania County VA Deed Book Q, p. 402

and p. 404

3. Spotsylvania County Patriots (1774-1782)

4. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book O, p.

490

5. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book P, p. 252

6. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book T, p. 175

7. U. S. GenWeb Site for Spotsylvania County,

VA. See 1798 Direct Tax List for Berkeley

Parish, Spotsylvania County, VA

8.Personal Property Tax Records for

Spotsylvania County, VA (1782-1822)

12. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book Q, p.

402-404

 

 

13. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book R,

14. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book Q,

p. 449

15. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book Q,

p. 483-484

16. Spotsylvania County, VA Deed Book S,

p. 432 and 484

17. Adair County, KY Deed Book D, p. 118

18. Adair County, KY Deed Book D, p. 128

p. 449

21. Adair County, KY Deed Book C, p. 315

22. Adair County, KY Deed Book C, p. 433

p. 161-164

25. Orange County, VA Deed Book 19, p. 84

p. 305

p. 357

28. A History of Early Spotsylvania by

James Roger Mansfield (1977), p. 133

 

Chapter 36 – Reference and Notes

3. Lawrence County, MS, deed written on

5 February 1818

Chapter 37 – References and Notes

1. Early Records of Georgia, Vol I, Wilkes County

by Grace Gilliam Davidson, 1932, p. 304

2. Minutes of the Wilkes County Inferior Court (1811 - 1817), p. 153

Chapter 38 – References and Notes

 

1. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, Vol I,

Compiled by John Paul Smith, 1984, p. 137

2. Lawrence County Deed Bk. A, 1818 and 1819

3. Bethany Baptist Church, Organized by William E. Stamps on

3 June 1819 at White Sandy Creek, Lawrence County, MS,

(LDS Microfilm No. 1036220)

4. Lawrence County, MS, Marriages, 1818 - 1879, p. 39

5. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, Vol III, Deed

Books B (1826 - 1835) and C (1835 - 1840), Compiled by

John Paul Smith, 1989, p. 20 (original record in Deed Book B

(20 Dec 1828), p. 125- 127

 

 

Chapter 39 – References and Notes

1. Residents of the Mississippi Territory, Book 2A,

Jean Strickland and Patricia N. Edwards, 1996,

p. 17

2. Carroll County, Mississippi Pioneers by Betty C. Wiltshire, p. 10

3. Records of Lawrence County, Miss, vol II, by J. P. Smith, p. 44

4.Records of Lawrence County, Miss, vol I, by John Paul Smith,

5.Lawrence County Mississippi Marriages (1818 – 1879) by Maxie

Ruth Hedgepeth Brake, p. 42

6.Carroll County, Mississippi Estate Records (1840 – 1869) by Betty C. Wilshire, p. 12

Ref Book, Hanceville, AL

Ref Book, Hanceville, AL

Chapter 40 – References and Notes

 

1. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, Vol III, Deed Book B (1826 – 1835) and Deed Book C (1835 – 1840), compiled by John Paul Smith, 1989, p. 53 (original record in Lawrence County, MS, Deed Book B, 27 Feb 1834, p. 391)

2. The Reverend William W. Whitehead, Mississippi Pioneer: his antecedents and descendants, E. Grey Dimond, M. D., Diastole-Hospital Hill, Inc, Kansas City, MO 64108, 1985, p. 318

3. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, vol III, Deed Book B (1826 – 1835) and Deed Book C (1835 – 1840), compiled by John Paul Smith, 1989, p. 64 (original record in Lawrence County, Mississippi, Deed Book B, 27 Feb 1834, p. 391)

4. Carroll County [Mississippi] Pioneers by Betty C. Wiltshire, p. 24

5 .Holmes County [MS] Deed Book A, (June 1834), p. 175

6. Holmes County [MS] Deed Book A, (August 1834), p. 71

8. Carroll County [MS] Pioneers by Betty C. Wiltshire, p. 83

9. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book N, p. 331

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chapter 41 - References and Notes

 

1. The Reverend William W. Whitehead, Mississippi Pioneer: his antecedents and descendants, by E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Diastole-Hospital Hill, Inc., Kansas City, MO 64108, 1985, p. 4

2. Ibid

3. Records of Lawrence County, Mississippi, Vol I, Compiled by John Paul Smith, 1984, p. 295

4. The Reverend William W. Whitehead, Mississippi Pioneer: his antecedents and descendants, by E. Grey Dimond, M.D., Diastole-Hospital Hill, Inc., Kansas City, MO 64108, 1985, p. 3

5. Ibid

6. Holmes County, MS, RootsWeb Internet Information, p. 121

7. Carroll County, Mississippi, Cemetery Records, Ethel Bibus & Louise Marshall, p. 152

8. Ibid, p. 151

9. Material from Yvonne Olliphant Traylor, Winter Park, FL, 22 Sept 1999, also e-mail message on 25 Apr 2000 (Laura Lovisa King Olliphant is an ancestor)

10. Ancestry.com Internet Site, MS Marriage Index, 1826–50

11. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book M, p. 451

12. Marriage Records in Carroll County Courthouse, Carrollton, Mississippi, Mrs. O. K. Gee, Sr., p.73

13. History of Carroll County, Mississippi, by William Franklin Hamilton, p. 15 and p. 49

14. Holmes County Mississippi Pioneers by Betty C. Wiltshire, 1993, p.31

15.Clarke County, MS, Deed Book F, p. 582

16.Clarke County, MS, Deed Book F, p. 491

17. Clarke County, MS, Deed Book F, p. 584

21. Clarke County, MS, Deed Book H, p. 338

23. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book N, p. 487

24. 1866 Clarke County, MS, Census (Wallace

State Community College Library, Hanceville,

AL)

25. The Reverend William W. Whitehead,

Mississippi Pioneer: his antecedents and

descendants, by E. Grey Dimond, M.D.,

Diastole-Hospital Hill, Inc., Kansas City, MO

64108, 1985, p. 53

 

Chapter 42 – References and Notes

 

3. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book M, p. 450

4. Yvonee Olliphant Traylor, Winter Park, FL, (Laura Lovisa King Olliphant descendant), e-mail communications on 22 Sept 1999 and 25 Apr 2000

5. 1866 Clarke County, Mississippi, Census (Wallace State Community College Library, Hanceville, Alabama)

6.Yvonee Olliphant Traylor, Winter Park, FL, (Laura Lovisa King Olliphant descendant), e-mail communications on 22 Sept 1999 and 25 Apr 2000

 

 

 

Chapter 43 – References and Notes

1. Holmes County Mississippi Pioneers by Betty C.

Wiltshire, 1993, p. 138

2. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book N, p. 331

This 480 acres described as S1/2 of

S25,T15,R4E

6. Holmes County Mississippi Pioneers by Betty C. Wiltshire, 1993, p. 40

7. Holmes County, MS, Deed Book M, p. 522

8. Holmes County, MS, Will Book 1, p. 210

C. Wiltshire, 1993, p. 139

 

 

Chapter 46 – References and Notes

1.Ancestry.com information on 24 Oct 2004. See this URL: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pabst2&id=I08558

Ancestry.com cites the following: Revolutionary War information from Dorothy Hurter on August 23, 2003. Her email address is: CarlHurter@aol.com


Chapter 47 – References and Notes


1.Ancestry.com information on 24 Oct 2004. See this URL: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pabst2&id=I08558

2.Ancestry.com information on 24 Oct 2004. See this URL: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pabst2&id=I08558

Ancestry.com cites the following: Revolutionary War information from Dorothy Hurter on August 23, 2003. Her email address is:
CarlHurter@aol.com


3. Ancestry.com information on 24 Oct 2004. See this URL: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pabst2&id=I08558

Ancestry.com cites the following source: E-Mail from Dero Ramsey, 7 September 2003, at deroram@ebicom.net
Charles Montgomery, b 1748, date taken from tombstone at Old Brick Church by Mrs. Meta Hightower, d 27 Sep 1820
m. Margaret Reynolds, 1774. She was b 1752 in Ireland; d 16 Aug 1818.
Charles P. Montgomery, Sr. middle initial came from the Clan Montgomery website and from information sent via gedcom from Mel Stephens January 13, 2000.

 

Chapter 48 – References and Notes

1. Internet information from Ancestry. com on 24 Oct 2004. See Montgomery/Trinkle-Shuck/Stickley Family Trees at the following URL:

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pabst2&id=I08558

Ancestry.com contacts given are Jim and Judy Montgomery at email pabst04@comcast.net

Chapter 51 – References and Notes

1. Sonny Montgomery, The Veteran’s Champion; G. V. "Sonny" Montgomery with Michael B. Ballard, Craig S. Piper; University Press of Mississippi, 2003, p. 7

 

 

 

 

INDEX